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Report: Page 4 
Leading article 
Page 19 




speedy inquest on Princess ‘for sake of the boys’ 



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Bv Andrew PiEHCfi • - • 

' POLITICAL CORKBSPONDENT - 

MEMBEJ&of.the. Rqy aL ,.Family? 
are pressing.'for a swift inquest into' 
the-death erf Diana, Princess, of. 
Wates,to try- to end the speculation. 
and conspiracy iheDries'suifound- 
mg her last hours. ' . 

Buckingham Palace is increase 
ingly anxious- tor the French au¬ 
thorities tocompletetheir criminal 
investigation quickly, to 1 enable the 
British inquest to go ahead;' ; • • 
■:The Royal Pampas coraaem has. 
beerehei^itersed the suggestion 


that ; the Princess might, have sur¬ 
vived had she-been .taken rtraight 
tO : hospital rather than treated at 
the scene after hw.car crashed in a 
Parisian undarpass last August ^ 
The dann was .made inthe book. 
Death of a Princessz'An investiga- 
' bon, which is being serialised in 
The Tithes ,'and the surgeon.. 

Whp treated thePrinccsshasinsist- 
ed that nothing could have saved: 
her, the French practice of exten¬ 
sive on-site emergency treatment is 
comnuf under dose scrutiny. . 

. - With more books and films in the 
pipeline, the Itoyal. Household is 


anxious for facts to emerge from 
Paris to try to end the speculation 
and resolve the growing number of 
conflicting accounts. Only yester¬ 
day a young Parisian chef claimed 
that, emergency services ignored 
him when he tried to summon help 
for the Princess. 

JEric Pfctd told the magazine 
Vb/ti that he was the first on the 
scene of the accident; that he was 
fold ."this is rubbish” when he 
telephoned for an ambulance, and 
that he was handcuffed when he 
ran to a police station to report the 
aash: His account is now being 


considered by the magistrate in 
charge of the investigation. 

While the Royal Family will not 
publidy complain about the time 
that investigation is taking, the 
Palace is dearly deeply concerned 
about the delay. The Prince of 
Wales is particularly anxious for 
the publication of an official report 
in Britain because of the effect the 
uncertainly has had on his sons. 

An official said: “We are pressing 
for a speedy resolution to this. It is 
not helpful if this is dragged out 
We want the uncertainty taken out 
of the equation. People forget how 


hurtful the speculation :s. With ihe 
boys’ inrerests in mind, we have 
made dear v\e warn nu delays in 
hringing this to a conclusion sinn¬ 
er rather than later. Everyone 
associated with the boys takes the 
same view.” 

Frances Shand Kydd. the 
Princess's mother, said: “The spec¬ 
ulation is so upsetting. Imagine 
what effect it has on the boys.” But 
she declined to comment on the 
delay in holding an inquest, saying: 
“It is a long process, but it is die law 
of that land 

The views of the Royal Family 


have been coveyed to the British 
embassy in Paris and to the 
Foreign Office. “They know wc 
want this cleared up as quickly as 
possible.” the Palace official added. 

But Michael Burgess, the deputy 
coroner to the Royal Household, 
conceded yesterday that the inquest 
might still not have been held by 
the anniversary of the crash. 

An inquest has to be held 
because the bodies of the Princess 
and her companion Dodi Fayed 
were flown back to this country - for 
burial. 

Mr Burgess, who will conduct 


•Jie inquesr with Dr John Burion. 
coroner to the Royal Household, 
said: “This is a high-profile case 
and everything has to he weighed 
up very carefully. The questions eo 
beyond the survivability’ argu¬ 
ment over whether she should have 
gone to hospital sooner the speed 
of the car: searhelLv where people 
were sitting. These are all relevant 
questions which an inquest cannot 
address until the police inquiry is 
completed.” 

Chefs evidence, page 3 
Death of a Princess, pages 15-17 




By Phiup Webster, - James Landaleand Pollst Newton 


THE Government was defeat¬ 
ed in the Lords, last night as 
peers voted to restrict price 1 ' 
cutting campaigns by national 
newspapers... *; -. ; V : 

The Lacds sqfedby 121Vares 
to 93, a majority of, 28, -for an 
amendment- fa-the Camped-, 
non Bill -which mated a pre¬ 
venting any: ;> newspaper: 
abusing a . "dtapihanr pos¬ 
ition" in.the market to “eumi- - 
nale” any rival publications. 

The amendment demanded- 
that “any conduct on the part 
of tme arpmcmbsmal rtexv^ 
papers whkh- amounts to an 
abuse of a - dominant position 
is prohibited if. it- may reduce 
the diverinty arf the national 
newspaper press in the UK by 
reducing, retarding, injuring 
or'btimimaling competition". 

The derision was deeply 
embarrassingfbr the Govern- 
rpentwhich had strongly op¬ 
posed the amendment: 
Downing Street said it was 
"riot sensible” Officials said it 
would lead to-increased regi* . 
far ary burdens and and be out 
af line witb European Union 
law; 

Ministers - will attempt to. 
overturn it when it reaches the 
Commons but are certain to 
face troublefrom the Left, 
which will oppose a move 
which it will claim is designed 
tohelp Rupert Murdoch.. 

The move was backed hy.the' 
Liberal Democrats, headed try 
Lord ' McNally, the former 
political adviser to James (now 
Lord) Callaghan, the Labour 
Prime Minister in : the late 
1970s. 

He was supported by Lord 
-Borne, the Labour pea- who 
was director-general of Fair 
Trading between 1979 and . 
1992: Lord Borne is alsp a 


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grosswqrps- 
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OKTUARiS.;..-. issiiM Y 
UBBY JpURVESj-J8; : 

AkA 

'CHESS& 

cdinb* & social:.- 20. 

SPORT_:.JL..46 &5t 

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- director, of Mirror Group 
Newspapers, which is a sub¬ 
stantial shareholder- in The 
Independent. TTte move was 

■ also backed by a senior Tory 
.peet*, Atisoounl Astor. af former 
Tqty.yvhip,vid- Lord-Adcner,- 
a proartinenr Law Lord. :• 

■ Lord McNally said;: “The 
:i«esioit pdky of 77te -Times 
xftjes not make sense unless it 

* .is to dear the field, of two 1 
major competitors'-- The Dai¬ 
ly-. telegraph and The 
independent”. 

- '-The amendment was fierce^ 
ly apposed by the Government 
which was keen ■ to avoid 
having to.use its Commons 
majority to overturn the move 
when the Bill leaves the Lords. 

The Competition Bill is de¬ 
signed to bring British - compe¬ 
tition law up-to-date and -in: 
tine with European legisla-. 
tioru Under, its provisions, the • 
Director Gen eral of Fair Trad- 
' mg would hiave new powers to 
damp down on anti-competi¬ 
tive action and abuses of 
dominant market positions. 

After the vote Lord McNally 
said: "I think it is . raw: a 
stronger bill and I sincerely 
hope that the Government will' 
listen to the House of Lords." 

ft>r tiie Government, Lord 
Simon of Highbuiy, the Min- 
ister fw Competitiveness,, said 
the Government believed that 
it was wrong in prira^pfe to 
.have different "prctiiibnions" 

- for different sectors. ’ ■ 

“Prohibition is a very seri¬ 
ous matter. The question of 
whether a specific practice is 
or is not anti-competitive is not 
a matter about which I can 
properly express an opinion.” 

Lord Simon insisted that the 
Competition BilJ would en- 

- hance competition and en¬ 
hance consumer choice by 
lowering prices. And he 
admitted that predatory pric¬ 
ing was bad for competition 
ana the consumer. But he 
insisted: “This Bill meets the 

: Government's commitment to 

introduce legislation against 
an abuse of dominance to the . 
market including - predatory 

• pricing: There is no case for 
using this Bill for: targeting 
one sector of the market or one 
company." 

Debate; page 9 



Rivals to tihe Spice Girts: the All Saints — Shaznay, left, Natalie, Nicola and Melanie — are thought by some to be the new top all-girl band 


Anger at 
absent 
Brit pop 
bands 

By Cakol M iixj ley 


THE organisers of The Brit 
Awards last night attacked the 
sneering “hypocrisy" of bands 
who refused to perform at the 
ceremony to maintain street 
credibility. 

Four out of five best group 
nominees — The Verve. Oasis. 
Radiohead and Prodigy — 
declined to appear at lasT 
nighfs Docklands ceremony 
in London. Most ple-aded prior 
engagements. 

Arriving at the awards cere¬ 
mony last night. Cherie Blair, 
rhe Prime Minister's wife, was 
confronted by protests about 
the sacking of a worker by a 
Polygram subsidiaty. One 
demonstrator vaulted a barri¬ 
er to Talk to Mrs Blair. The 
man was detained by police. 
Other protesters were hefd at 
bay. 

It was also an unhappy 
occasion for the Spice Girls, 
taunted this week by claims, 
that they have been usurped 
by the new all-girl band All 
Saints. 

Criticising rhe bands who 
snubbed last night’s event 
Malcolm Genie, Brits' tele¬ 
vision show executive produc¬ 
er. said: “Why do concerts? 
Why do interviews for NME? 
Why do promotion at ail? I do 
think there is an underlying 
element of hypocrisy." 


Railtrack offers 
cheaper link 

Railtrack has put forward 
plans for a cut-price Channel 
Tunnel rail link as its price for 
rescuing the project 
It would save £2-7 billion by 
ending the high-speed section 
short of London, avoiding 
more than 12 miles of 
tunnelling...-- Page 27 

West Indies 
go one up 

Carl Hooper guided West 
Indies to a three-wicket vic¬ 
tory over England in the 
second Test in Trinidad. 

His captain. Brian Lara, 
described his unbeaten 94 as 
“the best timings he has ever 
played”. West Indies lead 1-0 
in me series-.—.-Page 52 

Child support to 
be simplified 

A simple tax rate for difid 
maintenance payments is 
being considered as part of a 
reform of the Child Support 
Agency to be announced in 
the summer, Frank Field, 
Welfare Reform Minister, 
told'MPs-- Page 2 


Saddam ‘has big stocks 
of Agent 15 nerve gas’ 

By Philip Webster, political editor 


PRESIDENT Saddam Hus¬ 
sein has built up big stocks erf 
the nerve gas Agent 15, which 
is designed to stupefy enemy 
forces, the Defence Secretary 
told MPs last night. 

The gas — which can be 
fired from missiles or put in 
water supplies — causes weak¬ 
ness, dizziness, disorientation, 
hallucinations and loss of co¬ 
ordination. 

Iraq's stockpile came to light 
through intelligence reports at 
the end of last year. The 
Ministry of Defence was alert¬ 
ed by a reference in an Iraqi 
document which said that Iraq 
was carrying out laboratory 
research on the agent. 

George Robertson, the De¬ 
fence Secretary, said that that 
Iraq had had Agent 15 during 
the Gulf War in 1991, although 
there was no confirmed evi¬ 
dence that it had used it. But 
he believed that the fact that 
Saddam had yet another ele¬ 
ment in his chemical and 
biological armoury should re- 


BfWflD 

TiMETflSlE 

CntMlM 
inerK vY 
cwruitiry 

<HCno<W 

tHtrwtf 







move all doubts about the 
need to force him to allow UN 
weapons inspectors to resume 
their work, 

“Among all the other horri¬ 
fying weapons that Saddam 
has used in the past, there is 
now another agent — Agent 15 
— the like of which should 
make most of us wonder why 
on earth there is any equivoca¬ 


tion in forcing him fo comply 
with his obligations," he said. 

The disclosure is lifcefy lo be 
followed by other revelations 
about Iraqis chemical weap¬ 
ons as Britain and America 
seek to build support for 
military action. But the diffi¬ 
culty of that task was demon¬ 
strated yesterday when King 
Hussein or Jordan said that he 
would not support military 
action that harmed the people 
of Iraq. “The people have 
suffered enough. " he said 
after meeting the Prime Min¬ 
ister in Downing Street. 

Left-wing Labour MPS also 
voiced opposition to military 
action. Tony Benn presented a 
letter saying.-The Govern¬ 
ment's role as The only cheer¬ 
leader for US sabre-rattling 
within the international com¬ 
munity is the opposite of what 
an ethical approach ra foreign 
policy would require.” 

Border sealed, page 13 
Leading article, page 19 


, Sstrii Fra 100; 

Finland f mk JOJft Fran* Ft 
Germany DM 4.5ft Gibffiliaf VOtt 
: Greece Dr 650: Netherlands Ft 5.50; 

Morocco Dir 3000: Norway KrZMJft 
raitugai con Esc 3 SQ; Spain Ws 925; 
, Sweden:skr z5.oo: Switzerland S Rs 
1 500: Tunisia Oln WOO; USA 


N 





The secret of Enoch Powell’s early love poetry 


By DwwiaN Whitworth 

A BATCH of Enoch Powell's early tove 
poems was at the centre of a literary 
mystery last night after 3 senior 
Church of England dergyman claimed 
they were addressed ,to a man. 

The politician, who died on Sunday, 
had suffered anguish over his close 
friendship with an unidentified man 
while he was an undergraduate at 
Cambridge, according to Canon Eric 
James, a presenter of Radio 4$ 
Thought for the Dtiy. who is Extra 

preacher to the Queen. . 

Mr James, who was chaplain or 
Trinity College. Cambridge some 


years after Mr Pdwdl was a student 
there, said that Mr Powell had 
confided in him about the relationship 
a decade ago, but he had sworn to keep 
it secret until after his death. 

In a letter to.The Times today Mr 
James recalls a meeting with Mr 
Pbwel] in IQ8S: “The conversation 
turned, not surprisingly, to 
A.E. Housman^s influence on Powell at 
Trinity College, which, he made clear, 
was related not only to HGusman's 
poetry and classical scholarship but to 
ws~/'understanding of Housman'S 
homosexual condition.” 

“Pbwdl gave me that day a signed 
copy of First Poems , drawing my 


attention ro certain of those “fifty short 
lyrics” in which he tried to put into 
words what a homosexual friendship 
had meant to him." 

Mr James adds: “I promised Enoch 1 
would not disclose what he had said to 
me about the homosexual basis of 
certain of his poems until after his 
death. Then it would be a matter of 
literary history." 

Mr James told The Times lasT night 
that he believed Mr Powell might have 
opened up to him because he was 
familiar with the Cambridge scene at 
the time. “He said: The most painful 
thing at my early life was that 
relationship'." Mr James said he did 


not reveal the man's identity nor even 
whether he was at Cambridge. 

The poem reads: 

Us true I loved you from the first: 

Yet had 1 turned away. 

I should haw soon forgot my thirst 
And happier been to-day. 

Far now your face is graven deep 
Upon my inward sight. 

And when I wake and when l sleep. 

I see you day and night; 

And since our parting is decreed 
By laws tw cannot break. 

The severed tissues long wilt bleed 
And long the wound tall ache. 

Letters, page 19 




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Large, f 105. Medium. 1611 Small. £-10. 

Also jvjil.iHc in IS cant gold. 

Tiffany & Co. 


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2HQME NEWS 


TUB TIMES TUESDAY FEBRU ARY 10 


alarm 





W ar must be immi¬ 
nent: Martin Bell’s 
suit is getting whit¬ 
er. At this rate, reporters will 
have to bring sunglasses into 
the Press Gallery. 

Once, the attire of the Inde¬ 
pendent victor at Tatum could 
have been called cream. But at 
Defence Questions yesterday, 
the former BBC war corre¬ 
spondent's suit was positively 
i i, line Hard In look 3t 


of 


white-. A narrow, pale 
Breen tie lent the ensemble the 
took of a small caterpillar on 

an anguished lily. 

And what a difference a 
weekend makes! last week 
MPs could hardly wait ro 
storm Baghdad. But the week- 


Drfence Secreuuy 
(“This is not worth the life of a 
single British soldier!") was 
only a more confident version 
of his usual line. 

No. what was new was a 

lowering of ,.•“*•"5! 
among hawkish MPS. The 



mavhe an attempt is being 

lowering « “dTto bring bUencho* ““‘SSdPSbS 

end press seems K> ha« 

'^hSniSwn^c^ ssssS5JS3«“ 

t££s53s. ssisigg* 32 &?ssb3£ 

iLl ” in 3 ta 0 ^ on "'^ ——- K, the a&ed threat 

stead)! whose defiant cay to the 


Walsall Kf- Answering dw 
liberal Democrat spokesman, 
* romnhfJL who liiter- 


^ ^ tli^ flU 

he-credible-became-a pm- 

dple is at stake", Mr Robot- iw ^ v «- MrWinnidt insisted. jfo ^ the (doubtless 

«Sagreed,butadj^^d^ f^f^nportant in speU out ^^S^thaiwekwmai- 
was “an opnon of tost resort,? Actives are" “!?°!S* oH wnte ; 

to-be dear w^we^dOTig 

has become for sameMp. a 

feassw S^s&sse 

^>jaJ5JSSS££ unleash 


diplomacy fails"- 
emphasised; too,: to Crispin 
Blunt (G Reigate): “//it comes 
to..." and “if this diplomacy 

fails ..." , 

Speaking as one who was 
“cat me front line last tune . 
Mr Bell told ministers that 
there should be “no achoa 
without some sort of coalman 
of opinion, at home, among 
the Allies,. and among the 
Arab states”. Mr Blunt was 


shrewuj w —r: 

ists will aH wnle 

“wenwtow-terev^. 


Hnmo It m UK UWI -— - 

aJLMr. RobertsOTrk^tm^- 

ihn he hoped wewould not 

^^doMirfiaWverT*^ 



Unua»u k “ — ~ ■ 

bade benches, ror 
wctell? 


would' 


steady, whose defiant cry to me - 

CSA rethink will 


scrap complex 


4 

i 


A SIMPLE tax rate for child 
maintenance payments is 
being considered by ministers 
as part of a radical reform 1 of 
the Child Support Agency to 
be announced in the summer. 

Frank Field, the Welfare 
Reform Minister, said yester¬ 
day that a flat-rate levy linked 
to "the earnings of the absent 
parent could replace the 
present complicated formula 
of assessing maintenance. 
Sneaking during a Commons 
debate on the Child Support 

Agency, Mr Held pledged that 

the Government would come 
forward with proposals be¬ 
fore June to ensure a fair ana 
efficient” child support system. 

He told MPs there was a 
“crunch question” to be faced 
in the coming months, we 
will have to choose at some 
stage whether we are going to 
have a complicated formula or 
move to something mum sim¬ 
pler — a possible single tax 

Officials said later that raw 
option is to.link rates with 
income bands. A father eanv 
ine E2Q0 a week for example 
might pay £50 a week m 
maintenance paymmis.wWe 
one on E250 a week might pay 
£70. Under the present scheme 
a variety of factors are taken 
into account including income 


of both parents, housing costs. «*«*" whe " di!pU “ 

StfSST-JS Ssmm 

Sfsws? stSSsSS 

.« __• - .-^4 rvi if m 


LlDcTal — 

single mothers turned out m 
force in Westminster to sup¬ 
port the call for change. 

Opening the debate. David 
Rendel, the liberal Democrat 
spokesman argued that me 
Child Support Agency should 
be abolished. “The CSA has 
failed in its objectives and 
must go," he said. Mr Rendel 
called for a system of media¬ 
tion to arrive at voluntary 

agreements backed by a fam- 
_l _taWs.nol to pnfnrce 


as iuuuaiufc*> --- 

ffies had to be sorted out A 
government amendment ta¬ 
bled by the Prime Minister 
and five senior Cabinet col¬ 
leagues was highly critical ot 
the agency but did not comntit 
Labour to abolishing the CSA. 
It said the body was intro¬ 
duced in a "hasty and ill- 
thought-out manner” by tne 
previous Government. 

Outside die Commons, 
mothers from the Campaign 
. •__ .1 _Cur*nnrt Ad 



news in brief 


i¥ ; 


on jobs 
is ruled 
Unfair 




An age limit barrrogtfae orar- 
6Ss from 

missal has bem rejectedby ^ 

industrial wfo* 

ruled that Bnte& 

of Rome. The . tribunal at 

Croydon ruled unaimna^ 

jjhat James Nash, M, formeriy 

a wartffiouse managwcOTdd 


sch 

istmeni 




' ft',' 


s' me : 


Camocn inw "- 1 —«nz 

Unit, argited thatn^ roen , 

than women continited work¬ 
ing pasttheagerfteso^ 
SB amounted to mefirect 

6 -T JicrrtmmatkHi acainst -. 


l-..i 

r, - 




j y 


■i*efT 


men. 




agreemeno backed by a fam- 

ily court or tribunal to enforce ^°^ anked ^ placards and 

,__iKnn fm- the CSA to 




ett 
am 
en 
seb 
she 
tkn 
cor. 
styi 
ma 
Cm 
1 
up 
pro 
Tht 
Go- 
sds 
a c 
wai 
diff 
whi 
ahe 
to 
whi 
tice 
are 
Y 
bus 
ask 
• lea\ 
whi 
If t 
thlr 
moi 
thoi 
und 
fine 
can 
tun 
T 
ed 
stre 
the 
bea 
you 
whe 
con’ 
niai 
that 
und 
druj 
fon 
cal 
tion 
W 
nou 

sian 

tog. 

ansi 

able 

now 

U 

prio 

then 

The 

up 

belie 
pria 
then 
prov 
rice 
seen 
wou 
rice. 



were flanked Oy piararu^^- 
ban ners calling for the CSA to 
be scrapped. . 

Kim Sparrow. 35, a single 
mother of one from northwest 
London, said: "Eversmce the 
CSA was introduced it has 
been about cutting the single 
mothers* benefit" 


Harman softens 

Reductions in disability allowance 
will he checked by an independent 
assessor, reports Nicholas Watt 

. »_i'k « t r M .Miate Ms Ham 


Middlesbrou^ yesterday 


Hot drink daims 






Field:- 

fairness and' 


HARRIET HARMAN re¬ 
sponded last night to growing 
anger within Labour ranks at 
the p a<y of welfare reform by 
announcing a safeguard to 

prevent disability benefits _ 

■en about cutting the single that the " nmole to be ri^iL" However, Ms Harman 

«S!S£d.- s3 grrss’ra: 

them or don’t want them m before anybody known as the Bei^tlntegnty .^ ^^ heauae they have a. 

»3r^i SSS.:i saass ■***«* 

~KSS“" I SWSBSSKrai ■ 3- 


“For those disabled people 
who are unable to ^warklwant 
to reinforce the dear assur¬ 
ances given byTony Blair that 
Ste tlris Labour Gov^ 
ment no (me in genuine i wo 

... ■_■_:_) d,* m umnr t TrltfV 


Lawyers have obtained legal 
ridte^tody to^baiyof 
three, daims against McDon- 
alcTs from people who say h® 1 

drinks cateied serious bums. 
One damiant, a disabled man, 
gays be strffiared dnrd^ree 
barns after coffee spilt in fos 
W'McDonakrs said safety 
was its priority- An Amencfu 
woman who was scakfcd by 


ip* 


ifor ns 




unoer uus - . nrrd woman wbo was scawcu 

ment no one mgpninM n«d Md j M .^,«rffec was award- 

TOfi be dentedSTfcTSflfion. w*®* “> 

rucpi tSL 

amount to the "bi^wtasraidt Mo Mowtam. Jbe Norten 

on poverty and woridessness". jjdand Secretoi* y este ™^ 
She«S tiiatll».weKarestate, 

was failing Britain because^* am*d ar.«ren«&enmg 
_if jt —a fho fwwh of the povvcfs ctf flic Police Author- 

CiL* «w numffs the 


ire bos 


t. i'ter-.fl 


m 


K| 


was taihng onram 

faced a cm in Disaomqr people who daim aisarHuiy,s- J^iat did not match the needs rf the w ^ ^ 

AUowanoe^onecftlteF^- Sedal&ces after their Ito modem world. A third ^ fe^ebo^J^ov^tte 

pal benefits. “ oSfon has improved. P : chikhen ywbon&'rajsed ire Ro^fUfaterCon^^di^as 

aaed after strong oitiasmfcrr estimated - benefitsdooot^-^S" in txwerty and -yet government fct step to rdbnnmg the 

“ ^SgtoTiScd.Hr 

• «n**nt on the allowance sliding ' !S£?S3iitv - £43 bfllion in real.terms since aceonnlaWte to tte public. Dr 


.V 


was bemg paid out 
who were no longer eligible. 
Burt research has shown that 
20 per cent of claimants who 
appealed against cuts in. their 
benefits should not have been 



Speaking in the North East 
last night, Ms Harman said: 
"We are going to introduce a 
change into the benefit integri¬ 
ty project Once the suggestion 
has been made that somebody 
with a disability is going to 
have their benefit reduced at 
that point an independent 
extra check will be made to 
make sure that the decision is 


care and to help wim mommy. 

The care allowance is paidout 
at a higher rate erf £4930 a 
week,amiddle rate of E33JO 
and a lower rate of £I3J5.,T1 k 
mobility allowance is paid xwt 
at a higher rate of £34.60and a 
lower rate of £3.15. The review 
is targeting^■ people .daimmg 
the higher mobilily rate and 
the higjho' and middle rates 
for care. ' ■ ! 

Speaking later at a welfare 
roadshow m Middlesbrough. 
Ms Hannan said that the 
Government would tackle d»- 
crimination through a Dis¬ 
ability Rights Commission. 


1979. ^ 

It also emerg ed wat me 
Government is prepa ring to 
launch an E8 mtllian advprtis- 

I Blair's mentor 

scheme to help more young- I 
off wefiare and into 


fon* and maimg “ 

accountable tx> the pubbe Dr 
Mowlam also oufl ined wa ys 
of developing partnerships 
between-the pofiee and the 
community. 




k-J« 






sters . uu . TTkii».k —-— — 
work. Mr Blair is bretong a 
breakfast for teaditig mdustnr 
alists today and tomorrow at 
Downing Street 

Officials say there has bon 

a good respemsei with big 
firms such as Sainsbuiys. 
British Aerospace, Bntish 
Steel and WH Smithinytrfved. 



v * v > * ^ ' ’ : 

• ■*.' V‘.: ■ : 


• . 


. ■; 


Old sewers 
‘ruining 
water 
supplies’ 


Benn 

Blair 


Xony Blair's former house¬ 
master at Fettes CoUege in 
E di h lw rgh. cited by me 
Prime Minister as a major 
influence in his Ufci has bem 
appointed ch ai r man of the 
National Heritage Memorial. 
I%)d.'ErK Anderson 61, now 
Rector of Lincoln : .College, 
Oxford, wflt be responsible' 
for directing E250 million a 
year, of lottery money to 
heritage projects. He sue- 
ceeds Barai Rothschud. 









Bland evidence 


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trust Halifax to make them a tax-free return 


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By Phiiip WEBSTER. POLITICAL EDITOR 

tony BENN accused the a less weD-known 
correspondent prime Minister of systemati- figure- rai^.^ 

callv repudiating the beliefs of calls for^ disciplinary action. 

CRUMBLING sewer syaens ^neKSTast nighL The but Mr Benn is one of a groi® 

are rendering vtot.waler re- l^togeT^hvays of virtually licensed *ssent' 

sources uxtoer Britain’s big | ^dns^ does not era. There is no.desire to make 

favour personal attadcs. but 
. ..._ifirti Annual 


are raiuciu, 6 .- 

sources under Britain^ bs_g 
cities unusable. The dann « 
made by researchers, MPs, 
— and organ- 


health 


X ts »■**- 

_ have launched a 

campaign to accelerate uie 
repair of the ageing network. 

Green and wildlife groups 
believe tapping *5 huge un- 

, -> aquifers ana 

below cities like 
Liverpool and 


delivering the 16th ann ual. • 
Attlee lecture he left hiS_ audi¬ 
ence in no doubt that in . his 
view Tony Blair does not 
match up to the "greatest 
leader, the Labour party has 
ever had". 

Attlee was a man ot charac¬ 
ter and integrity *S*Me, an¬ 
swers, unlike todays, shallow 

■ mi alimVC 


oi YlTUiAlij 

ers. There is no.derire to make 
a martyr bf him..-. 

Mr Benn said- “Today all 

dement Attlee stood for is 
being systematically repudiai- 

ed \f$ New Labour, rat we 
would do wdl to compare 
vriiat he believed in wrffiwhal 
is now presented to ns as the 
radical asdre of British poli- 
tics supposedly ccranritlKl to 
modenusiog our society. . 


Hamilto n Bland, the BBC's 
*vmoe of swiimnixig^, _ to* 
given evidence: to the solioto 
investigating allegations of a 
conflict of interest over; Nat- - 
kraal Lottery money awarded 
to ~~ Amateur Swnmning AfflO- 
nation pools, desjnte suffer^ 

mg a brain haemorrhage. The 

sraritor, a partner at City - 
■London lawyers Hertot 
Smith, will present his mid- > 
ings to the ASA on Fdwuaiy. 

: 27. They wfll'bemadepuWK: 

Hamed?s princess- 

Prince Naseem Hamedi the 
world featherweight boring;; 
rha m p km- married .■lus jpri- 
friend, Eleasha Elphi ngstone, 
24, a liajidrESser. in acuenW'; 
ity so. private that even the „ 
bride's mother was not 
presestA spokesmur for the 
boxer, 23,-who fives i» Shef 
field, said the wedding cere- 

_nirfm 




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London, wnere me ****-- 
is rising since the departure ot 
heavy industry from the capv- 


y muujuj ---— 

tal, “groundwater cannot ue 
extracted to meet water short¬ 


ages because 
polluted". 

The Campaign 


it is 


for 


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Renewal of Older Sewerage 
Systems (Cross) estimates mat 

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are in need of urgent attention. 
The group says that for every 
£1 spent on leaking water 
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LJiarier, anu iw ucw w *».»,«- 
ington, in 1950, to wam Presi- 
dott Truman against the use 
of atoznic weapons in Korea. 
A few days ago atoother Lab¬ 
our Prime Mmister ffeW to 
Wasfongton to pledge his foil 
support.for President Clinton 
in launching .air ' strikes 
against ltaq, in dear cratfra- 
ventiah of tte t|N Quarto - . - ; 

Mr Atflee dH not possess 
r-charisma “which is now re¬ 
garded as'a pre-requisite' for 
. fcose■. setting .office,- but - m 
1945 he defeated a man who 
certainly. did_possess it : (Win¬ 
ston Ctuirdulfl- He was, a man 
" of character and integrity.” 


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\ 


THE TIMES TUESDAY FEBRUARY 10 1998 


RK 


HOME NEWS 3 


r 


Witness says Diana was unconscious 


Mystery motorcyclist may have been found, reports Ben Madntyre 


DIANA, Princess of Wales 
was unconscious from the 
moment her our hit a concrete 
pillar in a Paris underpass, 
according io new testimony 
from a raoionydist, who 
chums that he came itr her aid 
within seconds of the crash. 

Eric Petel saw no other 
vehicles in die tunnel, despite 
forensic evidence suggesting 
dial the Mercedes had collided 
with a Plat Una However, his 
testimony, if confirmed, pro¬ 
vides important clues to the 
speed of the Mercedes, the 
time gap between the crash 
and the arrival of the pursuing 
photographers and the Prin¬ 
cess's medical condition imm¬ 
ediately after the accident. 

M Pete! told Vbicz magazine 
that he was driving his motor¬ 
cycle at about llOkph when, in 
his rearview mirror, he saw 
the Mercedes Dashing its 
headlights at the entrance to 
the road tunnel beneath the 



The Mercedes in the aftermath of the fatal accident 


Place de I’Aima. *T got the 
impression that the car was 
still far behind me.” At almost 
the same moment the heavy 
limousine shot past him. 
When he heard the “deafe 
noise” of the impact. M 


28, said he initially thought his 
motorcycle had hit something. 
”1 looked down at my motor; 
there was nothing. I then lifted 
my head and saw the end of 
the accident 

“Fran the position I was in. 


French concerned over 
treatment at accidents 


FRANCE'S Health Minister 
conceded yesterday that there 
was a debate within the 
French medical establishment 
over on-she treatment in emer¬ 
gencies, such as that given to 
Diana, Princess of Wales, 
becuise of the delay in gating 

victims to hospitals. 

Surgeons in particular have 
been critical of the treatment. 
Bernard Kouduasrsaid. How¬ 
ever. there were no dissenting 
voices in the case of the 
Princess/'Unfortunately, 
there was nothing more to do.” 

The minister was answering 
questions at a luncheon at the 
Anglo-American Press Associ¬ 
ation of Paris. He said he did 


not believe a report that rescue 
workers spent up to 45 min¬ 
utes stabilising the condition 
of the Princess at the accident 
site before taking her to hospi¬ 
tal. The report is contained in 
a new book. Death of a 
Princess: The Investigation, by 
Time magazine correspon¬ 
dents Tom Sancton and Scott 
MacLeod, which is being 
serialised in The Times. They 
claim that, from die time of the 
accident, 30 minutes after 
midnight, it took an hour and 
45 minutes to get the Princess 
to a hospital operating room. 

The Princess, who suffered 
massive bleeding from the left 
pulmonary vein, was taken to 


La Pitie Salpetriere hospital. 
She was pronounced dead at 
4am. The book quotes physi¬ 
cians who claim that her life 
might have been saved with 
speedier, and more competent, 
hospital care. 

Frederic Mailliez, the doctor 
who treated the Princess at the 
scene, when asked yesterday If 
she would have died if she had 
been rushed to hospital, said: 
“It was hopeless. There was 
nothing we could do to save 
her." He told ITN: “I couldn't 
have done anything else than 
what I have done on this 
accident and I think any 
doctor would have done exact¬ 
ly the same thing.” 


I cuuJd see the whole tunnel, 
right to the exit," M Ffctel said. 
“As far as I'm concerned, there 
was no other vehicle in front of 
the Mercedes.” However, he 
conceded: “It was dark, you 
couldn’t see much. 

“I saw a woman. She had 
slid off the bade seat Her head 
was resting between the front 
seats. Her bad: was turned to 
me. I could see only her hair. I 
was afraid the car would burst 
into flames. I went into the car 
and pulled the woman up¬ 
right. putting her head bade 
on the rear armrest. Blood 
was flowing from above her 
right ear. 

”1 brushed aside the hair in 
front of her face. Her eyelids 
fluttered, but she did not open 
ha eyes. I asked her whether 
she was all right, but she did 
not answer. It was then that I 
realised this was Lady Di." 

Tom Sancton and Scott 
MacLeod, the two Time maga¬ 
zine journalists who have pub- 
lished a book on their 
investigations into the crash, 
have pointed out that none of 
the other witnesses who arri¬ 
ved immediately after the 
crash saw anyone opening the 
car door. 

M Pad said he drove his 
motorcycle the wrong way out 
of the tunnel to the nearest 
telephone box and called the 
police. Several witness have 
said they saw a motorcyclist 
tearing the scene of the 
accident. 

“If this is the guy, that 
answers one of the questions, 
which is the identity of this 
mysterious motorcycle driv¬ 
er.” Mr Sancton said yester¬ 
day However, he added that 
Void routinely pays for stories 
and that several “witnesses" 
have come forward to sell 
information that has turned 
out to be bogus. 

Book extracts, pages 15-17 







Eric Petel, who claims that he was first person to arrive after the crash in the tunnel 

Dodi ‘cash for baby’ claim 


By Stephen Farrell 

THE woman who claims 
Dodi Fayed fathered her child 
said yesterday that he gave 
her E75JXW. Diane Holliday, 
a hotel consultant, denied 
accusations by M chanted Ai 
Fayed that her story was a 
“cruel and wicked lie” to trick 
him into believing her 15- 
month-old daughter Marrd 
was his grandchild. Scotland 


Yard is investigating allega¬ 
tions of deception over £5,000 
that the Harrods owner gave 
her while checking her 
claims. 

Mrs Holliday. 36, from 
Little Saxham, Suffolk, said 
yesterday that she had a five- 
month romance with Dodi 
Fayed after meeting him at 
the Rilz Hold. Paris, in De¬ 
cember 1995 and gave the 
baby up for adoption in 


America soon after the birth 
on November20,1996. 

She said: “Dodi was 
Mann's father. I have a DNA 
test to prove it and Motaamed 
Al Fayed knows this foil wdL 
Mohamed organised the 
test* 

She daimed Dodi Fayed 
gave her £50^000 when she 
planned an abortion and a 
further £25400 when he 
learnt she had given birth. 


Fine for nursery 
where boy died 


By A Correspondent 


THE owner of a nursery 
where a toddler drowned in a . 
shallow pool of water was 
fined £4,000- yesterday for 
breaching safety rales.. . . 

Carolyn Brown .'23*■ was 
also ordered to pay costs of 
more than £2,400 by magis¬ 
trates in Blackburn. Lanca¬ 
shire, after she pleaded gnilty 
to three charges brought by 
the Health and Safely Execu¬ 
tive and Lancashire County 
Council. She was running 
Hilltop Bunnies Nursery in 
Belmont, near Bolton, in July 
last year, when Akx Rae. 20 
months, was found uncon¬ 
scious on a tarpaulin covering 
an ornamental pond. 

His mother. Catriooa Rae. 
38, from Chortey. Lancashire. 


said tire fine was a disgrace 
and called for childcare to be 
more tightly policed. 

An inspection by tire Health 
and Safety Executive found 
tbe'<'nursery- premises -were 
unsafe because of the 20ft by 
10ft pond and a wall with a 
drop behind iL 

John Batty, for the prosecu¬ 
tion. said that Miss Brown 
was the only qualified person 
present when there should 
have been at least three. Also, 
she was looking after nine 
children of whom four were 
under two, when the permit¬ 
ted number was three under 
two. 

A verdict of accidental 
death was recorded at an 
inquest last month. 


BA workers contest 
race-hate sackings 


FOUR British Airways work¬ 
ers carried out a racist cam¬ 
paign against Irish and Asian 
colleagues, awarding Nazi- 
style Iron Crosses to . others 
who partidpated’-'trt" their- 
abuse; a tribunal was told 
yesterday. 

Barry Fitzgerald, Christo¬ 
pher Mason and Malcolm 
Clark, all flight operations 
workers at Heathrow, also 
presented a black spot to other 
employees if they had been 
friendly to people of ethnic 
minorities, the tribunal in 
Croydon was told. 

All three were sacked in 
September 1996 after their 
alleged regime of abuse and 
victimisation came to light 
The men are claiming 


By Adam Fresco 

dismissal against BA, com¬ 
plaining that -their alleged 
victims were not forced to give 
evidence in front of them. Mr 
Fitzgerald haEP worked with 
the airline for--26 -years, Mr 
Mason far 21 years and Mr 
Clark for 27 years. 

Maggie Beilis, who sat in on 
the men's disciplinary hear¬ 
ing, said the decision to sack 
the three, along with a fourth 
man, Anthony Stead, who is 
not before the tribunal, was 
taken because “there was no 
evidence to suggest that their 
behaviour would change, nor 
would they acknowledge that 
their behaviour could have 
been offensive” 

Vivian Gay, representing 
the airline, told the hearing: 


“There was a practice that 1 
will refer to as black-spotting. 
It was complained of and 
found that a practice, habit or 
custom had grown up where¬ 
by -'Employees;^particularly 
Fitzgerald and Mason, pro¬ 
duced on their computer and 
presented to other employees a 
blade spot if they lad been 
friendly to people of ethnic 
minorities, principally Irish.” 

All four men applied to the 
industrial tribunal, but Mr 
Stead is in the process of 
withdrawing his claim. 

BA maintains that “there is 
a wealth of material” to sup¬ 
port the claims that the three 
men hate campaign against 
foreign colleagues. The hear¬ 
ing continues. 


The man with 
money to burn 


By A Correspondent 


AN ACCOUNTANT with a 
rich wife stole money they did 
not need, then burnt thou¬ 
sands of pounds in his coai fire 
and flushed more cash down 
his lavatory.— 

Alex Cope. 41, was jailed far 
twoyears yesterday for embez¬ 
zling more than £64.000 from 
his employers at a computer 
company, but Cardiff Crown 
Court was told that he had 
hardly benefited., 

Mary Parry-Evans, in miti¬ 
gation. said: “Cope did not 
need the money, as his wife 
eamt a salary of £80,000 and 
had inherited a large amount 
This is a very unusual case; 
We are not dealing with a 
normal criminal. He discard¬ 
ed this money in a bizarre 


manner to punish himself. He 
wanted to be caught toatime.” 

Cope, who was suffering 
from depression, transferred 
money from the account of 
B and G Software^ of 
mouth, Gwent into his gold- 
card account He used some to 
pay off debts, then destroyed 
more cash and gave thou¬ 
sands more to charity. Final¬ 
ly, he confessed to his 
employer. 

The consultant accountant, 
of St Andrews, Bristol, admit¬ 
ted eight thefts and era? at¬ 
tempted theft. Judge Peter 
Jacobs (grid him: “It is dear 
you are not a normal criminaL 
But the effects of these thefts 
on this small business must 
have been devastating." 


It was a 
bad race, 
not fraud, 
jockey 
tells trial 

By Lin Jenkins 

THE champion jockey Kieren 
Ftillon yesterday denied delib¬ 
erate^ losing in a race to gain 
an advantage in another. 

The jockey, who rode 204 
winners last season, told a 
High Court libel jury that he 
had expected to win a race in 
which he was accused of 


He said his ride. Top Cees, 
came fifth because of misjudg- 
ment rather than lack of effort. 

Mr Fallon and the trainers 
Jack and Lynda Ramsden are 
suing MGN Limited, publish¬ 
er of The Sporting Ufa, over 
what they say was a “savage 
onslaught” in the paper in 
May 1995. 

The jockey told the court 
that Top Cees had been going 
so well in the lVmfle 
Swaffham Handicap at New¬ 
market in 1995 that he had 
thought “the race was mine at 
airy time". 

The race, however, had 
begun fast and near the finish 
there were no gaps through 
which to get to the front When 
there were, his horse could nor 
quicken. Tired horses were 
rolling around all over the 
place. I could not ride a proper 
race,” Mr Fallon said. 

Weeks later, horse' and jock¬ 
ey won the £40.000 Chester 
Cup and the day after that 
victory The Sporting Life ac¬ 
cused Mr Fallon of cheating in 
an editorial headlined “Con¬ 
tempt for the punter”. 

The paper said his actions 
had been "effectively con¬ 
doned” by the Jockey Club, 
which had exonerated him at 
an. inquiry. The jockey. Mrs 
Ramsden. trainer of Top CCes. 
and her husband, a successful 
gambler, were “merely ex¬ 
ploiting a system that rolls 
over and lets them tickle its 
tummy like some soppy pup¬ 
py”, it added. 

The newpaper’s allegation 
of cheating made Fallon 
angry. “You do your best to 
win and when you get not-nice 
articles written about you, you 
read them and very nearly 
believe it." he told the court. 

The hearing continues. 

Raring, page 45 



Fallon: was confident of 
. victory early in race 


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TIMES TUESPA YFEBR UARY 1019 98 

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Inquiry as 
girl finds 
foetus in 
cupboard 
at school 

By Gillian Harris 

an investigation is 
under way after the discovery 
of a preserved human foetus 
in a school science laboratory. 

The foetus, with the umbili¬ 
cal cord attached, was in a jar 

in the laboratory cupboard. It 
was found by a 13 -year-old 
pupil at Douglas Ewart High 
School in Newton Stewart, 
Dumfries and Galloway. 

After he was alerted to the 
foetus’s existence, the head 
teacher. Jim Judge, called the 
police, who removed it from 
the school. 

Kenny MacLeod, director or 
education at Dumfries and 
Galloway council, said yester¬ 
day. "It has been estabUshed 
that a preserved human foetus 
has been in the school’s biolc^ 
gv department for some 15 
years. It is understood that the 
specimen was prepared at 
least 50 years ago." Mr Mac¬ 
Leod added that the education 
department was also carrying 
out its own investigation. 

Luisa McGuffie, who made 
the discovery, said that at first 
she was curious about the 
foetus. She and her friends 
went back into the laboratory 
when the science teacher had 
gone to get a better look. “The 
thought of this wee life lying m 
that jar was just horrible/ 

A spokesman for the school 
said that pupils of Luisa’s age 
would not have been expected 
to study the foetus. It was kept 
for children sitting GSCEs 
and Higher examinations. 

Brian Wilson, the Scottish 
Office Minister For Education, 
said yesterday: “This is unac¬ 
ceptable and 1 will await the 
education authority's findings 
with interest" 


lOOmph, but with El's Mettle Datahe can send 
and receive his e-mails and faxes at lightainggpeed 






■Hie forever young ones 

^30 singles tog^ 

Vitamin 
due to 
beating 
cancers 


All work and no 
play makes Jill 
a stressed girl 

Women overwhelmingly believe that men still get ., 
tVip better deal out of life, reports Ian Murray 






He could have been on any road, anywhere at any time, but 
Advanced Messaging pager found him. He stopped and phoned the caller. 



^SirJortSheS^officTisdown south No problem AJsmg 
BTs Mobile Data the day s sales orders are there the sameday 



WOMEN say their life is all 
work, little play and even less 
passion. They are depressed 
about their looks, worried 
about their health, frequently 
stressed and overwhelmingly 
believe that men have the 
better deal in life. 

The findings are from re¬ 
plies sent in by 5.000 women 
to a survey conducted by the 
magazine Top Sante in associ¬ 
ation with Bupa. the private 
health insurer. They show that 
SI per cent of women think 
they are expected to perform 
far too many roles and that 
only 19 per cent are interested 
in a career. 

Nevertheless 7 per cent ot 
those who answered the sur¬ 
vey were directors and 33 per 
cent were in management. 
Overall. 74 per cent had a full¬ 
time or part-time job, 21 per 
cent were housewives and 5 
pier cent were students. 

Financial pressures meant 
that, even though 75 per cent 
would like to grve up work, 52 
per cent of those with children 
said they would welcome the 
chance to cany on with their 
careers on a job-share basis. 
About 30 per cent said they 
would like to stay at home 
with their children all the 
time. Only 12 per cent said 
they would opt to send their 
children lo a day nursery and 
3 per cent would employ a full- 
rime nanny if they had the 
means. 

Some 35 per cent of die 
women took at least nine days 
off work each year because of 
stress, and a further 44 per 
cent said they frequently felt 
"stressed out". Half of them 
said their jobs caused them the 
greatest stress and another 42 
per cent cited money worries. 


Relationships with their part¬ 
ner or husband worried 36 per 
cent of them and 30 per cent 
were concerned about their 
children. 

Only 20 per cent of the 
women believed that their 
husband was a “new man" 
and 52 per cent of those 
working full time said they did 
most of the housework. Men 
helped out equally in only 10 
per omt of households. 

The men also under- 
performed in the bedroom. 
Only 20 per cent of the women 
said their sex life was fantastic 
while 53 per cent said they 
were "still waiting for the sex 
of their dreams". Some 63 per 
cent said their partner was not 
a wonderful lover. 

On average the women had 
sex seven times a month and 
half of them said they wanted 
more. Ten per cent said they 
regularly faked an orgasm to 
please their man. while 60 per 
cent said they never did. Only 
25 per oent said they thought 
about sex daily and 58 per cent 
said they did so "occasional¬ 
ly". According to the maga- 


* jj e W orts two days a week at home. But with Mobile Extension his 

caller thinks he’s in the office. 



Gibson: an ii . 
to keep fit and 


rine. "most women are too 
exhausted by life to think 
abotrtsex”. 

Some 88 per cent of women 
said they felt depressed about 

their looks, and only 6 per cent 

claimed that they were very 
attractive. Being overweight 
was a major problem, with 67 
per cent unhappy about their 
shape and 66 per cent lacking 
confidence when naked. Half 
b&ieved they were overweight 
and 77 per cent said they had 
dieted at some time in their 
life. 'With 73 per cent believing 
that men preferred sUra 
women, the survey found that 
68 per cent loathed their 
waistline . and 57 per cent 
disliked their thighs. 

The highest proportion (56 
per cent) were happy about 
their eyes and 38 per omt with 
their hair. Only 10 per cent 
rarely wore makeup, while 53 
per cent put it on daily. 

There was widespread disil¬ 
lusionment with the NHS; 64 
per cent believing it had 
deteriorated in the past 20 
years and 89 per cent willing 
to pay an extra penny in the 
pound in tax., to improve it. 
Some 75 per-cent, however, 
believed that iU-heahh could 
be overcome by a positive 
mental attitude and 56 per 
cent said they had visited an 
alternative medicine practitio¬ 
ner such as an osteopath- 
Asked who their health role 
model was, a large majority 
said Diana. Princess of Wales 
was seoi as the most inspira¬ 
tional woman in the world 
followed by Cindy Crawford. 
Mel Gibson was, voted the 
most inspirational man in. 
looking andfeeling fit 


' by Ian Murray 

MEDICAL CORRESPONDENT 

SUNLIGHT'' and salmon 
could help in the treatment of 
breast cancer, researchers 
fcavediscowfred. Both keep up 
the level of vitamin D in the 
body, and trials have shown 
this is crucial in reducing the 
growth of cancer cells. 

Barbara Mawer. Professor 
of Bone and Mineral Metabo¬ 
lism at the Manchester Royal 
Infirmary, has found that 
advanced breast-cancer pa¬ 
tients with a high level of the 
active form of vitamin D in 
their blood have a better 
survival rate than those with 
low levels. Working with a 
grant from the Association for 
International Cancer . Re¬ 
search, she monitored two 
groups of 13 women with the 
disease. One group with high 
or normal levels of the vitamin 
survived the six months of the 
triaL Five out of the 13 in the 
other group died. 

The incidence of breast can¬ 
cer is lower in areas with 
sunny climates, and one of the 
most important actions of 
.sunlight is making vitamin D- 
When exposure to the sun is 
sufficient, dietary sources ot 
the vitamin are not necessary 
to build , up sufficient levels or 
the vitamin. When people are 
ill, however, they may not go 
out into toe sun. enough and 
become deficient in the vitar 
min. Oily fish such as salmon 
or mackerel, can supplement 
the amount needed. Taking 
extra supplements tan bedan- 
gerous. causing side effects 
such as kidney stones. . 

Professor Mawer said that 
b uild ing up the vitamin in toe 
blood appeared to to be a 
worthwhile treatment for can¬ 
cers in the breast, prostate and 
pancreas^ However, ensuring 

levels did not drop below toe 
norm might- , prevent the dis¬ 
ease frbm developing. How 
the Vitamin restricted growth 
was not yet dear.. . 



4 

4 


Leading artide, page 19 ‘ Medicine Chest page 16 


Cellulite creams branded useless 

_ hut its nroduct Cellulite Massai 


By Our Medical Correspondent 

PRODUCTS sold for reducing cellulite 
are more likely to reduce the bank 
balance than shrink thighs, according to 
Health Which?. Tests on ten leading 
creams found that they had no effect on 
subcutaneous fat. 

The Consumers' Association magazine 
says that because cellulite is so little 
understood, the beauty industry is keen 
to promote cures for getting rid of it 
However, six-week tests by volunteers 
found that toe creams only made toe skin 
feel smoother or softer. 

Costs ranged from E9.95 for 200ml of 
Boots's brand to £27 for 200ml of 
Lancorhe or Estei Lauder products. A 
Superdrug cream used in the control cost 
£1.99 for 200ml. Each tested cream was 


pot in an unmarked container and the 
cheap cream, with no c l a im to reduce 
cellulite, in an identical one. The volun¬ 
teers rubbed the cellulite cream on one 
leg and the cheap prod uct on toe other. 
They reported no differenc e in ' the 
amount of cellulite and four preferred the 
cheap version. 

Qaims about toe value of toe creams 
varied- Dior did not mention the word 
cellulite on toe packaging of its Svelte 
Perfect, but said that “very soon toe 
silhouette is refined" , and Che cream 
would “reshape the desired areas". 
Clinique daimed that its Firm Believer 
reduced the appearance of-dimpled • 
orange-skin peel.- Elancyi said that its* 
Intimate Minceur would “help signifi¬ 
cantly reduce' the . appearance _ of 
ceDalUe". Body Shop made no dauns. 


but called its product Cellulite Massage 
Oil: Claims by some that the cream 
would shift fatby breaking it down were 
dismissed by two Which? dennatoF 



simply by being applied to toe skin, they 

re ^^Omsumers' Association asked to 

manufacturers: for dijiicai- proof 
their products worked, but some of the 
theories, put forward “bore no Rs®^ 
Hancp in any proven fads”. Bstc& lAuqer 
and Clinique sent no evidence. _• 
"Making cellulite- disappear wjto a 
□ream is apg^tiing,butvirtually impbsSr 

. use tautum. : before. spending lots _ of 
* money on uy f cefiufite treatment If ft. 
-sounds to be -too* good to. be true, it 
■ probably is,T . •. • : ; ’• ' . : - -'' : ' 


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THE TIMES TUESDAY FEBRUARY 101998 


HOME NEWS 5 




priest over 



ByRissell Jenkins 


A CLJRATE.has taken early 
retirement before being-forced 
to resign, twer idsrelationship 
wifoa,female Baptist 6rdi- 
'wnd’.sent.-iD-. : his. parish cm- 
wo^ experience; 

- The . Rev John. Hargreaves, 
55, is leaving- St Barnabas's 
Ctorrch in ppenAjwi.-Maa- 
Chester, three years altar Ju¬ 
dith Pajak; 38. a ; mother -of 
thre^ -was sent to.him .for 
training. Hiswife, Cynthia. 
52;'-a^''h^\star^-'(fiviQit£.' 
proceedings, for unreasonable 
behaviour; blames the break- 
downof Iheir 2S-year-cld mar* 
riage-ctn the friendship when 
Mr. Hargreaves was vicar of a 
parish in Rochdale. The dio* 
ceser made . clear -that Mr. 

- Hargreaves decided to retire 
before he was asked to resign, 
and his. licence , to., minister 
revoked. 

The Hargreaveses’' inar- 
1 rfagegotmto difficulties when 
he was at St Peiert Churdi in 
;NewbpId.Rochdale.••He. <rf- 
. fared to resign biit was per¬ 
suaded. -to. take .on the less 
.demanding ixjst -of curate at 
anofoer ebtireb while he sort- - 
ed cart his problems. ' 

' ? Mts Hargreaves; who has - 
. three chiliherv novv lives apart 
from her husband in the 
Rochdale area: She Says thietr 
marriage was firm until Mrs 
Pajak arrived in foe parish. 
“Wecelebrated mir25fo wed¬ 
ding, anniversary in July. 1994 
and even went on a : second 
honeymoon to Israel Every¬ 
thing was fine, we couldn't 
have been happier.. 

“Then Judith Pajak started 
at the church in September. - 
She was always: ■ calling ; 
around to foe . vicarage or 
ringing up late at night, when 
I had gone to bed. l£she went.. 
away for a week. ; she would 
ring him'eveiy night. :• 1 
. “In July 1995 he went with 
her to the solicitor^ so she 
could start divorce proceed¬ 
ings against her . husband. 
One day. in Mardi 1996, I 
came home from work and: he 
had taken almost everything." - 

Mr Hagreaves moved to. . 
Baa^p, Lancashire, and he; is 
turn, started divorce proceed- ; 
mgs for unreasonable behav- 



Pajak is __ 

below, for thebreak-up of her marriage to*John 


Cynthia Hargreaves, 



four..Mrs Hargreaves, wfici 
underwent a mastectomy after 
breast cancer was diagnosed, 
said that the couple decided to 
drop their divorce petitions to 
dissolve the marriage amica¬ 
bly. She says Mr Hargreaves 
then told her that he wanted to 
continue his relationship with 
Mrs Pajak with a view, to 
marriage; . •' . 

“I wis so stunned I almost 
collapsed arS had to.he-treat- 


ed for shock.” she said. “He 
made a promise to me then 
that he would support me and 
lode after me. Now all he gives 
me is £60 a month. I am on 
income support.’ 1 

- Last night her husband was 
unavailable for comment His 
solicitors said that they had no 
comment to make. Mrs Pajak, 
who lives in Rochdale, said: "J 
am not: going to talk about 
this.”. • :• . . 


Innocent 
clergy 
are told 
to trust 
in God 

By Ruth Gledhiul 

RELIGION CORRESPONDED 

VICARS who are falsely ac¬ 
cused in sexual gossip should 
team to trust in God that the 
truth will out. dergy of the 
General Synod of the Church 
of England heard yesterday. 

The Rev John Banner, vicar 
of Holy Trinity. Tunbridge 
Wells, said: “I have been in 
one thousand different situa¬ 
tions. from a woman in one 
house who stripped herself 
naked, to a curate who derid¬ 
ed be would get all foe 
unmarried women together in 
foe parish haO and give them 
a field day. I found myself 
visiting them one by one 
afterwards and faring all 
kinds of accusations.” 

Mr Banner, who is mar¬ 
ried, said: ‘Thank God I have 
been entirely protected. At 
some tune, we have got to 
trust God.” He was once 
called at 2am to visit a suicidal 
25-year-old girl: “I was there 
lh hours trying to persuade 
her not to take foe pills. Then 
there was gossip. 

“f have been accused of 
giving a lady a baby at one 
stage. My solicitor said, ‘Walk 
away from it, ft wfi] go away, 
trust God.’I did, I have, and l 
am still here.” 

In a rare; separate meeting 
of the Convocation of Canter¬ 
bury, foe ancient parliament 
of foe Church, the dergy were 
meeting to discuss proposals 
to reform church discipline. 
Next year, the Synod will be 
asked to deride whether new 
tribunals should meet in pub¬ 
lic or in private if they replace 
the current system of church 
courts. 

Canon Alan Hawker, au¬ 
thor of a report on dergy 
discipline, said that the 
Church was not trying to 
avoid washing its duty linen 
in public “There is foe issue 
of innocent dergy being un¬ 
duly tarnished by public 
proceedings.” 

Afterwards the Rev Bill 
Beaver, the Church’s director 
of communications, said: “All 
priests walk a fine line when 
they are in a pastoral situation 
of which they are not in 
control Every priest has 
got all lands of stories like 
this:" . . ... ... 


Rare breeds trust 




By Helen Jo hnstone 


PIGLETS? kept by .a rare 
breeds conservation trust 
were so starved that they ate 
carcasses. 'from ffietr own 
herd, a court was told 
yesterday. 

An RSPCA video played to 
the court showed 44 weaner 
piglets crammed into a small 
shed, with some starting to 
devour {aglets' that bad re¬ 
cently died. The saddlebacks 
■were kept in sordid conditions 
with no food, bedding or 
water, magistrates weretold. 

The RSPCA discovered foe 
weaner pigs, a White Park 
cow and some sheep in a 
skeletal state, shivering in 
ramshackle sheds at foe 
trust’s site in Dunsmore, 
Buckinghamshire, like only 
evidence of food was frozen 
lumps of garlic butter. 

Adam Driver, a vet who 1 
treated the .animals, told 
Amersham Magistrates* 
Court: “Two piglets which 
woe dead and being 
cannibalised, in my opinion; 
endured suffering before 
death.” He stud that foe 
conditions in foe shed foil, 
below British and EU welfare 
standards. ' - „"••• 

David Hobbs; an RSPCA 
inspector, said he.had visited 

the site in November 1996 and 
found .foe weaner pigs kept in 
a concrete building with no 
in foe window. “Some 
of the pig? stood shivering 
and a number of pigs were 


attacking foe carcasses of two 
other dead weaners. There 
was no evidenceof any feod;- 
water or bedding." v ; * - 

David Walkfes; SS, one of 
three men who ran foe site, 
said many of the pigs did riot 
belong to the. trust- He said 
foe piglets were contained fix a 
shed to stop thorn running on 
to a road. He added that he 
was being unfairly picked on 
by Mr Hobbs. 

Mr Watitiss, of PrestwootL 
Buckinghamshire, denies 42 
charges relating to causing 
unnecessary suffering. 
Jeremy Smith. 30, of Monks 
Risboitmgh, and James Coz¬ 
ens. 42, of Princess 
Risborough, deny 28 charges 
as owners of permitting un¬ 
necessary suffering to ani¬ 
mals. The trial continues. 



’WatkfSS: denies causing 
sowing to animals 





Quantocks ban 
to shoot 100 deer 

By Michael Hornsby, agriculture correspondent 


TWO West Country farmers 
have admitted shooting 100 
red deer between them since 
the National Trust banned 
staghunting on its land in foe 
Quantodc Hflis last ApriL 

■ Ben Bartlett and Robert 
Rowe, both members of foe 
Quantock Staghounds, said 
yesterday that they had to cull 
the deer, between August and 
November last year, to protect' 
their crops ban use hunting 
-was no longer allowed as a 
method of control. 

• Opponents of hunting, and 
some other farmers, accused 
foe pair of being barbaric and 
greedy and of using emotional 
blackmail to tjy and get the 
staghunting ban lifted. 

Mr Bartlett, who farms at 
Over Stowey, Somerset, said: 
“Without hunting, we have no 
choice but to cull foe deer to 
keep their numbers down to a 
level,where we can afford to 
allow them on our Land. 

“Non-hunting farmers and 
landowners have been culling 
deer for years to protect their 
land, but when hunting farm¬ 
ers, who have preserved foe 
deer in foe past take the 
same action/tnere is aB hell to 
pay.” 

Mr Rowe, whose farm is at 
Spaxton, said: “It is not re¬ 
venge. We are not saying ‘I 
fold you so.’ 1 know it is sad, 
hut we are not going to feed 
. foe deer for nothing. We 
cannot afford to. In the past we 


have put up with £5,000 of 
crop damage a year for the 
sake of the sport and the good 
of the deer.” 

The two farmers argue that 
hunting is the best way of 
controlling deer because it 
stops the herd growing too 
large and keeps the animals 
an the move, preventing too 
many from congregating in 
any one place. Deer are classi¬ 
fied as pests and can legally be 
shot by fanners. 

But other landowners yes¬ 
terday accused the two men of 
breaking an agreement on 
how many deer should be 
culled. Michael Fry. a neigh¬ 
bour of Mr Bartlett, said: 
“These are people who profess 
to love deer. This is barbaric 
It is pure greed. They sat 
round foe table with us and 
agreed how many deer should 
be killed” 

Hugh. Warmington. chair¬ 
man of the local deer conser¬ 
vation group, said hopes of 
securing agreement on a deer 
management phui had been 
“blown apart”. He added: “Ill- 
feeling is running very strong¬ 
ly. I feel very unhappy about 
it, not just for the deer, bur for 
the whole community.” 

The National trust banned 
saghunting after receiving a 
report commissioned from a 
Cambridge scientist stating 
that deer suffered extreme 
physical stress during foe 
chase. 


runs short of sailors 

j^ubligjope$jo : igg^ British 
^officers, reports Audrey Magee 



BRITISH naval officers are to 
he targeted for recrialment 
into the Irish Navy to help to 
overcome a staffing crisis, m 
the seven-strong fleet . 

The Irish Navy, which cele¬ 
brated its fiftieth anniversary - 
two years ago. Wants to tempt 
ten officers wfth watcnkeepine 
experience to leave foe Royal 
Nlvy fleet of 130 vessels, 
including submarines. * 

. vacancies for ten executive 
officers to jam foe RgwblicS. 
naval service /will appear in 
foe British Navy press within 
the next few wedcs. /. . 

The Irish Navy, whidi £ 
having an. eighth vessel,buut 
al a shipyard in Devon; 'is 
offering £20.000 a year plus 


aflowances-for going to sea to 
sadors ef sub-lieutenant rank. ’ 
trdaodV long tradition of 
supplying .combatants to the 
United "Kingdom'S Armed 
Forces has been, reversed 
because, of staffing difficulties 
caused by low morale. The 
navy is unable to retain senior 
officers who, fed up. and 
frustrated, are leaving to lake 
up jobs iatiteprivatesector. 

Thie' Irish Government 
hopes to avert any further loss 
by advertising in magazines 
such as Navy News, the 


monthly newspaper for for¬ 
mer and airrem servicemen. 
Commonwealth countries 
such Australia and New 
Zealand. regularly advertise 
for staff in the paper. The 
tabloid, wrfo a circulation of 
85,000, has also carried re¬ 
cruitment advertisements for 
the Sultan of Oman’s navy. 

Navy sources suggest that 
Ireland’s crisis is far deeper 
than the need for ten more 
officers. It is in desperate need 
of modernisation and ns ratal 
force of about 1,000 is below 


M strength. A report by Price 
Waterhouse to be published 
soon is expected to recom¬ 
mend .foal the staff is in¬ 
creased to 1200, a radical 
overhaul of procedures and a 
complete replacement of foe 
fleet during foe next 15 yeans. 

Although Ireland espouses 
neutrality, it needs a modern 
navy to patrol fishing rones 
and detect the sophisticated 
gangs smuggling drugs into 
Ireland by sea. 

Hie Republic's Navy com¬ 
prises foe flagship Eithne and 
six other vessels: Deirdre, 
Enter. Aoife, Aisling, Orla and 
Clara. Two of them were 
former Royal Navy patrol 
ships in Hong Kong. 


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6 HOME NEWS 


THE TIMES TUESDAY FEBRUARY 101998 


Primary pupils 
to face national 


TONYBAftrHOLOMgjV 


tests eveiy year 


MOST primary school pupils 
will face national tests every 
year from the age of seven 
under plans announced by 
government advisers yester¬ 
day. malting English children 
the most tested in the Western 
world. 

Nine out of ten schools are 
expected to use optional tests 
for nine-year-olds in English 
and mathematics this sum¬ 
mer. The Qualifications and 
Curriculum Authority will 
now pilot similar tests for 
eight and ten-year-olds. 

With “baseline assessment" 
due to start at the age of five 
and compulsory tests estab¬ 
lished at seven and 1 i. only six- 
year-olds will be sure to avoid 
national resting before the 
siart Df secondary education. 
A decade ago, many children 
passed through primary 
school with no formal testing. 

Nick Tate, the authority's 


Educationists 


are convinced 


regular checks 
will improve 
standards, says 


John O’Leary 


chief executive, said the new 
tests had been developed in 
response to strong demand 
from schools. There had been 
a “sea ■change" in teachers’ 
attitude to national testing, as 
schools looked for a reliable 
measure of their progress. 

Opinion polling carried out 
for the authority showed that 
95 per cent of teachers found 
the tests in mathematics and 


Council to fund 


assisted places 


By David Charter and Mark Henderson 


A CONSERVATIVE council is 
to become the first to replace 
assisted places at independent 
schools as they are scrapped 
by the Government. 

Surrey County Council is 
setting up a trust fund to 
provide free independent 
school places for up to 200 
children from low-income 
families, the same number of 
pupils who benefited annually 
from the abolished Assisted 
'Places Scheme. The council 
plans to give the schools the 
EI.S00 it receives from the 
Government for each child. 

It said the scheme showed 
the spirit of partnership be¬ 
tween state and independent 
education which ministers 
were calling for. In return for 
subsidised pupils, indepen¬ 
dent schools will be exported 
to offer master classes to other 
siaie school students, or open 
up sports or specialist facilities 
to them. 

The move comes months 
after the Government carried 


out its election pledge to phase 
out the Assisted Races 
Scheme, which helps 34.000 
pupils, and divert the 
£140 million saved into reduc¬ 
ing infant class sizes. 

A spokesman for David 
Blurtkert. the Education Secre¬ 
tary, said: “We will seek 
derails of the Surrey scheme, 
but we are not keen to see local 
versions of the Assisted Places 
Scheme." 

Andrew Povey, chairman of 
education in Surrey, said: “We 
are seeking to build on the 
good aspects of the Assisted 
Places Scheme and the good 
aspects of what goes on in 
Surrey. 1 hope David Blunkett 
will understand what we are 
trying to do here.” 

Many independent schools 
are attempting to replace their 
assisted places to preserve the 
social mix of pupils. Under the 
largest scheme. Girls’ Day 
School Trust is hoping to raise 
£70 million to cover the 3.000 
places at its 25 schools. 


science reliable and useful. 
Even 76 per cent of English 
teachers, whose opposition 
sparked a union boycott five 
years ago, considered Che tests 
of 14-year-olds useful. 

Dr Tate said the pressure on 
teachers to improve results 
was partly behind the change. 
“In terms of a recognition that 
the tests are here to stay, are 
useful and are playing a major 
role in raising standards, I 
think this is very striking." 

Results from last summer’s 
tests demonstrated their value 
in exposing national weak¬ 
nesses. Dr Tate said at a 
London briefing. Pilot tests for 
nine-year-olds in 270 schools 
confirmed the view of Chris 
Wood head, the Chief Inspec¬ 
tor of Schools, that perfor¬ 
mance dipped in the middle 
years of primary school. 

Shortcomings were most 
obvious in mathematics. Dr 
Tate said. But only 67 per cent 
reached the standard expected 
of a nine-year-old in reading. 
5S per cent in writing and 55 
per cent in spelling. Most 
nine-year-olds could spell 
words such as “over" and 
“number”, but the success rate 
dropped to 15 per cent for 
words such as "aeroplane", 
"height" and “unusual”. The 
same group of children 
achieved much better results 
for their age when they were 
tested at seven. 

In mathematics, only 59 per 
cent of children achieved the 
standard expected for nine- 
year-olds. when more than 80 
per cent had reached the 
expected level at seven. The 
authority said almost half the 
sample Bailed to make the 
expected progress between the 
ages of seven and nine. 

Analysis of the nine-year- 
olds’ answers showed difficul¬ 
ty with fractions and in adding 
or subtracting sums of money 
of more than £1. 

The Government has 
pledged to ensure that SO per 
cent of 11-year-olds will 
achieve the level expected for 
their age in English and 75 per 
cent in mathematics by 2002. 
Dr Tate said that while the 
progress of eight and nine- 
year-olds needed attention, he 
was confident the target would 
be reached. 



University 
issued 
by student 
accused of 
cheating 


By John O’Leary 

EDUCATION EDITOR 


Latter-day adventurers: Keith Reynolds and Brian Milton in the GT Global Flyer ready for the round-world trijr 


Remembering a flight of fancy 


By Paul Wilkinson 


ALMOST two centuries ago a 
Yorkshire engineer persuad¬ 
ed his coachman to switch 
burn driving horses to the 
riskier enterprise of flying his 
experimental gliders, de¬ 
signed and built in a summer 
house at Ms country estate. 

The reluctant coachman 
quit and returned to his 
horses after breaking his leg 
in a flight which covered just 
141 yards in 1810. But his 
example has inspired two 
British pilots to attempt be- 
come the first to fly a 
microlight around the world. 
Their trip, in honour of the 
aviation pioneer Sir George 
Cayley, is a little longer — 
more than 24,000 miles ~ 
and they plan to complete it 
in 80 days. 

Yesterday they set off on a 
proving flight from a cow 
pasture at Sir George's ances- 




Early bird: one of the first glider designs by die aviation pioneer Sir George Cayley 


oral home at Brampton Hall, 
near Scarborough. Their des¬ 
tination was Berlin, home of 
another pioneer, Otto Ulcn- 
thaL who used Sir George's 
ideas more than 60 years 
later. His flights approached 
a quarter of a mile. 

The flight, a tribute to both 
men, by Brian Milton and his 
copilot Keith Reynolds, is the 
fust long-distance trip by the 
GT Global Flyer which they 


intend to use for the round- 
world trip, starting from 
London next month. Unlike 
Sir George’s unpowered glid¬ 
er, however, the open-cockpit 
aircraft is powered by a 
L 200 cc. SObp engine, and 
cruises at around 65mph- 
Mr Milton, 55, a financial 
journalist from London, is 
already the holder of the 
record for the longest and 
fastest microlight flight, trav¬ 


elling from London to Syd¬ 
ney in 59 days. His 45year- 
oid copilot, from Rochester 
in Kent, is a former British 
natooal hanggfiding. cham¬ 
pion and a Civfl Aviation 
Authority test pilot 
- Tlwyplan to By to, Athens, 
over Ite- 

northern India :tfr Hong 
Kong, then across; China to 
Japan, Russia and Alaska, 
returning via Iceland in July~ 


A STUDENT who was denied 
a degree after being accused of 

cheating is going to cwn in 
an attempt to force Cambridge 
University ra award him the 
qualification. 

Kamran Beg is believed to 
be the first student to chafl- 
flnge the university in court 
over allegations of plagiarism. 
He was accused of copying 
part of an essay which counted 
towards a one-year postgradu¬ 
ate degree ra finance at Trinity 
College. 

A solictor for Mr Beg.'-who 
is stogie and in his early 30s, 
denied that he acted dishonest¬ 
ly. Jaswinder Gill said that his 
dient had inadvertently omit¬ 
ted attributions or footnotes to 
passages he had quoted. “He 
is taking Ids grievance to the 
High Court to get his degree 
and to dear his name." 

Mr Beg's case was rejected 
by Cambridge’s court of tfisd- 
pline and its court of appeal, 
the Septemviri. No further 
right of appeal exists. He has 
been granted leave to chall¬ 
enge foe university's decision 
at the'High Court in London. 
Cambridge has almost two 
months to respond before it is 
derided- whether the case 
should go to a hearing. 

. Mr GDI said that Mr Beg 
-had never accepted the allega¬ 
tions made against him. “He 
says he feels violated by what 
has happened. He put in a 
year* work and then didn't 
get the qualification right at 
foe end. He is very intelligent 
and has been at the top of the 
dass ail of his Iife.” 

Mr Beg has a first-class 
degree in. engineering from 
Manchester and a masters 
qualification. Although he 
achieved high, rnarksr in three 
examinations at Cambridge in 
1996, he was told that he criuld 
not be awarded foe qualifica¬ 
tion because be had plagiari¬ 
sed other people's work in his 
assessed essay. 

■ Urn.. Mead, who heads 
Cambridge's .administrative 
service, confirmed that a.writ 
hadcfceea served. He :stad: 
“Thejutfrnrraity. 1$. taking jffie 
matter very seriously. The 
university has not to my 
knowledge, been taken to 
court in this way before.” 


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THE TIMES TUESDAY FEBRUARY 101998 


HOME NEWS 


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Peacekeeper who lost leg is denied compensation 


A BRITISH soldier who lost a leg 
on UN peacekeeping duties in 
Bosnia Balled in his High Court 
battle for dmqmsation yesterday. 

A judge rejected accusations by 
Sergeant Trevor Walfeec. 32. that the 
Ministry of Defence acted “unfairly 
and perversely" when it refused to 
compensate him, even though die 
United Nations' would eventually 
reimburse the cost 
Mr Justice Latham expressed 
considerable sympathy for the argu¬ 
ment that it ws& surprising that the 
Ministry of Defence bad felt it not 
„ . . appropriate to mend ftsoompensa- 

Walker yesterday, was tion schemefo peacekeeping forces, 
given leave toappeai But the judge said it tfidnot apply to 



Bosnia alone and British soldiers 
might be required to ad as peace¬ 
keepers in areas where there was no 
such indemnity. “In these circum¬ 
stances J cannot categorise die 
policy as irrational or perverse." the 
judge said. 

However, he agreed to give Ser¬ 
geant Walker, from GilUngham. 
Kent, leave to take his case to the 
Court of Appeal on the ground that 
it raised issues of public importance 
and could affect other service 
personnel 

During last week's hearing, 
David Paimicfc. QG appearing for 
Sergeant Walker, had described to 
ti\e court die "appalling events” of 


May 1 1995. when a Serbian tank 
opened fire on Maglaj School, 
which served as an observation post 
and accommodation block. Ser¬ 
geant Walker, then a corporal in the 
Royal Engineers engaged in road 
building, was seriously injured and 
underwent 13 operations. His right 
leg was amputated above the knee 
in January 19%. He was likely to be 
invalided out of the Army before the 
end of his career, the judge raid. 

He had an “exemplary" disciplin¬ 
ary record and was described by his 
commanding officer as a first-class 
soldier “of almost unlimited poten¬ 
tial to achieve high rank and a full 
career", who had borne his pun 


“with enormous fortitude and has 
been an example to us all". 

If invalided out. ii was estimated 
that he would receive a pension 
gratuity of about LZADOO and an 
annual pension of about £ 11500 . 

In Otaober 19%, the ministry 
refused io pay him compensation 
under its Criminal Injuries Com¬ 
pensation Overseas Scheme. The 
judge described how d» scheme, 
introduced in 19S0. was meant to 
give injured members of the Armed 
Forces serving overseas compensa¬ 
tion equivalent to what they would 
have received if they had become 
the victim of a crime of violence in 
Britain. It did not provide awards 


Award of £57,000 


for service personnel injured by ads 
of violence occurring “as a result of 
war operations or mifitaiy activity 
by warring factions” 

The judge ruled that, although the 
tank attack that caused Sergeant 
Walker's injuries was a crime of 
violence, it also amounted to mili¬ 
tary activity and fell wiihin the 
exception to the compensation 
policy. 

He also rejected accusations that 
the ministry had unfairly failed to 
alert serving soldiers that the 
compensation scheme had been 
changed by 1994 to exdude peace¬ 
keeping activities such as those in 
Bosnia. 


RICHARD PQHLE 


by air disaster 

Adrian tee reports on the end of a nine-year battle 
lor compensation by traumatised Kegworth rescuer 


A FORMER Royal Marine 
was driving home from work 
when a Boeing 737 crashed 
before his eyes. He was the 
first to enter the wreckage and 
what he saw. that night has 
haimted him ever since. 

• Fbrtyseven . people died 
when the British Midland jet 
attempted an emergency land¬ 
ing at East Midlands Airport 
Leicestershire, nine years ago. 
Yesterday Graham Pearson, 


39. was awarded £57,000 com¬ 
pensation for the trauma he 
has suffered after going to the 
aid of survivors of the 
Kegworth air diraster. 

. Since the crash Mr Rsarson, 
who spent nine years in the 
Army, including two toms to 
Northern Ireland, has suf¬ 
fered post-traumatic stress, 
tost his job and had marital 
difficulties. Mr Justice Gar¬ 
land, sitting at the High 


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Rescuers at the Kegworth are disaster nine years ago 


Court, said of amount he was 
entitled to award against the 
airline: “Our system of law is 
not generous m people forced 
to live a recurring nightmare." 

The judge said he had no 
doubt that Mr Pearson, who 
needed hospital treatment, 
had lost his job as a kitchen 
salesman because of what he 
saw during the “appalling 
tragedy". 

The court heard that Mr 
Plsarson, a father of four from 
Hull, who was with his wife. 
Rose, when the crash hap¬ 
pened. spent the night pulling 
survivors from the wreckage 
and. in particular, aided an 
injured mother and her baby. 
He later received the Royal 
Humane Society's bravery 
award, but suffered feelings of 
guilt loss of interest in life and 
lack of concentration. 

. The court was told that 
when he witnessed a motor¬ 
way pile-up on his way to 
workin J994. he was unable to 
stop and help because of his 
memories of the air disaster. 

. Mr Ptearson said yesterday: 
“I feel very relieved. The legal 
process has taken nine years 



Graham Pearson outside the High Court yesterday. He said the award “will enable me to lay the ghost to rest" 


and every solicitor's letter, 
every contact with the defen¬ 
dants, reminded me of the 
plane crash.” 

He said he had never re¬ 
ceived a letter of thanks from 
British Midland. "As from 
today. I feel it will enable me to 
lay the ghost to rest” 

Graham Turnbull, a psychi¬ 
atrist who worked with the 
victims , affected by the 
Hungerford massacre and the 
Lockerbie and Hillsborough 
disasters, 'examined Mr Pear¬ 


son and found that he was a 
strong character who was 
trying to deny to himself the 
profound effects the experi¬ 
ence had had on him. 

The judge said Mr Rsarson 
needed periods in hospital for 
treatment and eventually de¬ 
cided to study for qualifica¬ 
tions so that he could find a job 
in youth and community 
work. 

“1 have no hesitation in 
finding tljat the plaintiff lost 
his job because of the prob¬ 


lems associated with post- 
traumatic stress disorder." Mr 
Justice Garland said. 

The judge awarded him 
almost the hill amount of his 
claim for damages, toss of 
earnings, studying for a new 
career, travel and hospital 
bills — a total of more than 
£40.000 plus interest over six 
and a half years. 

Earlier. Mr Pearson, who is 
now a youth worker, broke 
down as he recalled the acci¬ 
dent His counsel. Paul Rose. 


said the claim was modest, but 
British Midland said he was 
only about £200 worse off. 

At least one of the survivors 
has said that he owes his life io 
Mr Pearson. After the crash. 
Donat Desmond described 
how Mr Pearson used a dog 
lead to stop the flow of blood 
from leg wounds while he 
comforted other injured pas¬ 
sengers. “Just to hear another 
human voice kept me this side 
of eternity," Mr Desmond 
said. 


Woodward running out of cash 
for $2m battle to clear her name 


By StewartTEndier 

LOUISE WOODWARD may not be able 
to afford -a full legal- battle in the 
American courts to dear her of killing 
Matthew Eappen. her parents said 
yesterday after flying back from the 
United Slates. ■ 

Speaking at their home in Elton, 
Cheshire, Gary and Susan Woodward 
said that funds contributed by well- 
wishers were disappearing rapidly. The 
thousands raised have been seriously 
depleted over the months since the ]9- 
year-old former an pair was convicted of 
second-degree murder last autumn. 

■ The conviction was reduced to involun¬ 
tary manslaughter by Judge Hiller Zobet 
after the trial. A prosecution challenge to 
the reduction in verdict is to be hea rd on 
March 6 in Boston. Massachusetts, 
where the baby died a year ago 
yesterday. • 

The hearing will also consider a 


defence appeal for her involuntary 
manslaughter conviction to be over¬ 
turned. Judge Zobd's reduction of her 
life sentence to one of 279 days covered 
the time she had spent in prison awaiting 
trial. It meant she could be free to leave 
die United States as soon as the appeal 

process was completed. 

Miss Woodward has said she wil] slay 
as long as it takes to prove her innocence, 
because she does not want to return 
home with a criminal record. If her 
appeal fails, her family would Eke to 
fight for a retriaL 

Ken Davey. vicar of Elton and chair¬ 
man of the Louise Woodward and 
Family Trust which lodes after money 
donated to the Louise Woodward Cam¬ 
paign for Justice; said die fund total 
currently stood at about £200,000. He 
said this would cover the appeal but not 
a retriaL which would cost about $2 mil¬ 
lion (£12 million). 

The EF au pair agency, which initially 


placed Miss Woodward with the Eappen 
family, paid for the legal costs of her trial 
but ended its financial support in 
January. Medical experts who testified 
for die defence have offered their services 
free to speak at the appeal and say papers 
outlining Che evidence of her innocence 
will be published in relevant journals 
and on the Internet 

Mrs Woodward said yesterday. “If the 
prosecution aren’t successful and the 
judge’s derision is upheld and they don’t 
grant our appeal either, then that means 
that she will come back to this country 
with an involuntary manslaughter con¬ 
viction and Louise will have to go on with 
her life with that hanging over her head." 

Mr Woodward said he had been surp¬ 
rised by his daughter’s abDity to cope 
with a year of trauma. “She has matured 
beyond her years this past 12 months. 1 
don’t know how she has done il She 
amazes me sometimes — her strength 
and character. We are very proud of her." 


Black holes appear 
at the White House 

By Nigel Hawkes. science editor 


“Last 


Baghdad 
package 
tour is a 
hostage 
to fortune 

By Robin Vocnc 


THE Foreign Office advised 
yesterday that “no one in rfteir 
right mind” should take a 
package holiday to Baghdad 
at present. A parly scheduled 
to leave at Easter has yet to 
cancel its plans. 

MPs fear that lour is is 
would be likely io be taken 
captive by Saddam Hussein as 
human shields, which hap¬ 
pened during the Gulf War. 
but the holiday organiser says 
that he still has no shortage of 
lakers for the visit. 

The £1.350 trip, arranged by 
Phil Haines, from Twicken¬ 
ham. southwest London, in¬ 
cludes a flight by Koval 
Jordanian Air io Amman and 
then a four-wheel-drive jour¬ 
ney imu Iraq. The travellers 
are booked io stay at the four- 
star al-Rasheed Hotel, where 
the BBC reporter John Simp¬ 
son watched a missile soar 
past his window at the start of 
the last conflict. 

Highlights of the trip in¬ 
clude a Baghdad city tour, an 
outing to the purported site of 
the Garden of Eden and a boa: 
trip to the Basra marshes. 
According to Mr Haines. 12 
people are in the party, includ¬ 
ing two solicitors, an archaeol¬ 
ogist. a London firefighter, a 
chef and a policewoman. 

He hopes ihat their sortie 
will be the first in a series of 
such package deals he plans to 
offer. He said yesterday that 
he might cancel it if the 
siruation worsened. 

However. Ann Winterton. 
Conservative MP for Congle- 
(on. said: “1 am amazed that 
anyone should consider it." 
Michael Fabricant Conserva¬ 
tive MP for Lichfield, said: 
“They might not only have to 
face the risk of being taken 
hostage, but also a shower of 
American and British smart 
bombs.” 

A Briton held hostage in rhe 
Gulf War. John Rartenbury. 
68, an agricultural consultant 
from Inwardleigh, Devon, 
said: “It does not seem very 
sensible. There are enough 
troubles without going look¬ 
ing for them." 

Turks move in, page 13 


minute 




STEPHEN HAWKING has 
been invited to speak at the 
White House by President 
Clinton. 

The Clintons and 180 invited 
guests will hear Professor 
Hawking, who is disabled by 
motor neurone disease and 
speaks through a voice 
synthesiser, give a lecture 
about what science can 
achieve in the next century. 

A White House spokesman 
said: “Stephen Hawking was 
chosen because his work 
centred around time and sci¬ 
entific discovery — he seemed 
a natural choice to talk about 
time during the passing of the 
millennium." 

Yesterday Professor Hawk¬ 
ing. Lucasian Professor of 
Mathematics at Cambridge, 


was keeping the contents of 
his lecture secret. It will take 
place next month. 

A new edition of Professor 
Hawking’s bestseller A Brief 
History of Time is to be 
published to celebrate the 
tenth anniversary of its publi¬ 
cation. The book made history 
itself as the longest-running 
bestseller, spending 237 weeks 
in the top ten and selling six 
million copies worldwide. 

The new edition, to be 
published in June, has been 
revised by Professor Hawking 
fo include the latest findings. 
“But the basic message re¬ 
mains the same: we haw 
made remarkable progress in 
understanding the universe 
and this is something we 
should share." 


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8 HOME NEWS 


THE TIMES TUESDAY FEBRUARY 101998 


Clean-cut killer 
of Louise Smith 
is jailed for life 

DNA trapped eloquent murderer who had evaded 
justice for 15 months, reports Simon de Bruxelles 


DAVID FROST was the type 
of young man you could take 
home to your mother; a prom¬ 
ising engineering student who 
was eloquent and sociable. 
But 18-year-old Louise Smith 
never got to take him home to 
her mother — because he 
raped and choked her after 
they met by chance on Christ¬ 
mas Day two years ago. 

Miss Smith’s parents and 
brother have not celebrated 
Christmas since, and yester¬ 
day they dung to each other as 
Frost. 22, was jailed for life 
after admitting murder. 

Detectives said that Frost, 
the dean-cut son of a retired 
bank official, was not an 
obvious suspect for the mur¬ 
der. At first he denied any 
guilt, bur finally he decided to 
act “honourably" and he 
began to confess how he had 
raped and murdered Miss 
Smith before dumping her 
body in a quarry. 

Detective Sergeant Gary 
Davies, who brought Frost 
home from South Africa to 
face justice, said after the case: 
“You would think he was a 
very pleasant young man. If 
your daughter brought him 
home to meet you. you would 
think that she hadn't made a 
bad choice. 

“He was an intellectual, 
clean-cut young man. He was 
very eloquent But there was a 
much darker side, a side 
which people didn’t see.” 

Miss Smith’s body was 
found two months after she 
had disappeared on her way 
home from Spirals nightclub 
in Yale, near Bristol. Friends 
had offered a lift to the 
intelligent and bubbly teen¬ 
ager. nicknamed Twiggy, but 
she decided to walk. Frost was 
arrested 15 months later, when 


genetic evidence proved he 
had had sex with Miss Smith 
on her last night. 

Bristol Crown Court was 
told yesterday that the Surrey 
University student had avoid¬ 
ed giving a DNA sample for 
more than a year after detec¬ 
tives first visited his home 
near the quarry in Yace where 
Miss Smith's body was found. 
He was eventually persuaded 
to give a saliva swab to police 
in South Africa, where he was 
on work experience with a civil 
engineering firm. When the 
DNA test proved positive, Mr 



Murderer: David Frost 

Davies and another detective 
flew to South Africa, which 
has no extradition treaty with 
Britain, and persuaded him to 
return with them. He was 
arrested at Heathrow last 
April. 

Initially he told police that 
he had left Miss Smith to walk 
home after having consensual 
sex and that someone else 
must have killed her. But, in 
his sixth interview, he Cold Mr 
Davies: “I would like, hopeful¬ 


ly, to conduct this more hon¬ 
ourably. I think everybody has 
suffered enough. I would like 
to say 1 think 1 did rape Louise 
and was responsible for her 
death.” 

He still denied murder and 
said that the death of Miss 
Smith, a clerk, had been 
unintentional. Last Thursday, 
however, he derided to change 
his plea to guilty of murder. A 
charge of rape was allowed to 
lie on the file although Frost's 
lawyer, Stephen Williamson, 
QC, said there was no sugges¬ 
tion that the young woman 
had consented to intercourse. 

Miss Smith's mother fled 
the courtroom in tears as her 
daughters last moments were 
described yesterday. The court 
was told that Frost had been 
turned away from Spirals 
after spending file evening in a 
pub with friends. He came 
across Miss Smith as he 
walked the streets, and began 
talking to her because “1 was 
feeling down and missing 
people. T remember thinking 
she looked extremely attrac¬ 
tive. 1 wished her a merry 
Christinas and asked if she 
minded me walking with her. 
She said no." 

Frost forced the young 
woman into a wood, where he 
raped her. A scream was 
hard by a witness. Frost told 
police: “I didn't want her to be 
upset I wanted to try to reason 
with her and comfort her. I 
was panicking and she was 
crying, making more and 
more noise," 

Frost said he put his hand 
over her mouth and found 
himself pressing on her 
throat **I took my hands 
away. It was too late ... she 
wasn't talking. I didnt want 
her to be dead. I was sorry." 



news in BRIEF 


Stepmother, 26 , faces 


USki 





m awaiti ng an 

Street magistrates nv.London.aad could fere a. We senRare 

iTSST for lrictappmg. ■n.e S0 ldk r «« ^» 

divorced and had custody of the 

went to wo* for him as a nanny. Alter fos r* 

reamed to Leeds and the Hi Court 

the children should live with her. The US Arayk 

withholding a financial settlement believed to beabeww 

$100,000 (£57j0OQ&.‘ set aside for die boys upbringing, 

pending tire outcome of the legal action. . . *- . 

Ex-PC on rape charges 

A former policeman appeared before Bir m ingha m magis¬ 
trates, accused erf six rapes, four other serious sexual 
offences, wounding- and making threats to kffl. MKb&a. 
: .Charles. 49. from Tysdey, Birmingham. retired tromtne 
West Midlands force in 1995 after serving as a unifor med 
officerin the city and in Wolverhampton. He was remanded 
in custody until Fdbniaiy jt There was no application for 
baa.; - " \ • ... .■ : • 

Aid worker in clear 

A British aid Worker wifi not face charges over allegations 
that he "sexually corrupted" an orphan girl in Romania. 
Brian Freeman, 47, from Leicester, heads the House of 
Children charity which has adopted an orphanage at Smaja. 
He was barred from leaving the country Tor 30 days while 


Louise Smith, a bright and bubbly teenager, died after refusing a lift home from friends 


He stripped her, apart from 
her shoes, and hid tiie body on 
a diff ledge that he knew from 
having played there as a child. 
It was found by two Byear- 
old boys. 

Mrs Smith dung to her 
husband, Robert and son, 
Richard, 21, as Judge Rodger 
Bell jailed Frost for life for his 
“evil'* crime. Afterwards the 
family called far a return of 
the death penalty. “I don’t see 
why we should all have to pay 


to keep David Frost alive;” 
Mrs Smith, a shop worker, 
said. 

“When they stopped the 
death penalty. I agreed at the 
time. But now they have got all 
tins forensic evidence and I 
don't think they can make a 
mistake any mare." 

Mr and Mrs Smith gave up 
their jobs and moved from 
their borne in Chipping 
Sodbuiy because it held too 
many memories. Mr Smith, a 


delivery driver, said that they 
had been unable to put. up 
Christmas dererations since. 
“How can. we celebrate the 
anniversary of our daughters 
death?" 

The hunt for Miss Smiths 
killer was the most extensive 
mvestigatfon by. Avon.; arid 
Somerset police. More than 
700 officers were involved in 
the £15 million inquiry, 14500 
people were interviewed and 
•1700 homes visited. 


spokesman said: l “We. have.been told he can leave Romania, 
but we understand he may be staying for some time." 

Actress’s lover lied 

The boyfriend of a former EostEnders actress -admitted 
driving while disqualified and driving without insurance in 
a crash in which she -nearly' lost an eye. Redbridge 
Magistrates’ Court at Dfocd. East London, was told that 
Robot Fernandez, 23; initially tried to escape prosecution by 
idling police that Dannidla Westbrook — who played Sam 
Butcher mlheteleVisHrasoap --bad beta driving. The case 
vwas adjoumed for pre-saxtence reports. . j 

Supermarket apologises 

ri&undnuys has sent apologies to l30,000 loyalty card 
holders at 145 stores that apened ^hroqga the night on 
December 23 and Christmas. Eve. Cosfcnncts complained 


underestimated how many people would tote advantage 
of the-schcsaiei It now keeps 55 stores -pperi throughout 
Fridayfogbts and wifiex&^aBfog^ to more. 

storesnhxt Gnifonas. 1 l 5 ’*-... . 


Grief is unending for the families 




S even years ago .today, 
on a snowy afternoon, 
Sharon Brown kissed 
her sister Vicky goodbye at a 
bus stop. She was the last 
member of her family to see 
the 15-year-old, who vanished 
while waiting for the bus. 

More than 100 police offi¬ 
cers searched the area around 
Vicky Hamilton’s home in 
Redding, Falkirk; divers 
trawled nearby rivers. The 
National Missing Persons 
Helpline used Vicky’s face on 
milk cartons which were dis¬ 
tributed nationwide. 

The American rock group 
Soul Asylum used her picture 
in die video for their 1993 
single Runaway Train. But 
no trace of her was found. 
Lothian and Borders Police 
admit that it is one of their 
most baffling cases. 

Under Scottish Jaw, Vicky’s 
father, Michael, could apply 
to a sheriff to have his 
daughter declared dead. The 
seven years since she van¬ 
ished are all that is required in 


A last kiss and then Vicky Hamilton vanished. Her 
sister is still seeking clues, reports Gillian Harris 


Scotland for a missing person 
to be legally declared dead. 
Mr Hamilton, however, can¬ 
not bring himself to apply. 

He suspects that his daugh¬ 
ter was abucted and mur¬ 
dered, but sees no point in 
having her death made offi¬ 
cial. As a teenager. Vicky bad 
made no will and had no 
estate to divide. 

There is also the fear that a 
move to declare her dead 
might dose the police investi¬ 
gation. At present the file 
remains open, although offi¬ 
cers are not following any 
fresh line of inquiry. 

Vicky’s disappearance has 
put an enormous strain upon 
her family. Her mother. Ja¬ 
nette, who was ill before her 
daughter went missing, died, 
broken-hearted, in 1993. “It 
was three months after it 
happened before she went 


out She just sat and prayed." 
Mrs Brown, 27, said. A cousin 
of Vfckjris. Kevin Thompson, 
committed suicide a week 
after die thud anniversary of 
her disappearance; 

As the months stretched 
into years. Mrs Brown kept 



Vicky Hamilton 


expecting to hear that Vicky 
had been spotted in Glasgow 
or London. She appeared to 
be a happy teenager with 
plenty of friends at Graeme 
High School where she was 
an academically gifted pupfl. 
but Mrs Brown wondered 
whether she might have 
grown bored of small-town 
fife and sought the excitement 
of a dty. 

Posters of Vicky woe put 
up in shelters for the homeless 
in London and prostitutes in 
Edinburgh, Glasgow and 
London were asked to keep an 
eye out for her. The police 
used an FBI computer to 
create a pboto&t picture of 
bow the teenager might look 
at 17 to help people to recog¬ 
nise her. 

But, apart from a handful of 
false leads, there were no 
sightings. "We are left feeling 


angry and confused,*' Mrs 
Brown said. Her 14-montb- 
old daughter, Emma Jane, is 
being encouraged to call the 
teenager in the framed photo¬ 
graph on the mantiepiece 
Aunty Vicky. “It is Stfil as 
much a mystery now as it was 
seven years ago."sheadded. 

Mrs Brown now accepts 
that her sister is dead. Bat she 
believes there is someone 
somewhere who knows what 
happened. The person who 
did it is very dever or very 
lucky not to have been 
caught," she said. 

Today Mrs Brown will 
think about Vicky and what 
she might be like now, as a 21- 
ycar-old starting adult fife. 
The family wifi all have their 
own thoughts, then we wifi get 
on with our lives. We have to 
do that sow. 

“But thar won't stop us 
wondering if one day, some¬ 
thing will turn up to grptain 
what happened. We are al¬ 
ways asking ourselves, could 
this be the vital due!?" 


F or the past texi. years, si 
grieving middle-aged' 
couple nave hired me- 
: chankai diggers .to excayate 
landfill sites, crawled on 
hands and knees through 
’ blocked sewers and plumbed 
disused mineshafts, searching 
for the body of their murdered 
daughter. 

Last night Marie McCourt, 
54, held a candlelit church 
service for the child sheiias 
been unable to buiy. Her need 
for an answer to the question 
that haunts her has not faded. 
since she shouted across a 
courtroom to tbe man convict¬ 
ed of the murder: “Teil .us 
where she is. That is aQ we 
want to know.". . ■ 

_ Helen McCourt, an insur¬ 
ance clerk, was 22 when she 
disappeared 200 yprds from 
her parenor’-home in Bfllinge,. 
near St HefeaX Merseyside; 
rnim 

The landlord _of her local- 
pub. Ian Simms, was found . 
guilty at Uvexpool 'Crown 
Court of her .murder 13. 


Stop*™ • f. sssss 

—- Mra MdCoort has joined 

the question 

;*• / j' . .’(tie mother of the missing 

3L muraerer -r Moors Murders victim Keith 
•-—; :——; - Ba rnett She has campaigned 

won’t answer , 

-- whereabouts of theirvictims, 

nhslater. Pbbce found one . <? -The search hastaken jts.toll, 
her., sapphire and .opal she sulriadtsi. “We stffl go.out 
fogs bloodstained in ttis | searching, but not in the same 
boot and,blood on the pub way as we' did. It is starting to 
r.He denfod the murder, make me ifl. We find bones 
Lrs McCourt, who ha^ has . arid then we have to get them 
tolled mediums in'her examined The, thought that 
ch, said last night feat the - they amid be part of your 
many at St Marys Church child’s body is sometimes too 
ild be a celebration of Jsetf much. \ 
ghlert fife. T still believe Ttisjfike being suspen^d.1 
Will be found one day, buf .'-cuY»;forwud-bK«ise'ram 
ably not in my tifetmae. I .-'Icq* back by stilt wanting.to 


: a murderer 
wont answer 

momhs latd - . Police found one 
of. her.> sapphire and .opal 
earrings bloodstained in his 
car boot and,blood on the pub 
door. He denied the murder. 

Mfe McCourt, who ha$ has. 
consulted mediums in ^faer 
-search, said last night that the 
ceremony at St Mary’s Church 
would be a celebration of iter* 
daughter's fife. T still believe 
she wifi be found one day, buf 
postibly not in my fifefooe. I 


hayp to accept that this may be , bury my daughter. Maybe 
thednsest III come to bwyrng when tha service is over, T will 
.Hdeo-Ian-Simms canpreveErf;. start to live again, I stiffwont 
that happening, but I».<w..;-'.gHe-iiplireK-af-Helea-behe 
prevent us having a remem-. found.* 


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COUNCILS wUl be enowuaged- • 
toadoptdireefiy elected mayors, 
cabinet-style .deaaon-nvakiDg" 
and radira] changesra elections 
untteTjpians for Tarivigqrating 
toeal daBocxacy- pubfished by. - .. 
_ ihe Government yesterday: 

: Yesterday JcimPi-eScotC the 
.Deputy Prime Minister, ga,ve 

there vwll be le^datio n^t - to* 
next pariiamentaiy. session te 
carry out the 'most ixtaisrvc 
revamp ; of local;-: goverinneatA 
-structures since theWth century. 

- “Beinno doubt, we-want to" 
see change m local gdwarnmait. 

wantfo .make toe changes 
ve?'timcjdy,’* he Said. TAtthe : 
end of the .process, iwe want. 
ooundls that represent. their 
people more afii^dy ' khd re-V 
spbirf to Iheir needs." 1 : V' . - . > 

Mr Prescott respects swift re¬ 
sponses to the Governments 
consultation paps' before he . 
brings out a White Papermtbe' 
sunmier. Purdier papers on 
council finance,standards and 
value for money will be pub¬ 
lished fotte corning months. 

Citizens' juries, itmKfing ati-' 
zens* panels and rcferendums 
are praposedr in a.'drive to 
increase public partic^atioa in - 
-local gover nm en t and provide 
dearer leadership and accodnt- 
abfihy. The esiaWishmenr of 
paid exeemive councillors is also 
befog considered; and councils 
am to be given a Any to promote 


John Prescott is seeidng to modernise 
. local government and boost election 
. turnouts. Mark Henderson reports 


.the social, economic and envi¬ 
ronmental weft-being of then- 
areas. ■ 

- The statns quo will not be an 
opdcBL The Prime Minister told 
debates :at the Labour Party’s 
local government conference on 
Sunday that - councils that 
modernised ffibctiwdy would be 
rewarded vrith greater powers, 
whereas ttfosethat failed would 
betargets for go v er nm e n t 
intervention. ■ 

V^OTnrils^be etasarraged to 
reform toe committee system of 
decisionmaking, which dates 
from the last century and is 
thought by, ministers.to waste, 
time and obscure accountability- . 
The executive and re p resentative 
rotes, of coundlias should be 
split the paper argues, creating 
a handful of" executives with ‘ 
dear responsibility for k^r ser¬ 
vices such as education and 
social services, and back¬ 
benchers who wauld concentrate 
on scnitinising.the*‘calmtet n and 
representing theirwards. 

The Gowenament is also “very 
attached" to the idea of directly 
elected mayors, intended to pro¬ 
vide strong executive leadership 


that is dearly identifiable and 
accountable to the doctorate, the 
document says. 

Mr Prescott said that he 
would Eke to introduce salaries 
for executive counaBore instead 
of the present system of allow- 
areas, but conceded that he had 
yet to win this argument with 
fellow ministers. "It may not be 
right for every councillor, bur 
mere is certainly as argument 
for {paying! chairs of committees 
and leaders,'* he said. 

Local elections face a major 
reorganisation tinder the pro¬ 
posals. which explore ways of 
increasing the turnout, which at 
an average of 40 per cent is the 
lowest in the European Union. 
Some councillors in each author¬ 
ity will be elected annually, as 
Labour promised in its manifes¬ 
to. A rolling register of electors is 
being considered, and councils 
will be encouraged to set up 
polling stations ar workplaces, 
shops and railway stations to 
make it easier to vote. 

Other proposals include intro¬ 
ducing ballots held entirely by 
post or with electronic smart 
cards, and extending polling 


hours or moving potting day to 
the weekend. Proportional rep¬ 
resentation for council elections, 
however, has been ruled out, as 
has the introduction of compul¬ 
sory voting. 

Lord Hunt's Loco! Govern¬ 
ment (Experimental , Arrange¬ 
ments) Bill, which has govern¬ 
ment support, will, allow 
councils to adopt many of the 
proposals, such as directly elect¬ 
ed mayors and cabinet govern¬ 
ment. on a pilot basis. 

Hilary Armstrong, the local 
Government Minister, said Thar 
councils would get a new re¬ 
sponsibility for promoting so¬ 
cial, economic and environmen¬ 
tal well-being, which would 
make them the ‘main agencies 
in their areas". The burden of. 
local government finance would i 
also move gradually from Trea-^ 
sury grants towards larger sums \ 
bong raised locally. 

Hammersmith and Fulham 
council in London hopes to 
become the first local authority 
to introduce some of the changes 
and has already drawn up plans 
to appoint a powerful executive 
mayor and cabinet. The present 
roles of ceremonial mayor and 
council leader would be com¬ 
bined. and deputies sitting to¬ 
gether in a cabinet-style 
“mayor's committee" would 
have responsibility for different 
areas of local government dele¬ 
gated to them by the council. 



John Prescott yesterday: “We want to make the changes very quickly" 


Funding reform is key to reviving local democracy 


THE Government's consultation 
paper on local government is the 
most refreshing jfaammt on the 
subject to came out of Whitdall far 
a generation.'- Admittedly, it is 
tentative and lists options rattier - 
than conclusions —.reflecting'a . 
delicate balancing act between 10 
Dooming- Street and the Depart¬ 
ment erf the Environment TYwis- 
port and'the. Rufous; But same of 
the ideas offera chance of breaking 
out of the intellectual stalemate over 
central-local government relations 
that has developed over the past 20 
years. 

Ever since AnfeanyCrosIand said : 
more than 22 years ago that the . 
“party is over" for council spending, 
Whitehall has trampled over Idea} 


authorities. It has irmitwi and 
capped expenditure, centralised 
controls, and abolished the Greater 
London Council and metropolitan 
authorities. This has . been done in 
the name of fiscal responsibaity and 
defending local taxpayers against 
.aQffiedQy extremist and Toony left" 
authorities. The controls, have, erf 
cdorse, afiected Ihe good as well as 
die bad. This has produced a seJf- 
faffiBing decline in local account¬ 
ability as councils have become 
responsible for raising less and less 
erf the money they spend and only 
take derisions at the margin. 

; Maiiy Tories were quite cointent 
seeing little real point In local 
govemnaent Their sohitRm to local 
accountability was to emphasise the 



rights of people to exercise choice as 
consumers of services and as par¬ 
ents rather than through die ballot 
box. Such (Erect choice has many 
advantages over town hall paternal¬ 
ism. But there is still a role for 
councils in providing local services 
and as a regulator. 

- In opposition. Labour spokesmen 
talked of freeing up local authori¬ 
ties. Yet what confidence can voters 
have that their local authority will 
behave responsibly — especially 
when councilors are elected by only 
40 per cent of the electorate? There 


have been loo many cases of 
inefficient and even corrupt coun¬ 
cils to be comfortable with glib talk 
of reviving local democracy. The 
consultative document does not 
propose a return to the days before 
the mid-1970s: "The days of the all¬ 
purpose authority that planned and 
delivered everything are gone. It is 
in partnership with others — public 
agencies, private companies, com¬ 
munity groups and voluntary org¬ 
anisations — that local govern¬ 
ment's future Ees." 

The key is to strengthen political 
links between councils and their 
voters. The Green Paper floats a 
number of sensible suggestions, 
including introducing annual elec¬ 
tions, rather than every four years. 


for those authorities that do not 
have them such as London bor¬ 
oughs, shire counties and some 
districts: the increased use of local 
referendums, citizens’ juries and 
other forms of direct participation: 
executive mayors and a cabinet 
system: as well as improvements in 
elect oral registration and voting 
arrangements to make it easier for 
people to vote. 

It is questionable whether all this 
will be enough in one-party towns 
and districts. John Prescott has 
opposed proportional representa¬ 
tion for local authorities — and 
changes in the voting system are 
brusquely dismissed in a sentence— 
but there is no longer any objection 
in principle after its introduction for 


the Scottish parliament and the 
Welsh assembly. 

Welcome though many of these 
ideas are. there will be many battles 
ahead since Tony Blair's advisers 
are more radical than those of the 
Environment Department. More¬ 
over. these proposals still do not 
address the main financial dilem¬ 
ma. A further consultation paper is 
promised on local government fi¬ 
nance. and there are few hints of 
radical thinking here. But unless 
councils have to raise most of the 
money they spend, and therefore 
have to defend the level of local taxes 
to their voters, any revival of local 
democracy will be limited. 

Peter Riddell 


ADVERTISEMENT FEATURE 


*v-..«' 







Peers told 
of need 
to ensure 
diverse 
press 

James La*dale 

THE Government should 
strengthen the competition 
laws to ensure a free and 
diverse newspaper industry, 
the Liberal Democrat peer 
Lord McNally said yesterday- 

Proposing "his amendment 
to the Competition Bill, Lurd 
McNally, a former political 
adviser to James Callaghan, 
told the House that it was 
needed ro prevent any nat¬ 
ional newspaper abusing its 
dominant marker position to 
eliminate a rival. Freedom of 
the press was an important 
and essential ingredient of a 
free society. "But if freedom of 
the press can be imperilled by 
restrictive laws so it can also 
be threatened by restrictive 
ownership." he said. 

“This amendment has one 
intention — to promote the 
framework of fair and trans¬ 
parent competition in our 
newspaper industry' with the 
intention of sustaining diversi¬ 
ty. quality and choice." 

He said that the amend¬ 
ment was not aimed at any 
particular newspaper or news¬ 
paper group. But he added 
that The Times’s price-curtina 
policy was designed to dear 
the field of its rivals. "What is 
good business for Rupen 
Murdoch is not necessarily 
good sense for a healthy 
democracy or diverse press." 

Viscount Trenchard. a Con¬ 
servative. accused Labour of 
changing its position since 
gaining power. He said that 
the amendment offered an 
opportunity to protea and 
preserve the diversity of Brit¬ 
ain’s national press “for which 
we are admired throughout 
the world". 

But Lord Harris of High 
Cross, a cross bencher and 
non-executive director of 
Times Newspapers, described 
the amendment as “mischie¬ 
vous" and "myopic". He said 
that The Times had sold below 
its cost price for many years 
when its circulation was in 
decline. It was only now, when 
it was enjoying success, that 
the practice was attacked. 


_ tr.E 

31 




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10 HOME NEWS 


THE TIMES TUESDAY FEBRUARY 101998 


Foreign servants get 


right to quit ‘slavery’ 














mCst* 


\igei 

• ,rli« 


FOREIGN domestic staff are 
to be given the right to leave 
their employers under plans to 
curb ill-treatment and im¬ 
prove working conditions. 

The Government is to act 
after complaints from ser¬ 
vants that they have been kept 
in conditions close to slavery 
and have been the subject of 
abuse, cruelty and beatings by 
employers. Most of the victims 
are women from the Philip¬ 
pines. Bangladesh. India and 
Africa who enter Britain as 
part of the domestic staff of 
foreigners. 

Mike O’Brien, the Immigra¬ 
tion Minister, has been hold¬ 
ing talks with organisations 
campaigning for the women 
as pan of moves to tackle the 
exploitation of up to 20.000 
domestic workers in Britain. 
The campaigners argue that 
the present system encourap.es 
staff to leave their job. chayige 
their identity and take other 
work illegally. 

The Government Favours 
changing existing 'rules to 
enable domestic workers to 
leave their employers if they 
are abused and sc-ek similar 
employment. They would not 


Moves to c:urb abu se of domestic 
staff by employers follow reports 
of beafjfhgs, writes Richard Ford 


be allowed,to move into 
another arei of employment 
and wou'.d have to produce 
evidence that they had been 
abused e. r ill-treated. 

Mr 'CVBrien said: "We need 
to increase their protection 
and reduce the possibility of 
abuse, particularly physical 




O'Brien: holding talks 


abuse, of these often vulnera¬ 
ble and low-paid workers." 

A Home Office review has 
ruled out withdrawing the 
1980 concession that allows 
foreigners to bring their do¬ 
mestic servants with them, or 
giving them access to an 
airline ticket home. Under the 
concession, the servant's pass¬ 
port is stamped "employment 
prohibited" and states that 
they were ad mined to Britain 
to accompany a particular 
employer. 

They must work only for 
that employer and cannot 
apply to do domestic work for 
another person. As a result, 
the worker has no indepen¬ 
dent immigration status. 

Those who take advantage 
of the concession are often 
from Middle Eastern states, 
who bring Fiiipina, Indian 
and Nepalese domestic staff 
with them, and those from 


India, Bangladesh and Afri¬ 
can sates, who rely on their 
own nationals as servants. 

A survey of overseas domes¬ 
tic workers who had left their 
employers between January 
1992 and March 1996 found 
that 66.6 per cent were not 
provided with a bed, 62 per; 
cent had had their passport 5 
confiscated by their empki ,y- 
ers. almost 40 per cent ai% a *ed 
physical abuse including b* eat¬ 
ings and 90 per cent had \ jeen 
denied time oft. 

The study, conducted by 
Kalayaan, the campai gn for 
justice for overseas d’orriestic 
workers, found that t’ ne aver¬ 
age number of hours 1 worked a 
day was 17.7, with pf ay of £105 
a month. 

One woman wh'io went to 
Kalayaan was Sat jarah, 42, a 
live-in maid fron'a Mauritius 
with a Saudi fai/opy who had 
to sleep in a corridor without 
berilinen or a jpiflow and had 
her wages of /£.100 a month 
withheld. • ! 

In another 'case a Nigerian 
nanny in Bex'ieyheaih, south¬ 
east Londcr'o., was whipped, 
beaten wittyi high-heded shoes 
and starve^. 


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Michel Terrasse with a self-portrait of his great-uncle, Pierre Bonnard, part of the exhibition at the Tate Gallery 


Master of feelings hated abstracts 


THE great-nephew of Pierre 
Bonnaiti recalled yesterday 
bow the French master used 
to tell him that, unless a 
painting represented some¬ 
thing, it was “a monstrosity” 
(Dalya Atberge writes). 

Michel Terrasse, who be¬ 
came a painter in his own 


right with Bonnard’s encour¬ 
agement said: “He used to 

say to me that art would never 
be able to live without nature, 
that when a painting was 
based on nothing; and didn’t 
signify anything, it was just 
painting for the sake of punt¬ 
ing and had no sense... ‘It is 




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a monstrosity.' he'd say. He 
felt you shouldn’t 'torture 
nature’ so that it became 
abstract." 

Speaking at die Tate Gal¬ 
lery, where a retrospective on 
Bonnard (18674947) will focus 
on him as a 20 th-century 
master, M Terrasse added: 
"He told me that drawing was 
essential because it gave you a 
repertory of shapes to go back 
to; that the medium—wheth¬ 
er oQ, watercolour, gouache— 
was a means, but not an end 
in itself; and that ‘you have to 
know if you are a painter of 
feelings or a decorative paint¬ 
er’. He was un peintre de 
sentiments.” 

Bonnard, he recalled, 
began each day with a large 
glass of cold water and a long 
walk with his dog. That was 
the strict routine before he 
began putting paint to paper. 
M Terrasse said. 

As a teenager, he used to 
join him on those walks, 
noting how the master would 
sod daily take out a piece of 
paper and sketch something 
that caught his imagination: 
"One day, when out walking 
in the h&ls behind his house 
at Le Cannet, he srdd,‘Michek 
you see those olive trees in 
those hills. l Ye looked at them 


hundreds of times. Now. they 
talk to me for the first time.' 
Maybe it’s because it had 
rained. The leaves were shin¬ 
ing and had a special reflec¬ 
tion an them. He took out a 
piece of paper and started to 
sketch." 

M Terrasse. who . often, 
showed his work to the mas- 
ter, has kept letters to his 
parents “saying how im¬ 
pressed he was”: “I've never 
shown those letters to anyone. 
But it was with his encourage¬ 
ment that 1 became a painter." 
Bonnard race asked hint 
“How do you do yonr 
whites?" 

M Terrasse is donating the 
proceeds of his latest boo k.cm 
animals, to tile Brigitte 
Bardot Foundation. 

- From Thursday, the Tate 
will be exhibiting more than 
(00 landscapes, still fifes and 
interiors . from collections 
around the world. M Ter¬ 
rasse saw one of them. Land¬ 
scape with Roof, 194546. 
being - painted. Walking 
round the Tale, he said: “f fed 
my unde is extremely happy 
with the show,” 

□ Bonnard, sponsored by 
EmstS Young, is at the Tate 
from February 12 to May 17; 
£7 (cone £430} 




r 


Sp 


;.v 


Actors fight to save 
the world a stage 


By DA1XA ALBERG& ARTS OORKESFONDENT 


DAMJE JUDI DENCH, Str 
Derek Jacobi, Janet Suzman 
and Lord Lloyd-Webber have 
joined a fight to save the 
Waterside Theatre in Strat¬ 
ford-upon-Avon foam being 
converted into a pub. 

A public inquiry begins 
today to decide whether to 
allow the brewery JD 
Weatberspoan to redevelop 
the site. The theatre went into 
receivership last year. 

Nigel Havers, another actor 
supporting the campaign. 


■ said: “Aren't there enough, , 
pubs in Stratford already?7 ]]■ •* 
Steve Newman, chairman ^ 
of the theatre’s Friends, said ! 

. that in 1926, following the { 
destruction of the origmai.? 
Shakespeare Memorial The-'] 
atre, Stratfordians were irW 
strumental in rebuilding the 
theatre: “We are determined tq 
show that Stratford wants tfaq 
Waterside, not just as a venut 
for visiting professional and 
local amateur performances 
but as an educational centre. 5 ! 


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s fight to sai 
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STACKSof rnewy jjass from 
the Christian forrigper toUte' 
Mas&n twfefi, an. exchange 
anxiously watched by * 13- 
year-old girt with tfiamonds 
of swear on her brow. 

-The Sudanese trader; his 
lap bdried by currenty worth 
aWi wwsa rdatiyittfrec 
Bs merdamdiae 132 s tews . 
Akuac Malong, *c Dinka 
girt.:» among Aon She lias 
spa* seven years enslaved by 
axvArabin northern Sudan. 

Hor .briffiant smite befies 
the beatings, ae8v*tarvat k m. 
mutilation and at te mp ted 
bramwadungsfae endured. “I 
thought B would be belter to 
die man to remain a slave," 
Aknacsays. 

Trafficking in humans has 
iiBBOStfietf again with rivif 
war in Africa’s largest and 
poorest country, according to 
John ESbser or Christian Soli¬ 
darity International, a hu¬ 
manitarian group that bought 
Akuads freedom. . 

For all but a deca de since 
Sudan’s independence in 
1966, s o ut hern rebels, mainly 
blade Christians aod foDowc 
ere of 'tribal reSgtens, have 
fooght for autonomy from the 
national Government in 
Khartoum, which is dominat¬ 
ed by northern Arabs. Hie 
southerners beheve the north 

istiyingto impose Islam and 
the Arabic language and to 
monopotise Sudan's wealth. 

Much of thefightingonthe 
govern m ent side is done by 
local nnGtias. Unpaid, their 
bounty is as<4d aswaritseif— 

slaves. Sudan’s radical Islam¬ 
icleaden encourage sokfiers 
to take daves asthor compen¬ 
sation; according to* Unified 
Nations nxvcstjgator^aacfctfie 
American State D awm eat 
Young warm amvefiSteen 
are the most vafaabfcBoMy. ■ 

■' The Sudanesc Government 
denies condoning rihUrtfiin- 
siting that the prartitte per¬ 
sists because Bnfiding 
prhoaersfbr ransom is a 


i 


v t ^ t?. 







Akuac Makmg shows her i 
freedom after be was paid 


r joy as she is reunited with her mother after seven years and. below, an Arab trader leads 132 former slaves to 
id E&000. Sudan’s radical Islamic leaders encourage unpaid soldiers to take young giris in lien of their wages 


tradition rooted in tribal dis¬ 
putes. But RhiI Malong 
Awan. a regional rebel com¬ 
mander, said enslavement is a 
government tactic to weaken 
the morale and ntflta ny might 
of the south. Many of the 
Macks taken away are 
Dmkas. the biggest ethnic 
group in southern Sudan. 

C hr istian Solidarity Inter¬ 
national estimates that tens of 
thousands of black slaves are 
owned by Arabs m n orthe r n 
Sudan. The Swiss-based charv 
by has made more than a 
dozen risky, clandestine hush 
flights to southern Sudan to 
-redeem 800 slaves since 1995, 
most recently in Madhol. 720 
znQes southwest of Khartoum. 

Akuac's mother, Abuong 
Matong, sobs when she sees 
her daughter for the first time 
in seven years. “It's like she’s 


been born again.** She recog¬ 
nises her only from her 
straight, square teeth. “She 
was very small when she was 
taken, her features have 
changed, bur she came back 
with the same spirit" 

Akuac was sold to an Arab 
who made her wash dothes, 
haul water, gather firewood 
and help with cooking. She 
survived on table soaps and 
slept in the kitchen. “I was 
badly treated," Akuac says. 

Her master also tried to 
make her a Muslim — taking 
her to mosque and giving her 
die Arabic name of Fatima. 
But Akuac says she main¬ 
tained her Christian frith, 
praying and singing hymns in 
secret and never forgetting 
her true name: “My name is 
my name and nobody can 
change that" (APJ 



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THE TIMES TUESDAY FEBRUARY 101998 


af 


Kohl faces new 


campaign to 


postpone euro 


From Roger Bo yes w Bonn 


GERMAN opponents of the 
euro dosed ranks yesterday 
for a final charge against 
Helmut Kohl'S cherished 
project of a common Euro¬ 
pean currency. 

The last-ditch attempt to 
postpone European economic 
anti monetary union — in the 
form of mass petitions, legal 
and technical objections — 
comes at one of the most 
critical periods of the Chancel¬ 
lor's 15 years in power. 

Unemployment has edged 
dose to the five million level 
and has starred rosrir up street 
protests. The possibility that 
these demonstrations might 
link up with an anri-euro 
crusade is spreading alarm in 
the Bonn Government. 

Almost 160 German and 
Austrian professors have 
drawn up a manifesto appeal¬ 


ing for an “orderly postpone¬ 
ment” of the euro and insisting 
that such a delay “has to be 
seriously considered as a polit¬ 
ical option". 

Klaus Kinkel. the Foreign 
Minister, tried to play down 
the appeal. “In September 
1997, 50 famous economic 
professors called for the punc¬ 
tual introduction of the euro 
and gave convincing reasons. 
Now another group is contra¬ 
dicting them. But economic 
reason cannot be swept aside 
by accidental majorities; only 
the arguments count," he said. 

The manifesto, published in 
the form of a letter to the 
Frankfurter Allgemeine 
Zeitung and the Financial 
Times yesterday, coincides 
with the launch of two books 
which will take the postpone¬ 
ment case to the German 


Italy recasts image 
of Renaissance man 


From Richard Owen in rome 


ITALY, brushing aside 
doubts about whether it will 
join the European single cur 
rency in May — not to 
mention accusations that it 
Has massaged its budget fig¬ 
ures in its bid to qualify — 
yesterday boldly launched its 
chosen designs for the euro 
coins to replace the lira. 

Carlo Azeglio Ciampi, the 
Treasury and Budget Minis¬ 
ter. announced that Leonardo 





y.*• *002 ' 


The one-euro coin with 
Leonardo's figure 


da Vinci's figure of Renais¬ 
sance Man would grace the 
one-euro coin. Other winning 
emblems include Sandro 
Botticelli’s Birth of Venus (on 
the 50-cent coin}, Dante 
Alighieri, the medieval author 
of the visions of heU and 
paradise in the Divine Com¬ 
edy (on the two-euro coin), 
and the Colosseum (on the 
five-cents coin). 

Renaissance Man was cho¬ 
sen by the Government, but 
the other images were chosen 
in a telephone vote. Signor 
Ciampi said the Leonardo 
figure offered a sense of 
dynamism combined with 
measurement and the concept 
of service to mankind. 

Arrigay. the national gay 
rights organisation, said it 
was a triumph for “tolerance; 
liberty and diversity in 
Europe" on the grounds that 
Leonardo was a homosexual, 
despite recent reports that he 
may have had a mistress. 


people. One is by Reimut 
Jochimsen. a senior Bund¬ 
esbank director, who is calling 
for the strictest possible inter¬ 
pretation of the Maastricht 
treaty. The Bundesbank, he 
says, will have to pass judg¬ 
ment not only on Germany’s 
suitability for EMU but also 
those of other candidates. 

A second book is a rushed, 
paperback version of the peti¬ 
tion to the Constitutional 
Court lodged last month by 
senior academics. Professor 
Karl Albrecht Schacht- 
schneider, one of the four 
petitioners, has been asked by 
the court to produce 25 copies 
of the 350-page complaint so 
that comments can be sought 
from the Bundesbank and the 
Government That says the 
law professor, is a sign that 
the court is ready to take the 
euro complaint seriously. 

From Thursday, the Ger¬ 
mans will be able to read the 
arguments themselves; tens of 
thousands of copies of the 
petition are being ferried to 
shops in anticipation of rt 
becoming a bestseller. 

The Bundesbank will com¬ 
pile its own assessment and 
this will be the one most likely 
to influence the German par¬ 
liament The calculation has 
been that Herr. Kohl will be 
able to stampede this enabling 
legislation through. The depu¬ 
ties have only three weeks — 
from April 2 to 24 — to prod 
the Bfll through three read¬ 
ings. consultation by six com¬ 
mittees. and pass it in the 
upper chamber, the Bundes- 
rat. 

But the Chancellor has be¬ 
come a weaker political figure 
over the past six months. 
Some older politicians are not 
returning after the general 
elections in September and 
have little to lose by breaking 
party ranks. Others may try to 
boost their standing in the 
constituencies by insisting on 
delay rather than on the 
punctual introduction of a 
weak euro. 


Analole Kaletsky. page IS 
Letters, page 19 


Prince 
thrilled by 
archers of 
medieval 


kingdom 


By Our Foreign Staff 


THE Prince of Wales yester¬ 
day stopped back in time to 
the Kingdom of tfae Thunder 
Dragon, becoming the first 
member of the British royal 
family to visit Bhutan, a 
Himalayan enclave where lit¬ 
tle has changed for centuries. 

Arriving in Bhutan, bor¬ 
dered by India. China and - 
Tibet, is like travelling back in 
time to a medieval realm 
where archery is the national 
pastime and minstrels wan¬ 
der the countryside. 

Bhutan is only slowly open¬ 
ing up to the outside world 
after centuries of self-imposed 
isolation. Modernity . and 
Western influences are dis¬ 
couraged by the British-edu¬ 
cated King Jignie Singye 
Wan gch uck, 42. 

Critic. including Amnesty 
international accuse the 
King of being an absolute 
ruler, bent on ensuring cultur¬ 
al purity. There is no local 
television station and satellite 
and cable television are out¬ 
lawed. The only traffic lights 
have been removed because 
they were not necessary. 

The Prince, who is on the 
final leg of a three-nation 
Asian tour, is one of the 
relatively few people allowed 
to visit Bhutan. He has al¬ 
ways wanted to see the coun¬ 
try and is indulging his love of 
architecture, touring TP’etan- 
styie Buddhist mona- Ties, 
known as dzongs, and will 
trek in the Himalayas. 

At Kyichu Temple, built 
(J00 years ago, the Prince 
stood before one of the holiest 
statues in Bhutan, depicting 
Buddha as a prince at the age 
of eight, and lit a candle. The 
scent of incense filled the air 
as the Prince studied wall 
paintings in natural colours, 
made only Grom vegetables, 
and a red-robed monk ex¬ 
plained the deities represent¬ 
ed by the many statues. 

Next stop was the Ugyen 
Peiri Palace, where the Prince 
was entertained by traditional 
singers and dancers who 
braved an archery display — 
arrows flew over their heads 
— to put on an outdoor show. 

The Bhutanese archers, us- 
ing modem bows, managed 
to hit targets bom more than 
150 yards. 



A masked dancer performs for the Prince of Wales in Paro, Bhutan, yesterday 


Generals * 



with ‘Nazi 
salute 
scapegoat’ 


By Roger Bores 


fc: 


GERMAN - generals - have 
mounted an unusual show of 
solidarity with a tank com¬ 
mander who was moved from 
his post after videos of neo- 
Nazi salutes were filmed by 
soldiers under his command. 

The discreet bit unmistak¬ 
able protest against the ded-^ 
sian of Volker Rflhe, the • 
Defence Minister, to move the 
commander came at the 
handing-over ceremony of the 
13th Tank Grenadier division 
in Leipzig at the weekend. 
Major-General Michael von 
Scotti was posted early after 
tire discovery of privately 
filmed tapes of soldiers raising 
their arms in the Hitler salute. 

The’ general, however, said 
he had not taJten up his post in 
eastern Germany at the time 
of the filming, and his area of 
responsibility . including 
Berlin, Saxony and Thuringia 
— was so wide as to exclude 
personal blame. General von 
Scotti dearly believed he was 
being made a scapegoat far g 
far-nght activities in the Ger¬ 
man army, and many of his 
colleagues seem to share his 
sense of injustice. 

No fewer than 37 generals 
turned up for foe ceremony at 
foe weekend, including Gen¬ 
eral Dieter Sioeckmanh, Nafo 
ctimhiahder for Central 
Europe. They were joined by 
scores of divisional command¬ 
ers arid lower-ranking staff 
officers. When General von 
Scotti thanked “my comrades 
for silently expressing their 
solidarity", the assembled offi¬ 
cers gave him an ovation 
lasting several minutes. At a 
reception later. General von 
Scotti talked of being 
"banned" from Leipzig. The 
city has collected a petition^ 
protesting at tus removal.. ’ 

The Defence Ministry de¬ 
nies that the general was 
made a scapegoat but has not 
offered a satisractory_explana- 
tfon for the southern prating. 
Army sources have long 
known of a group of. conserva¬ 
tive tank officersWho, through 
family connections and regi¬ 
mental gatherings,. keq> in 
toudi with wartime veterans. 

.. Defence Ministry ,'sources 
adnht thd^isa pr^^ ahout . 
how military tradition should 
be interpreted. 




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WORLD 
IN BRIEF 


Chinese 
police 
round up 
dissidents 


Battle resumes in earthquake zone 


Karachi: ' be earthi^-dce in 
northern Afghanistan has 
failed to prevent renewed 
fighting between warring foe 
tions as new tremors forced 
thousands of villagers to flee 
(Zahid Hussain writes). 

A spokesman for therlslam- 
icTaleb&n militia blamed foe 
opposition “northern alli¬ 
ance” for provoking the latest 


dashes in Bang?. 40 mile 
from Takhar province; which 
was devastated by an earth¬ 
quake and aftershocks. The 
alliance denied responsibility, 
saying its forces bad been 
ordered to jdip die rescue 
operation.' • •. 

r The charity M£derins sans 
Frt»n tferesnKKlethetirsr esti¬ 
mate bya foreign aid agency 


of those killed in the disaster, 
putting foe number.at more 
than 4,000, with many more, 
injured or made homdessfl 
Afghan officials said they had 
buried , more than 34SOO 
bodies.. 

„■ There is no independent 
confirmation of foe reports: of> 
fighting but aid agencies said 
they could not be nded out 


Police have begun a round-up 
of China's tiny dissident com¬ 
munity in the wake of the 
arrest last week of Wang 
Bingzhang, an American- 
based dissident who had se¬ 
cretly entered the country 
(Jonathan Mirsky writes). 

Yang Qinheng and Zhang 
Rujuan were held in Shanghai 
after being in contact with Mr 
Wang. ' 


Assassins fail' 


Tbilisi: President Shevard¬ 
nadze of Georgia survived an 
assassination attempt by gre¬ 
nade-launcher on his convoy 
in the centre of Tbilisi yester¬ 
day, foe Iprmda news agency 
reported. (AFP) 


Metro death 


Moscow; A ten-year-old girt, 
who teft a note at home saying 
she was going to kfll herself, 
jumped in front of a Moscow 
underground train. Tass said. 
Police said it was unclear why 
she wanted to die. (APj '. . 


Gang kills ten 


Dushanbe: A gang in 
Tursunzade, near the Tajik 
capital, shot dead two broth¬ 
ers and their mother mid then 
killed seven people at a bus 
stop whom they thought tad 
witnessed foe attack. (Reuters) 


Corsican claim 


Ajacrio: Unidentified Corsi¬ 
can separatist claimed re¬ 
sponsibility for- the killing of 
Claude Erigriac. the island's 
regional prefed; and said 
that the murder was “highly 
political", (Reuters) 


Vintage sale 


Paris: Maxim's announced It- 
will auction 14,000 bottles of 
fine wine— or 20 per cent of its 
wine stock — at its New York 
restaurant on March 7. Some 
of Maxim's wines date from 
around 1800. (API 


SIMON BULL. 


AN EXHlBiTION, 

llTH-1 8 th FEBRUARY. 



* - * w 1U I 


lwc ir.K. tke nr 


Over the to two decades Simon BuD has won widespread 
international aedaim for his unique works of art. 
Hamxis Picture Calleryis-delighted to be able to present an 
exhibition of more than sixty of his colourful pain*** Ja 
. monotype etchings, aU of which, are forsake 
. For more information please^dj 017I-89S 8890 • 


»Tkird Floor;- 





HemtU UrniuL togfrit idgt. SWtX 7X1 












\ 


THE TIMES TUESDAY FEBRUARY 10 1998 


IRAQ 


Zhirinovsky booze cruise to Baghdad left high and dry in Caucasus 


From Richard Beeston 

IN YEREVAN 

ATTEMPTS by Russian parlia¬ 
mentarians to launch an eleventh- 
hour peace mission to Iraq ground 
unceremoniously to a halt in the 
Caucasus yesterday as the hu¬ 
manitarian mission degenerated 
into a flying circus. 

As Vladimir Zhirinovsky, the 
ultra-nationalist leader, ranted 
against American imperialism and 
other pet hates, his bizarre peace 
mission was forced to wait in 
Armenia while the United Nations 
and Iran decided whether it could 


proceed to Baghdad. Mr 
Zhirinovsky, an outspoken sup¬ 
porter of Libya's Colonel Gaddafi, 
various Serbian war criminals ami 
assorted right-wing extremists 
across Europe, seemed to be 
en/oying the ill-feted mission to 
visit his old friend President 
Saddam Hussein. 

Although the hold of the giant 
Ilyushin 86 airliner is carrying 
more than seven tonnes of medi¬ 
cines for Iraqi children, the real 
purpose of the trip was indisput¬ 


ably seated in the first-class pas¬ 
senger cabin where the nationalist 
leader held forth to other traveHen; 
between puffs on Cuban cigars. 

“We are trying to bring medi¬ 
cines to Iraq and are being 
prevented. The Americans bring 
warships, rockets and fighters, but 
nobody stops them. Is Moscow 
going to help us or sit quietly like 
some American colony?*’ he shout¬ 
ed at regular intervals during the 
flight 

"The airstrikes planned for Iraq 
today are like Hina's bombing 
raids on Spain in the 1930s," hi 
thundered. “That was the first 


chapter of the Second World War. 
Our historic mission is to prevent 
the start of the Third World War. 1 * 

While Ins comments were not 
new. die politician did have the 
benefit of a captive audience of 
more than 100 journalists for 
nearly 24 hours, the best media 
exposure he has enjoyed since his 
faded presidential campaign two 
years ago. 

Other minor politicians were 
enjoying the spotlight as well, 
among them a Cossack ataman 
(leader), several communist back¬ 
benchers, a number of Russian 
Muslim dele g ates and a retired 


general who was involved in the 
failed uprising against President 
Yeltsin in 1993. 

However, even the most dedicat¬ 
ed reporters lost interest in the 
debate, particularly when Mr 
Zhirinovsky became hoarse. By 
journey’s end most of the politi¬ 
cians and the press had gravitated 
to the back of the plane to join an 
impromptu party fuelled by free 
vodka, brandy and beer. 

Some cynics on file flight sug¬ 
gested that Yerevan, the Armenian 
capital was chosen as a staging 
point to Baghdad because of its 
famous brandy, white Iran was 


ruled out because of its ban on 
alcohol. Whatever the reasons, Mr 
Zhirinovsky wasted little time 
switching his verbal onslaught 
from the Middle East to the 
Caucasus as soon as he landed in 
Yerevan early yesterday. Certainly 
his hosts woe delighted when he 
suggested that all Armenian Lands 
held by Turkey should be returned 
imm ediately. For good measure, 
he also railed against the leader of 
Armenia's old enemy. Azerbaijan. 

It is an open secret in Moscow 
that Yevgeni Primakov, the accom¬ 
plished Foreign Minister at the 

centre of efforts so fold a compro¬ 


Turkish forces enter 
Iraq to seal border 

From Andrew Finkelin Istanbul and Tom Rhodes in Washington 


mise to the showdown, does not 
want to see Mr Zhirinovsky's loud 
and highly undiplomatic mission 
ever reach Baghdad. Others sug¬ 
gest. unkindly , that Mr Zhirin¬ 
ovsky’s opponents want to delay 
his trip to ensure he win[be m 
Baghdad when it is bomb ed by 
American and British forces. 

In the meantime, the ljeace 

plane is being loaded up wifo fresh 

provisions and drinks for its next 
stage wherever that may be. 

□ Rome: President Yeltsin arrived 
here for talks with the Pope and 
the Italian Government in efforts 
to avert the bombing. 

FNRtCM RTUAP 


TURKEY launched thousands 
of troops across its border wiih 
Iraq os Washington yesterday 
announced it was sending up 
to 3.000extra ground troops to 
Kuwait. 

Although a Turkish military 
spokesman denied that any 
soldiers had entered Iraq, 
private television networks 
and newspapers published 
correspondents* first-hand ac¬ 
counts of the incursions. The 
Turkish media said their re¬ 
ports had been confirmed by 
villagers who act as mountain 
guides for the troops. 

Ankara has made dear its 
determination to prevent a 
repeat of what happened after 
the 19^1 Gulf War. when 
hundreds of thousands of 
Kurds sought refuge inside 
Turkey. 

WilUam Cohen, the US De¬ 
fence Secretary, signalled that 
diplomatic options in the Iraqi 
crisis were fading fast and that 
America and Britain would 
soon be forced to bomb Bagh¬ 
dad. He said in Kuwait that 
President Saddam Hussein's 
continuing intransigence over 
access for United Nations 
weapons inspectors would be 
to blame for a future conflict. 

"The window of opportunity 
fora diplomatic solution is not 
getting wider, it is getting 
narrower." he said. “If diplo¬ 
macy foils, Saddam Hussein 
in solely responsible for the 
consequences." 

Officials travelling with Mr 
Cohen said the US nad decid¬ 
ed to deploy ground troops in 
Kuwait to ensure the country's 
security and to discourage 
what they described as “cre¬ 
ative thinking" by Saddam. 

In Washington. Madeleine 
Albright, the Secretary of 
State, said that the US had the 
authority, responsibility, 
means and will to launch "not 
pinpricks but substantial 
strikes" against Iraq. 

Mr Cohen’s comments 
came after a night of lengthy 
negotiations in'Saudi Arabia 
during which America's big¬ 
gest and richest ally in the 
Gulf offered Mr Cohen tacit 
support for military action but 


MILITARY BUILD-UP 


not permission to use Prince 
Sultan airbase, near Riyadh, 
for sorties over Iraq. 

Mr Cohen had not asked 
that the United States be 
allowed to use what should 
have been its most strategic 
desert base, knowing that the 
Saudis would refuse. Both 
King Fahd and Prince Sultan, 
the Saudi Defence Minister, 
were concerned that an Ameri¬ 
can attack from Saudi Arabia 
could result in terrorist 
reprisals. 

Although a sustained bomb¬ 
ing campaign would be more 
effective with Saudi co-opera¬ 
tion, the Pentagon has adopt¬ 
ed an approach that could still 
involve the bombing of mili¬ 
tary installations in Iraq far 
Four consecutive days. 

The US. officials said, has 
enough bombers and fighters 
in neighbouring states, on 
aircraft carriers and at the 
British dependency' of Diego 


Garda in the Indian Ocean to 
carry out 200 sorties a day. 
The British have 19 Harrier 
jump jets on board HMS 
Invincible and eight Tornado 
bombers started arriving in 
Kuwait last night. 

But a sustained bombing 
campaign would be more 
effective with Saudi coopera¬ 
tion. It was unclear last night 
whether America would move 
SO attack jets from the Prince 
Sultan base to either Bahrain 
or Kuwait—Gulf states which 
have offered facilities for strike 
launches — or whether the 
Saudis had agreed that a 
further 50 aircraft could be 
deployed in a support 
capacity. 

Even Kuwait, the country 
whose invasion by Iraq 
sparked the Gulf War in 1991, 
was lukewarm in its response 
yesterday. Sheikh Salem Sa¬ 
bah al-Salem. the Defence 
Minister, said the aim of his 







it" • 




RAF ground crew prepare for the launch of a GR7 
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armed forces was solely to 
defend Kuwait “The aim and 
the target is not to go into Iraq 
land unless it is a matter of 
defending Kuwait" he said. 

Bulent Ecevit Turkey's 
Deputy Foreign Minister, yes¬ 
terday accused Britain and 
America of wanting to carve 
out a satellite Kurdish state in 
Iraq. One of the reasons 
behind the current crisis was 
the US desire to keep the price 
of oil high, he said in an 
interview with Milliyet 
newspaper. 

Mr Ecevitts concern, that 
Turkey is bring dragged into a 
conflict against its own best 
interests, signalled a weaken¬ 
ing in the support which 
Ankara has given to Washing¬ 
ton. It seems inevitable, how¬ 
ever, that file Turkish 
military, rather than the Cabi¬ 
net, will deride how far to back 
the military option. 

WhfieTurkey says it will not 
allow its Inrirlik airbase to be 
used for bombing runs, it has 
already given its consent for 
reconnaissance and air-rescue 
missions. 

Ankara's main objective is 
to see the lifting of economic 
sanctions against Iraq, which 
it says have cost more than 
£20 billion in lost business. 
Ismail Cem. the Turkish Ftar- 
eign Minister, was sent to 
Baghdad last week in an 
apparently fruitless attempt to 
persuade Saddam to comply 
with weapons inspection in 
return for an end to the trade 
embargo. 

□ New York: Kofi Annan, the 
UN Secretary-General, can¬ 
celled a Middle East tour to be 
ready to intervene in the crisis, 
possibly with a mission to 
Baghdad (James Bone writes). 
He is under pressure from 
Iraq's friends to visit Baghdad 
to ratify a compromise pro¬ 
posed by the Arab League in 
consultation with France and 
Russia. 

“The discussions and the 
search for a diplomatic sol¬ 
ution has readied a critical 
stage and my presence is 
needed here," Mr Annan said 
at his office here. 

Plan would 
allow entry 
to 70 sites 

From MktcaelTheodoolou 
IN NICOSIA 

DETAILS of a new plan to end 
the crisis were revealed yester- i 
day by the Arab League under | 
which arms experts would be 
allowed access to nearly 70 
sites for up to two months. 

Esmat Abdel-Meguid, the 
league's Secretary-General, 
who has been working with 
Iraq. France and Russia for a 
diplomatic solution, said that 
the proposals would be put to 
tbe United Nations Security 
Council as a draft resolution. 
This is a serious attempt by 
some permanent members of 
the council to solve the situa¬ 
tion peacefully." he said. In 


ARAB LEAGUE 


particular, eight presidential 
sites at the centre of the latest 
dispute would be open to 
inspection by a special team 
under a chainnan nominated 
by Kofi Annan, file Secretary- 
General of the UN. 

The com p romise plan foils 
short of American and British 
demands for full Iraqi compli¬ 
ance and it was undear 
whether President Saddam 
Hussein was seeking a face- 
saving formula or was playing 
for time. 

Eight British Tornado 
bombers were due to arrive in 
Kuwait, while four American 

warships passed through Suez 

on the way to file Gulf. 

The Gulf states have joined 
the US in wanting that 
Sa dda m wtwld.be responsible 
for "grave** consequences if he 
did not comply with UN 
resolutions. Yesterday, howev¬ 
er, Mr Abdel-Meguid said file 
use of force would be a 
“cata s trophe, not only for Iraq 
but fry foe whole region". 




Iraqi women student volunteers undergoing military training at a sports centre in Baghdad yesterday 


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6 14 OVERSEAS NEWS 


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THE TIMES TUESPAY FEBRUARY 101998 


Cigar ads 


KMRLUIONDONJJP 


under fire 


from US 


health 


watchdog 


From Tunku Varaoarajan in new yorx 


FEDERAL health officials, 
alarmed by spiralling sales 
and the fashion for cigar¬ 
smoking among women and 
the young, may soon require 
cigar advertisements to carry 
the US Surgeon-General's 
health warning, just as cigar* 
eric commercials do. 

The move, being considered 
by the Federal Trade Commis¬ 
sion (FTQ. is among mea¬ 
sures to bring the regulation of 
cigars into line with cigarettes. 

According to The Wall 
Street Journal, the FTC is 
particularly concerned about 
the use of “product placement” 
in films to glamorise cigar- 
smoking. A report by the 
American Lung Association 
found that, in a survey of 133 
films, at least 40 per cent 
featured the smoking of cele¬ 
bratory cigars or had scenes 
that “promoted cigars sub¬ 
liminal!}-". 

The decision to regulate the 
cigar industry more dosely 
comes in the wake of an 
astonishing boom. After a 
steady dedine over two de¬ 
cades. American sates of ci¬ 
gars have climbed 53 per cent 
since 1993. Much of this 
increased consumption has 
come not from “old fogeys 
with stogies" — who previous¬ 
ly constituted the dgar bed¬ 
rock — but from smokers 



Vanessa Williams; was 
criticised for smoking 


under 40. Most spectacular is 
the fashion for women to 
smoke dgars. 

The FTC has indicated that 
it may soon ask the industry to 
give the Government details of 
annual sales and advertising 
expenditure. This would give 
regulators a dearer picture of 
the nexus between film pro¬ 
ducers and cigar-makers. The 
National Cancer Institute is to 
publish a report on dgars next 
month that will address some 
popular beliefs, particularly 
the view that they are relative¬ 
ly safe and non-add ictive. 

According to the report, 
cigar-smokers are four to ten 
rimes more likely to die from 
cancer of the mouth, larynx 
and oesophagus than non- 
smokers. The study finds that 
because dgars are more 
alkaline than cigarettes, tar, 
nicotine and other chemical 
compounds can pass directly 
through the lining of die 
mouth and throat into the 
bloodstream. 

Cigar-smokers, however, 
are unlikely to respond to the 
report with a collective shiver 
of panic. The opulent lines of a 
Romeo y Juliets, or a Don 
Juan Utquijo. have largely 
replaced the attenuated ele¬ 
gance of cigarette-holders in 
die imagery of smoky 
glamour. 

The dgar is now big busi¬ 
ness and big style. No Ameri¬ 
can rity is without its stable of 
dgar bars, which are 
patronised as much by women 
as by men. Indeed, magazines 
such as Cigar Aficionado and 
Smote make a point of adorn¬ 
ing their covers with cigar- 
snioking models. Last year 
Smoke featured the actress 
EUe Macpherson on its cover 
with a fat Cuesta Key Maduro 
No 2 clenched between her 
teeth. She was criticised by 
doctors and family associa¬ 
tions in America and her 
native Australia for saying 
that “dgar-smoking has be¬ 
come such a fashionable thing 
now". 

More recently, the actress 
Vanessa Williams caught the 
nation's imagination by smok¬ 
ing a dgar at the premiere of 
her film Eraser. Inevitably, 
she drew fire for “setting a bad 
example to America's young”. 



Rescuers by to pull a horse from the 
surging Litdc Pine Creek in Califor¬ 
nia as swollen rivers and flash floods 
caused by a series of Pacific storms 
killed at least 18 people in the stale 
over the weekend. The animal which 
slipped about 1 00ft down a landslide 
into the river, was pulled free after 
two hours in the water (G3cs WhitteH 
writes). A state of emergency has 


California storms kill 18 


been declared m much of California. 
The seasonal storms, str en gt h ened 
by the El Nino effect pounded the 
coast with heavy surf drenched 
inland areas and damped up to 9 ft 
of snow on the Sierra Nevada 
mountains. Northern California has 


already received force times its usual 
February rainfall. A teenager was 
swept to his death from a beach near 
Santa Cruz and an S4-yearM»ld for¬ 
mer stoot man died when his car fell 
into a ravine in Los Angeles, but foe 
worst casualties were sooth of the 


bonier in Mexico. Flash floods 
roared through shanty towns hr foe 
sprawling border city of Tijubna. 
killing 14. including two sisters who' 
drowned in a staQedcar while foefr 
father searched for help. Sht homes ' 
in Rio Nido, north of San Francisco, 
slid down a rain-weakened hillside. 
Another storm is expected to. hit the 
northern half of the state tomorrow. 


President’s pursuers 



From Bronwen Maddox in Washington 


KENNETH STARR. the inde¬ 
pendent prosecutor, could 
pass the investigation of sex 
and perjury allegations 
against President Clinton to 
Congress if he fails to mount a 
legally watertight case. Re¬ 
publicans are speculating. 

As unequivocal evidence of 
a sexual rdatiomhip between 
foe President and Monica 
Lewinsky, a former trainee, 
continues to etude Mr Starr, 
leading figures in foe Republi¬ 
can-controlled Congress con¬ 
sidered whether they would be 
asked to pick up foe baton. 

That move could prolong 
the investigation throughout 
much of the remainder of Mr 
Clinton’s time in office, while 
adding to its partisan vitriol, a 
prospect dreaded by the White 


House. But Republicans also 
fear the political backlash if 
they were seen to be pursuing 
a partisan witch-hunt against 
a highly popular President. 

Trent Lott, the Senate ma¬ 


jority leader, yesterday urged 
Republicans to be cautious in 
talking of impeachment 
because “it is too early to judge 
the situation". Referring to 
opinion polls showing strong 
support for foe President he 
added: “I think they're sitting 
on a precipice and they could 
teeter over it” 

The .latest Wall Street 
Jaumal/NBC opinion poll 
found that 79 per cenr approve 
of how Mr Clinton is doing his 
job. Just 22 per cent thought 
Mr Starr was conducting an 
impartial investigation; 57 per 
cent said that the case should 
be dropped. 

Another attempted deal 
under which Ms Lewinsky 
would co-operate with Mi 
Starr in return for immunity 
from prosecution collapsed ac¬ 
rimoniously. Mr Starr's fail¬ 
ure to agree terms for getting 
Ms Lewinsky’s testimony has 
been his greatest stumbling 
block in proving that the 


President lied on oath about a 
sexual relationship and urged 
Ms Lewinsky to cover it up. 

Mr Starr’s office said that it 
wanted her to give them a 
face-to-face interview, and 
possibly also take a lie-detec¬ 
tor test before granting her 
immunity. They are believed 
to be conoerned about her 
credibility as a kvftness. But 
William Ginsburg, Ms Lewin¬ 
sky's lawyer, said she would 
give those interviews only 
after being granted immunity. 

However, under foe Consti¬ 
tution. he could hand on foe 
investigation to congressional 
committees, even with an in¬ 
completely established case, 
the option now beginning to 
exercise Capitol HilL Under 
the Independent Counsel Act 
foe prosecutor is required to 
report to the House of Repre¬ 
sentatives any “substantial 
and credible” evidence that the 
President may have commit¬ 
ted an impeachable offence. 



Whoopi Goldberg welcomes the Clintons to a 
show she hosted.ata' Washington theatre. 


Middle 


America 


puts gays 
beyond 
the pale 


By Tunku Varawrawn 


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TH E American middle classes 
are tolerant of virtually every¬ 
thing except homosexuality, 
a new book w be 
__ ednexr month. 

The book. One Nation. 
Alter AU by Alan Wolfe, a 
professor at Boston Uniwersuy 
and America's preeminent 
sociologist, is foe most de¬ 
tailed picture of foe American 
suburban classes to be pub¬ 
lished in decades. 

Profesisor Wolfe writes that 
middle-class Americans are 
reluctant to pass judgment on 
others and are “tolerant to a 
fault” of all races, religions, 
lifestyles and practices, “with 
the conspicuous exception of 
homoswtuality"; When it 
comes to assessing gay men 
and lesbians, the book says, 
the middle-class Everyman 
..discards his acceptance of an 
“accommodating, pluralistic 
society": 

This apparent contradic¬ 
tion, detected by professor 
Wolfe after interviews with 
200 people in the suburbs of 
Tulsa, Atlanta, San Diego and 
' Boston. Is explained ty the fact 
that suburban Americans are 
neither doctrinaire nor dog¬ 
matic The book says: “Mid- 
.dledass morality is wfaai it is 
because it has no politics. It is 
an outlook ori the world that 
grows up from personal expe¬ 
rience, not down from ideo¬ 
logical commitment” ; - 

the author advances foe 
-thesis that middle-dass Amer¬ 
icans ace divided within 
themselves: “Most people 
-want to be traditional and 
modem at the same time.” 

. • But haw do middled ass 
Americans reconcile their be- 
lief in freedom with, their 
dondannation of homosexual¬ 
ity? Professor Wolfe suggests 
that, tile distinction may wdl 
be made at an instinctive level. 
They have perhaps concluded 
that, if foe distinctionbetween 
right and-Wrohg' is to be 
applied anywhere, it should be 
applied hrie. • 

Americans , believe foal 
homosexuality is a choice — 
unlike bong black. Mexican . 
or a woman- Professor Wolfe 
cites-a number of words that 
were used by his interviewees 
to characterise homosexuality: 
abnormal immoral. unac¬ 
ceptable, unhealfoy and 
wrong. \Hewrites:"Bofo foe 
.size of the group willing to 
condemn homosexuality, and 
the veherDeDce.-.with .which 
tftey did so, indicated that here 
is indeed the ultimate test of 
American tolerance: foe line . 
separating gay America from . 
straight America, is.a fine that 
an unusually large number of 
middle-class Americans are 
unwfling to cross." 

□ One Nation, After All by 
Alan Wolfe, Viking, New ■ 
York, $24.95 



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THE TIMES TUESDAY FEBRUARY 101998 


rk FEATURES 15 


Was Diana pregnant? 

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Death of a 



;. In the firstrof three pages 
their new, book, 
and Seoit MacLeod reveal 
* test files from 

./ijiana^s medical dossier }£*■ 



O n Saturday, Sep¬ 
tember 6. 1997, in 
Britain's largest 
public funeral since 
the death of Winston Chur¬ 
chill. the flag-draped coffin of 
Diana. Princess of Wales, was 
drawn on a gun carriage 
through Central London by six 
horses, accompanied by 12 
red-jacketed Welsh Guards 
and followed on foot by her 
sons William and Harry. 
Prince Charles, Prince Philip 
and her brother Earl Spencer. 
After the service in Westmin¬ 
ster Abbey, the Princess was 
laid to rest on a peaceful island 
amid a lake at her ancestral 
home in Ahhorp. some 70 
miles northwest of London. 

The tranquillity of her final 
resting place contrasted with 
the tempest of rumours, myths 
and interrogations that 
swirled up following her 
death. Word began to spread 
that she had been _____ 
pregnant at die 
time of her death. 

Under normal 
circumstances, 
that would have 
been a.purely pri¬ 
vate matter — an 
additional cause 
lor sadness if 
true, pointless 
and idle gossip if 
not But the 
Princess’s violent 
death was not a 
normal^ event/> ' 

And the question 
of whether or not she was 
pregnant is one of the most 
explosive elements in die in¬ 
vestigation, because a preg¬ 
nancy would give greater 
credence to the assassination 
plot theories that began in the 
Middle East and soot prolifer¬ 
ated around the globe. 

For the mother of the future 
King of England to bear the 
child of an Arab and a 
Muslim, a child who would be 
the half-sibling of the heir to 
the throne, would be embar¬ 
rassing and problematic in the 
eyes of the Royal Family and 
the ruling Establishment If a 
pregnancy were confirmed, 
the conspiracy theories would 
be unattainable. There could 
theoretically be consequences 
for Britain's relations with the 
Arab world and resentment 
among the 15 million Muslim 
population living in Britain. 

Most of die "proof” of the 
prioress’s alleged pregnancy 
is circumstantial. Some photos 
of her In St Tropez do show a 
little roll in the stomach, but it 
could just as easily be the 
normal midriff of a 36-year- 
■ old woman in a bathing suit 
For a pregnancy to be visible, 
the foetus would have to be at 
least three or four months old. 
The Princess and Dodi got 
together only in mid-July, 
making it unlikely that any 
conception oould have taken 
place longer than six weeks 
earlier (unless the father were 
someone other than Dodv). 
Stories that the couple had 
started dating as early as 1 «J% 
are untrue, according to. 
sources dose to both of them. 

It is al so pointed out that on 
August 30 Diana told her 
friend, the journalist Richard 
Kay, that she was reducing 
her official duties and clearing 
her calendar from November. 
That could add credibility to 
the pregnancy theory. Then 
there was her.,, provocative 
statement to the British jour¬ 
nalists in St Tropez: "You will 

have a big surprise coming 

sixhi, the next thing I do. 
Some have suggested thatthe 
“surprise” could have been 
wedding plans — perhaps 
accompanied by a pregnancy. 
But die Princess's impromptu 
remark was made before Dodi 
even showed up in St Tropez. 

Concrete evidence is more 
difficult to come by- There was 
a document purportedly a 
confidential letter from 3 
French doctor to Intenor Min¬ 
ister Jean-Pierre Oievcne- 
ment, stating that Diana was 
nine to ten weeks pregnant, a 
photocopy of this l et | er _5“ X j^ 
lated among several Ftencn 


publications. But the docu¬ 
ment, of dubious authenticity, 
was denounced as a fake by 
the Interior Ministry and the 
hospital. Consequently, no 
French news outlet ever pub¬ 
lished it. 

But there were allusions to a 
possible pregnancy in the 
mainstream press. Time mag¬ 
azine; in its edition of Septem¬ 
ber 22, 1997. stated mat a 
doctor claimed to have been 
told by a colleague, who 
treated the Princess in the 
tunnel, that she had made a 
rubbing gesture on her belly 
and informed him that she 
was “six weeks pregnant". 
Though the magazine had 
carefully couched this second¬ 
hand anecdote in a paragraph 
on “lies, conspiracy theories 
and outrageous tales” die 
passage was taken out of 
context and widely misquoted 
as “proof* that Diana was 


A physician claims 
that the Princess’s 
test results were 
removed from 
her medical file 


pregnant. In fact. Time had 
merely relayed what a report¬ 
er was told by the doctor; there 
was no way of knowing if he, 
or his anonymous colleague, 
was accurately quoting the 
Princess* words. Given the 
conflicting accounts about 
whether she spoke at all after 
tile accident, this story does 
not seem entirely convincing. 


u 


’ nder the beading of 
second-hand ac¬ 
counts, a respected 
French journalist 
related the following story to 
the authors: a physician he 
knows personally, who works 
at Pitifr-Salpfitriere,- told him 
that blood tests taken on the 
Princess’s arrival showed that 
she was indeed pregnant 
This physician, who identi¬ 
fied his source as a member of 
the medical team that operat¬ 
ed on the ’Princess, added that 
when he looked in her medical 
dossier several days after her 
death, all the test results had 
been removed. His medical 
source refused to be inter¬ 
viewed for this book. Thus 
there is no way of verifying 
this. 

But it is possible to examine 
the extent to which it nay be 
considered plausible. It is nec¬ 
essary to know whether doc¬ 
tors would have drawn blood 
and tested for pregnancy while 
fighting desperately for a trau¬ 


ma victim’s life. The answer is, 
yes: they would hare taken 
blood samples id identify the 
blood type (for transfusion 
purposes) and measure the 
degree of haemorrhaging with 
a rest that counts the different 
kinds of blood cells. In most 
cases, other tests would nor¬ 
mally be done, for example, to 
evaluate the coagulability of 
the blood, measure the level of 
electrolytes in the blood serum 
and. for women of childbear¬ 
ing age, a Beta-HCG test for 
pregnancy. 

In the US. according to Dr 
David Wasserman. an experi¬ 
enced American emergency 
room physician, the Beta- 
HCG would be fairly stan¬ 
dard. The doctors would 
want to know if a patient was 
pregnant or not." says 
Wasserman. “It wouldn't stop 
them from giving her life¬ 
saving treatment, out it would 
' stop them from 
doing elective 
procedures that 
might harm the 
fberus." 

According to a 
prominent 
French specialist 
in emergency 
medicine, obliged 
to speak anony¬ 
mously because 
of the medical se¬ 
crecy required by 
French law. it 
' • would be "rea- 

" sonable and ra¬ 
tional”, though not obligatory, 
for French emergency physi¬ 
cians to do the Beta-HCG. He 
stresses, though, that for “an 
emergency doctor with a medi¬ 
cal catastrophe on his hands, 
his primary concern would not 
be knowing if the woman was 
pregnant or not”. 

He notes, however, that 
another standard, obligatory 
measure could reveal the pres¬ 
ence of a foetus. In addition to 
a brain scan and an X-ray of 
the thoracic region, he says, 
the emergency room doctors 
would hare done a sonogram. 
This technique, which exam¬ 
ines internal organs via the 
reflection of ultrasonic waves, 
would be performed primarily 
to identify lesions and check 
the accumulation of blood in 
bodily cavities. But a 
sonogram will also produce 
the recognisable image of a 
foetus, with the head and 
folded-up body clearly visible 
even to the layman, (though a 
foetus younger than three 
weeks could be detected only 
by a specialist) 

This specialist cautions that, 
under emergency medical con¬ 
ditions. a doctor would not 
necessarily see a foetus on the 
sonogram screen unless he 
was looking for one. which 
could be obscured by massive 
haemorrhaging. At six weeks, 
however, toe foetus would 
probably be visible. It is 



The picture of the Princess in St Tropez that fuelled the pregnancy and conspiracy theories 


An earring, 
shoes and 
a bracelet 

ONE OF the first tasks following the 
crash was tu collect (he objects left in the 
car by the occupants. The inventory of 
these artefacts — plucked hy anonymous 
hands from the intimacy of pockets and 
bodies and thrown into a plastic pouch — 
tells a poignant story. 

DUN VS effects: 

A Jaeger-Lecuuitier gold watch with 
white stones 

\ bracelet with six rows of while pearls 
and a clasp in (lie form of a dragon 
A gold ring with white stones 
One gold earring (on October 22. 
investigators found the other earring under 
toe dashboard of the wrecked car) 

A pair or bl nek Versace high-heeled 
shoes 

A black Ralph Lauren woman's hell 
DODFS effects: 

Fr 1.000 in the form of five Fr 200 notes 
A rectangular Cartier watch with a 
maroon-coloured crocodile watch hand 
A Breitling chronoerafl watch, in 
working condition, with no watch band 
A white metal watchband with a 
Breitling trademark 
A Citizen watch, non-wnrking. with the 
hour frozen at 12.00 
A fawn-coloured leather cigar-holder 
containing one cigar with no hand 
A flat metal dog tag with metal chain, 
inscribed ~D. Fayed, ty pe B pos.“ 

An Asprey gold cigar-clipper 

HENRI PAUL'S effects: 

Fr 12.5MJ in cash 
A driver's licence 
A magnetic Rio. Hotel ID badge 
A Justice Ministry' ID badge 
A Visa credit card 
An American Express card 
A saving account passbook 
A Diner’s Club card 
A Casio digital calculator 
Two sets of keys 

TREVOR REES-JONES'S effects: 

A Hodgkinson Telecom beeper 
A black leather address book 
A Visa card receipt in the name of 
Trevor Rees-Jones 
A blue Bic lighter 
A set of six keys on a Canal-Plus 
keyring 

Contrary to widespread press reports, the 
diamond ring Dodi had bought for Diana 
was not found in the car it was back in 
his apartment, where he almost certainly 
intended to slip it on the Princess's finger 
later. Also not found in the car. despite 
persistent rumours, was cocaine or any 
other drug A mystery surrounds the 
£250.000 Bulgari rubv necklace that 
Mohamed AJ Fayed's entourage insists was 
worn by the Princess that night and 
“stolen” from her body. 

French police say the jewellery was 
not found in the car and doubt that any 
such necklace could have been snatched 
from her at the scene, given the number of 
witnesses who were there from the first 
moments after toe accident. The police 
version is supported by photographs of 
the Princess emerging from the Rilz to get 
into the Mercedes, which dearly show 
her to he hare-necked. 


possible, says this specialist, 
that photos were made from 
toe sonogram screen that 
might show a foetus. If a 
permanent image was made, 
it would be included in the 
medical dossier, along with all 
the blood test results. 

Thus, if the Princess was 
pregnant, there is a very 
strong chance that the evi¬ 
dence would be in her medical 
dossier at the hospital. As for 
the whereabouts of the medi¬ 
cal file, this specialist, who is 
not connected with Pitie- 
Salpetriere and claims no first¬ 
hand knowledge, speculates 
that “It is probably locked up 
in a safe. I can't see it being 
archived like an ordinary file.” 

In addition to hospital offici¬ 
als, it is likely toar the police 
also have a copy of the 
Princess’s file. In cases of 

BIG PICTURES 



Why did the Princess tell journalists “tbe next thing I do will be a big surprise”? 


violent or suspicious deaths, 
where an official investigation 
is opened, copies of the vic¬ 
tim's medical records are usu¬ 
ally requisitioned by the 
Prefecture of Police, under the 
ultimate authority of Interior 
Minister Jean-Pierre Cheven- 
emerrt. Thus any eudence 
suggesting that tire Princess 
was pregnant would be in the 
hands of the police. 

According to sources with 
access to the official iroesngj- 
tion dossier, none of the 
Princess's medical records is 
included. There is only a 
succinct report on the patholo¬ 
gist's external corporal exami¬ 
nation. The French patho¬ 
logist. Dr Dominique 
Lecomte, did not perform a 
port mortem examination on 
the Princess and. according to 
what a police report describes 
as “instructions received", 
drew no blood sample from 
the body. In Britain, a post 
mortem on die Princess's body 
was carried out for the Ful¬ 
ham Coroners office, which 
would certainly have discov¬ 
ered the presence of a foetus. 
When questioned about preg¬ 
nancy reports, a coroner's 
office spokesman replied: “No 
comment. That’s part of the 
investigation.” 

full-scale public in¬ 
quest by the Royal 
Coroner. Dr John 
.Burton, will be held 
on completion of the French 
investigation. Bur Burton has 
the righi to take any part of rhe 
proceedings in camera. It 
seems highly unlikely, there¬ 
fore, that he would reveal any 
information confirming a 
pregnancy. 

TTse information available 
leaves open the possibility that 
the Princess may have been 
pregnant. In the future, the 
release of documents or testi¬ 
mony now withheld may an¬ 
swer this key question. But one 
thing is certain: the evidence 
does exist to prove or disprove 
a pregnancy. 



PAGES 16 AND 17: MOHA MED AL FAYED SPEAKS OF HIS LOSS; NEED DIANA HAVE DIED? 


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I’m not going 
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n 


M ohamed Al Fayed eo 
bounds suddenly in- w 
to the boardroom at m 
Harrods. The Egyp- F( 
tian tycoon is dapper in his white- sc 
collared shirt and plaid trousers, bi 
Even before introductions can be is 
made, he thrusts Harrods teddy re 
bears into the arms of his unsus- n 
peering guests and says “Merry p 

Christmas!" ? 

The festive mood inside the vast n 
department store, which is lavishly 
decorated in the theme of r 

Tchaikovsky’s Nutcracker, cannot t 

conceal the profound pain he feels / 

as he sits down to discuss the a 

tragedy in Paris for - 

the first time public- 
ly. Although the 40- 
day Muslim period , 

of mourning is over, ■. . J 

he continues to m l ’m 
grieve for Dodi and MW ■ 
Diana, Princess of 
Wales: the tie adorn- g 
ing his Turnbull and 
Asser shirt is blade. 

It is clear that he 

feels as if he has lost (JUI 

not onlv a son. but 

two children, and at oriVtllT 

a moment when 

such happiness for Q t 

them was in the U3 31 

offing. He notes that 

he has received con- IOITiJ 

dolence messages .. 

from the Queem fami 

prince Edward. Dr 

George Carey, the Thirij 

Archbishop of Can- 111X1 « 

terbury, and Tony — 

Blair. He was. Al 
Fayed says, as surprised as any¬ 
body when Dodi and the Princes 
fell in love. But he can see the 
attraction. “She had been excited to 
marry the future King when she 
was "young." Al Fayed explains. 
“But she had no experience of lite. 
She faced this maze of tradition and 
bureaucracy and found that this 
was not the life she was looking for. 
After her father passed on. she 
would sometimes come to me tor 
advice. She wanted to live like an 
ordinary person. She came from 
the aristocracy, but she is an 
ordinary girl." , , 

Al Fayed believes that the 
Princess's St Tropez holiday with 
liim, his wife and his five children 
opened her eyes to the possibilities 
of a happy family life. 

“Our family, she never saw 
anything like it in her life, he says, 
noting that she had had an 


enjoyed freedom, no formaUties. 
With a laugh, he adds: “Dodi has 
the same sense of humour as m^ 
For the first time, she meets 
somebody like me, only 
She enjoyed our family, and Dodi 
is part of it. Things worked out 
naturally. If my son is happy. I am 
happy. It was his choice, tos 
problem. I want to make htm 
completely independent, not rely- 
ina on me all the nme. 

The lightheartedness m ins man¬ 
ner fades as soon as Al Fayal 
beings to speak of the crash in the 
Alma tunnel. While he is keepm* 
an open mind until the French 


Death of a 

Princess 

‘Our family, she never saw 

anything like it in her life. With 

us she enjoyed freedom, no 

formalities. She enjoyed our 

family and Dodi is part of it. 
Things worked out naturally’ 

rised as any- investigation is completed, he is masses, fc 

'S’JJS ri^^h^ap^^will fon^AH 

f mditinn and his bitter battle with the Establish- says. Mi 
[£d that this ment somehow played a part in the JOug® 
as looking for. tragedy. . to i 


- w y- 0 u cam believe what I 
\/ am fighting here,” he 
V says with a wince that 
A wrinkles his brow. 
“They can’t get over the fact that I 
own Harrods. It's an Egyptian, not 
a Briton, who built this store, this 
fantasy. How can a bloody Egyp¬ 
tian come from another planet and 

do this?" , . 

This brings Al Fayed to the 
"sleaze” scandal, and he makes no 
apologies for his role in bringing 

i _t-_ nm anl that nan 


and the Prince,, -She haU no experience o, life. After her father passed 


on. she would sometimes come to me for advice" ents- biner divorce. -Wtth as. she 


.■ U thn. chP had had an apologies lor ms rote m 


what he gave to the_ 
denied him citizenship. 1 brou-m 
down part of them." he explains, 
tefippuddenly trembling. tears 

until I bring down 
the rest of them. 1 wont stop until 
reveal the true extent of the pohtwal 
conspiracy that I haw been the 
Sn of. how they set up 
government inquiry to P !ea f e r T> 
business rival Tiny Rowland, * ho 

lost out when he sold me the sh ares 
so that I could acquire Harrods. 

“They did it to hurt me. even 
though two Trade Ministers said 
there was no need for such an 
inquiry, it did nun 
■ - me. but they will 

. never get me down.” 

He “gets up and 
walks across the 
room to get a box of 
y—^ tissues from a small 

L 1 WJ table in the comer. 

^ “l am a taxpayer 
Kta*/ k-/ in this country.” he 

continues. "1 haw 
devoted 30 years of 
nnu; my life, employing 

adW people, bringing in 

t's business, paying 

3. WltlX hundreds, of mil¬ 

lions of pounds in 

n T10 tax®- TWs is my 

’ country. You don't 

d nni" want to end after 

141 you sacrifice for all 

a. £ if this, to be humiliat- 

L OI 11. ed in a report com- 

ii , missioned by a 

Lirally corrupt Tory Gov¬ 

ernment I am fight- 
— 1 1,1 jng a crusade for the 

s masses, for the ordinary people." 
h It was precisely these influential 
U forces, Al Fayed believes, who were 
y appalled by the news that the 
Princess had fallen in love with his 
s son, Dodi. 

L t" “It was a very serious matter, ne 

i- says. “Maybe the future King is 
ie going to have a half-brother who is 
a ‘nigger’, Mohamed Al Fayed is 
going to be the stepgnmdfather of 
I the future King. This is how they 
w think, this Establishment. They are 
at a completely different type ot 
v. human being.” , r 

i I The meeting has been a difficult 
ot one for the Harrods chief. By the 
iis end, the tension in his body has 
p- become palpable, his quest for 
!d answers to his tragedy intense. But 
before excusing himself to attend 
he another appointment, he makes a 
no vow: "I am not going to rest until 1 
ng know what happened. It is not only 
ad my son. It is the mother of the two 
ite boys." 



Asthmatics move into class of their own 




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7.00*. ! 


I f Pissy. me anii-her.'' in 
Loni'Of The Flies, bad 
been a’fracti'jn older — 
«.vcr 12 - and had had the 
advantage nf the new anri- 
asihmaiic inhaler, the Oxis 
Turhohaler. he mishi never 
have bc.-n murdered. 

If he had been even youn- 
2 er. he wmild have benefiied 
from me miter new anii- 
a-.thma preparation. Singu- 
j lair, introduced this week. 

1 which i- suitable for ever>- 
1 bhxh from d\ onwards, 
j plysv. lacking adequate 
I treatment, suffered from re- 
| current asthma: he wheezed, 
i couuhed. grunted, and kept 
j the Others aw oke at night with 
| his laboured breathing. By 
i djv hi> thick spectacles in- 
! creased his vulneniWiiiy. As 
; rhe mob became more vicious, 
j he was the obvious' iciim 
! Now thai asthma is beenm- 
: more ciimmon. there is 

! greater understanding i'f the 

i disease, ssnd of the extreme 
I discomfort, even terror, that 
the irahilirv to breathe causes. 

1 A%thma has increased b\ 

! more than 5U |X.*r cent in the 
i YVoiem world in the past 25 
; vears. In some parts _nf 
j Europe, the figures are partic- 
; ularh had. In \Y:des ‘he 
j numbers have doubled, and 
R sW 5.4 lit ill ini] people in rhe 
i ■ I K suffer from it. 


in New Zealand, the situa¬ 
tion is even worse, one in three 
having asthma. In the devel- 
opins world, however, asthma 
is -rill relatively rare, and it is 
not often seen, tor instance, 
anu ms the Australian Aborigi¬ 
nes or the Inuils. 

The reason for the increase 
is uncertain. Central heating is 
frequently Warned as it causes 
an increase in a number of 
house dust miles, which, to¬ 
gether with pollen. dusL and 
fur from cats and other house¬ 
hold pets, as well as moulds 
and Fungi, can flourish in a 
warm, moist climate. 

The extraordinary preva¬ 
lence of asthma in Australia 
ami New Zealand reflects the 
•jeneral liability of the popula¬ 
tion to suffer from allergies for 
which air pollution has been 
blamed. 

In Britain the deathrate 
from asthma is falling- The 
me>saae rhat the best treat¬ 
ment for asthma is to keep it at 
bay by the correct use ot 
inhaled corrico-steroids or oth¬ 
er ami-inflammatury drugs, 
together with broncho dilators 
during an acute attack, is 
being reflected in better 
statistics. 

Doctors are now more able 
to assess the severity or an 
attack. They have overcome 
their fear of prescribing sys- 


MEDICINE 

~ 1 7 w ■ > t .'i' ■ • U.-V-. 

CHEST 

DR THOMAS STUTTAFORD 


temic steroids and now have 
well established rules as to 
when a patient needs admis¬ 
sion to hospital. 

Asthma is caused by the 
narrowing of the bronchial 
tubes leading to the lungs, so 
that the patient is starved of 
air. Much of this narrowing is 
foe result of oonstriction 
caused by tightening of the 
muscles of the airways. In¬ 
flammation of the tubes not 
only causes muscle construc¬ 
tion. but also the swelling of 
airways which then produce 
more sticky mucous, which 
further impedes air flow. In¬ 
flammation is present even in 
cases of mild disease. 


It is claimed that when 
Astra’s new Oxis Turbohaler, 
which contains eformoterol, a 
selective Beta-2 agonist which 
acts as a broncho dilator, is 
taken as well as inhaled 
steroids, it cuts the number of 
asthma attacks by one third. It 
should not be takfin by itself, 
and is not indicated for imme¬ 
diate relief but for long-term 
treatment. 

S ingulair Montelukast 
Sodium is the first of a 
new class of asthma 
treatment: til ere has been no 
similar innovation for more 
than 2D years. It is manufac¬ 
tured by Merck Sharp & 
Dohme. 

Many different mechanisms 
induce inflammation and 
hence broncho constriction in 
asthmatics. One group of 
chemicals, cysteinyi leuko- 
trienes, are potent causes of 
inflammation and as well as 
broncho constriction, produce 
hypersecretion of mucous and 


swelling in the airways. The. 
leukotrienes only make the 
airways hyper-responsive in 
asthmatic patients..'pie new 
drugs block their activity and 
thereby prevent the inflamma¬ 
tion which causes the airway 
obstruction — the asthma 
attack. 

Singulair, like Oxis, is an 
add-on preparation. Singulair 
is used in conjunction with 
existing prophylactic anti- 
asthma products. It is taken in 
tablet Form and results in 
fewer, milder attacks of asth¬ 
ma, better lung function and 
improved exerase tolerance. 

It should never be used as | 
an emergency treatment. Its 
role is lo help to stop the 
patient having attacks. Its 
side-effects are mild, but the 
very occasional patient has 
complained of upset tummies, 
dizziness, headaches, nasal 
congestion and rashes — the 
type of symptoms that tend to 
occur whatever the treatment 
prescribed. 


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THE TIMES TUESDAY FEBRUARY 10 1998 


FEATURES 17 


i 5 - 

— w% 

31 


missing minutes 




:• v«ssir 


The doctors battled to save 
her life, but would Diana, 
Princess of Wales, have 
lived if she had reached 
the hospital earlier? 


T he first doctor on the 
scene was Frfdferic 
Mailliez,.36. a physi¬ 
cian whh the private 
medical service SOS 
M6dedns. Mailliez and his' 
companion Mark Butt, 42, a 
native of Baltimore, were {hiv¬ 
ing home from a birthday 
party and tattered the Alma 
tunnel via the east bound lane 
within a minute of die acci¬ 
dent *T was pretty sure that 
the car had just crashed 
because the smoke was stQl in 
the tunnel and the horn was 
still • going,” Mailliez said. 
“People were just - walking 
towards the car.- I stow the 
severely damaged car and 1 
sav# four people inside. TV/b 
were apparently dead and two 
severely injured." 

MaiQiez went back to his 
cat, a white Ford fiesta bar¬ 
ing a prominent blue SOS 
M6dedns logo, and placed a 
magnetic beacon light on its 
roof On his cellphone, he 
called the firemen’s emergen¬ 
cy urfrt There is a- severe car 
crash; here at the Font de 
I’Alma," he told the dispatch¬ 
er. There are two people 
severely injured. I need two 
ambulances." Mailliez also re¬ 
quested a specially equipped ‘ 
vehicle, a sort of mobile can- 
opmer, to cut through metal 
and free crapped accident vie- - 
tires. He then returned to the 
Mercedes. A volunteer -fire¬ 
man was attending Trevor 
ReefrJones in the front seat, so 
Mailliez turned to the blonde 


followed by cardiac arrest". 
The doctors discovered that 
' her chest cavity was filled with 
blood from a tear in her left 
pulmonary vein, the vessel 
that carries oxygenated Wood 
from the left lung into the 
atrium chamber of the heart 
Backed-up Wood had pooled 
in the lungs, making h impos¬ 
sible for the Princess to 
breathe without the support of 
tiie heart-lung machine that 
she had been hooked up to' 
upon entering surgery. Blood 
loss had starved her internal 
organs of oxygen .and. dam¬ 
aged the heart muscle. 

While one surgeon sutured 
the lesion, other doctors took' 
turns squeezing the Princess's 
heart in their bands in an 
attempt to restore a heartbeat 
Drugs and electric shocks 
were also administered. After 
nearly two hours of fruitless 
efforts, the doctors turned off 
fhe heart-lung machine and 
sewed up the cavity. The 
Princess was declared dead at 
4.00 on Sunday mommg. 

According to a French offi¬ 
cial at the hospital, several 
members of .the operating 
team told him that the Prin¬ 
cess may have died before 
reaching the operating room. 
Tlfey noted that, after foe first 
half-hour under foe turind, 
she had stopped moving and 
slipped into a deep coma. 
“What's troubling,’* says this 
official, "is that it took more 
than an hour from the time of 
foe accident to tire time foe 



The Princess’s coffin arrives at RAF Northolt the doctors who treated the Princess were said to have worked "far beyond the bounds of duty" in their efforts to save her 


woman {whose identity he did ' ambulance left foe tunnel, and 
not |leam until be saw it on- -then it rolled very slowly." 
CNR the next morning). '. • Had the patient not been the 

Hb found Diana. Princess of : Princess of Wales, tiusoffidal 
WaAs. slumped - orb foe floor!, confides, doctors might have 
wimhertefr'Iegupontherear palled- foe plug and pro- 
seatland her ngirt leg folded'- ndunced her dead long before 
under' her. She TvasTehnuig' 5 " they cficL' Instead; H foey' did 


says one thoracic surgeon on surgeons. “A ruptured pubno- 
the staff of a public hospital in nary vein is a rare, rare 
Paris. Tt*s the vessel that feeds injury." says Ochsner. “The 
oxygenated blood bade into much more common decelera- 
the heart. It is a large vein, tioninjuiy is to the aorta. Once 
with a heavy blood flaw, that ruptures — paw! Death is 
which can be ripped in the instantaneous." 
case of a major shock, or That is not necessarily foe 
deceleration. This produces a case with the pulmonary vein, 
pulling on the vein, which can says Ochsner. “Because the 
cause ft to snap and rip off." pulmonary vein is a low- 
The condition is rarely drag- pressure system, the bleeding 
nosed, however. The reason, is less rapid and can kind of 
says this specialist, who insists clot and form a pseudo-do- 
on anonymity, is that people sure. The pressure gang in 
with such injuries usually die there is almost a negative 
■before they can be treated. But pressure, because of the inspi- 


’ under her. She was letom'g’ ' 
agaiist the bade of Rees- 
Jones’s sfeat with her back 
towards foe door and her chin 
tucked against her chest. Site 
was in a‘position that made it 
difficult - to breathe, says 
Maflfiez-so hecarefully raised 
her head and put an oxygen 
mask cwr her face. In an 
interview!'' in ' Impact 
Quotufren, a daily journal for 
physicians, he described his 
actions 4 in these - '. 

professional 
tarns: "I helped 
her tb breathe 
with a made and! - 

attempted to Tib- Thg 1 

erate foe upper u . 

respiratory pas- ^ 

arsons h01 

slightly. 1 sought " 

to unblock the tra¬ 
chea and prevent the tongue 
from bloating the oro-phar- 
ynx. She seemed to be a bit 
more agitated, but more reac¬ 
tive, dure' she was able to 
breathe better." 

Mailliez said that the 
woman seemed to be in the 
best shape of anyone ip the 
car though it was not appar- 
era to him at the time that she 
suf ered from serious internal 
haemorrhaging- 

- A t the beginning. 

from foe outride. 

J 1 she looked pretty 
Jt Jkwfine. But the inter¬ 
nal! injury, as you know, was 
already starting.I thought 
thi woman had a chance." 
Soi leone said foe car’s occu- 
pai ts spoke English, so 
Mzilliez asked her a few 
-questions and, as he put it. 
“d-jed to make her feel more 
comfortable". 

The SAMU ambulance 
bearing the Princess left the 
tuqngl at about lJZSam escort¬ 
ed ty two policemen on metor- 
eyejes with sirens blaring. On. 
the doctors' instructions, how¬ 
ever, the ambulance proceed¬ 
ed itowly to avoid bumps and . 
accelerations foal fo^y 
might harm a patient in such a 
fragile condition- Owing to foe 
convoy's snail-like pace, her 
ambulance did not pass 
through foe gates of P»ue- 
SaJpetriere until 205. some 40 
minutes after leaving tun¬ 
nel and an .hour and 40 
minutes .after the crash. At 
that time of night, foe drive 
from the Alma tunnd to the 

hospital via foe nverfrontdual 

carriageway normally taws 
between five arid tenmuiute^ 

Police Chief 
Massoni, who witnessed ner 

arrival, was shocked by her 

pallor- "I no longer recognise 
thewtmian I bad-seen^in foe 
■ tunnel.” he said. At foatpoirvL 
one doctor noted that site 
suffered Item very 

raric haemorrhaging, quickly- 


they did. instead; H fHeydid 
absolutely everything they 
could to - save her". Thierry 
Meresse. the hospital spokes¬ 
man, said. “They went far 
beyond the bounds of duty, for 
beyond anything that has been 
done before-ltwas a superhu¬ 
man effort.” • 

Superhuman? Ffcr beyond 
anything That has ever been 
done before? - Even allowing 
for the emotion of foe moment. 


not always. “That depends." 
This surgeon continues, “on foe 
extent of foe haemorrhaging. 
If you have a big hole or a 
small hole in a vessel, the 
blood doesn’t flow out at foe 
same rate. Those who arrive 
[alive] are foe ope who have 
incomplete nipt • .s of foe 
vein. That can happen. The 
proof is’ that this patient arri¬ 
ved alive at foe hospital, so 
there must not have been a 
complete rupture.” 

Another French physician, 


‘What I’m saying is this, if 
they’d have gotten her there in an 
hour, they might have saved her’ 


the language sounds a bit 
excessive. As if to dispel any 
suspicion . that, had things 
been done differently, the Prin¬ 
cess might still be alive today: 
It'S a legitimate question.' 

No autopsy was undertaken 
in France: and foe results of 
the British autopsy remain a 
secret Thus it is impossible to 
know foe precise details of her 
injuries, the size of the rupture, 
the extent of other passible 
internal lesions that could also 
have contributed to _ foe 
Haemorrhaging. But since the 
published and unpublished 
reports have focused on' the 
tom pulmonary vein- as foe 
central cause of death, if is 
worth examining foe precise 
nature of this kind of injury 
and the chances of survival. 

“The pulmonary van is a 
large vessel that empties into- 
foe left atrium of foe heart." 


the head of emergency services 
at a large Paris hospital, says 
the tact that foe Princess did 
not die immediately of a 
massive haemorrhage indi¬ 
cated tftar the tear in the 
pulmonary vein was "either a 
small one" or that it was 
partially dosed. Thus it might 
ha-re been possible to save ner 
“with some luck and intelli¬ 
gence” — if that was her only 
internal lesion. 

These physicians are careful 
to point out that they do not 
hare enough precise informa¬ 
tion about foe nature and 
extent of Diana's injuries to 
come to any definitive conclu¬ 
sions about her case. Freer to 
analyse and speculate is Dr 
John Ochsner. 70. Chairman 
Emeritus of Surgery at 
Ochsner Clinic in New 
Orleans, and one of America's 
preeminent cardiovascular 


TOMORROW 




• What were 
Diana’s last 
words and 
when were 
they spoken? 

% What were 
her plans for 
the future? 

• Was she 
aboutto 
marry Dodi 
and whom 
would she 
tellfirsit? 


ration fro foe heart (ie, the 
left atrium is sucking the 
blood in from foe left pulmo¬ 
nary veinl. So the lowest the 
pressure ever is. is when foe 
blood is flowing into the heart. 
In contrast, when it’s going out 
of the heart (through the 
aorta], it’s foe highesi pres¬ 
sure. So foe reason |Diana] 
didn't bleed out right away is 
that foe tear was probably 
dotting and because the pres¬ 
sure there is so modest" 

Would a person in that stale 
_______ have any chance 

" of survival? 

“Sure.” says 
Ochsner. “de¬ 
pending on the 
CkY\ size of the rent, or 

tear. If it wasn't 
too big. they could 
PT* 5 put the patient on 

***- a heart-lung 

machine and just 
go in and do Jthe 
repair) etectivety. If you can 
get them in foe hospital and on 
a heart-lung machine early 
enough you can save them. 
' But time is of foe essence." 

Precisely. It took an hour 
and 40 minutes from the rime 
of the aeddent to the rime the 
Princess entered the operating 
room. What was going on 
during all that time? First, it 
took 15 minutes for the first 
fully equipped SAMU ambu¬ 
lance and its doctor to reach 
foe scene. Second, it was a 
slow, delicate operation to get 
Diana out of the car. Third, 
she received extensive treat¬ 
ment on site, lasting between 
30 and 45 minutes, before foe 
ambulance moved. Once in¬ 
side foe large, box-like SAMU 
ambulance, the Princess was 
put in an JV drip (essentially 
liquids and dextrose), intubat¬ 
ed. attached to an artificial 
respirator and given external 
cardiac stimulation. It is very 
different in America, where 
accident victims are scooped 
up and rushed to hospital. 

"The philosophy in France 
is to try to stabilise the patient 
as much as you can. because 
travelling with this kind of 
status can be very dangerous 
for a patient," said Mailliez, an 
experienced emergency doc¬ 
tor. "So we try to restore a little 
bit of blood pressure and some 
other things before we start to 
drive." Similarly, says 
MailliQL it is not uncommon 
for emergency doctors to tell 
ambulance drivers to go slow¬ 
ly. A spokesman for the 
French hospital system con¬ 
firms that the ambulance 
“slowed down and rolled gent¬ 
ly. ft’s common sense: any 
person in a SAMU vehide Is 
already receiving medical 
treatment, so they don't drive 
at speed." 

Ochsner takes issue with 
such reasoning. “You couldn't 
try -to repair foal injury on the 
scene, you'd have to lx in foe 
hospital." he says. The exter¬ 


nal chest massage would prob¬ 
ably be “foe worst thing that 
could happen", he argues. As 
for foe go-slow driving fech- 
nique to avoid shocks and 
bumps. Ochsner bristles. 
“Shocks and bumps? You 
know, if you're trying to save a 
life, you have to ger them to foe 
operating room quickly." 

So could foe Princess have 
been saved jf she had reached 
the hospital earlier? 

"I c-Yl second-guess any¬ 
body-." Ochsner says. “\Vhai 
l*m saying is if it was a small 
rent, a patient would have 
plenty of time. But if it's big 
enough where it's slowly 
bleeding, as hers was — 
something between a minor 
tear and a complete bleed-out 


want 


— there had to be some 
resistance of flow, with a clot 
or something. Otherwise, she 
would have bled out. Whar I'm 
saying is this: given that she 
was still alive after nearly two 
hours, if they'd have gotten her 
there in an hour, they might 
have saved her." 


O chsnerls view is 
supported by Dr 
David Wasserman. 
45. an American 
physician with nine years' 
experience working in the 
emergency rooms of some of 
the country’s busiest urban 
hospitals, including New Jer¬ 
sey's Hackensack Medical 
Centre. “You could never diag¬ 
nose that kind of injury in foe 


field, never. In the US foere’d 
be hell to pay in a case like this 
— lawsuits, internal investiga¬ 
tions. Spending all that time 
on on-site treatment was abso¬ 
lutely the wrong approach for 
this patient.” 

While nor accusing any 
individual medical worker of 
professional errors in treating 
the Princess — indeed, they 
clearly followed standard 
French procedures — Wasser¬ 
man argues that the fault lies 
with foe whole French ap¬ 
proach to emergency medi¬ 
cine. “Stabilising patients in 
foe Held is a mistake we made 
for decades in the US before 
we abandoned in favour of foe 
scoop-and-run method about 
len years ago." he says. 


It seems that fate was not 
kind to foe Princess of Wales 
during her last visit to Paris: it 
pur her in foe path of foe 
paparazzi, in the hands of a 
drunken driver, and in the 
care of an emergency medical 
system ihat — despite its 
overall high quality and the 
best efforts of highly skilled 
doctors — may have had a 
disastrous method of dealing 
with her kind of injury. 

• ©Thomas. Sand on and Scon 
MacLeod WB 

• Death of a Princess: An In¬ 
vestigation by Thomas Saneinn 
and Scon MacLeod is published 
today by Wetdenfeld and Nicol- 
son'ElS.99. Readers can buy the 
book by calling the times 
Bookshop on 0090134459 


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6 


18 


THE TIMES TUESDAY FEBRUARY JO 1998 


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Portrait of 
the artist as 
a young pupil 

Creativity can’t be taught in the 
classroom, says Alain de Botton 


S ome societies have val¬ 
ued military prowess 
(Ancient Rome), others 
civic virtue (Venice in the 14th 
century), a few the ability to 
shoot birds with a blowpipe 
from 30ft (the Tupi-Kawahib 
Indians of central Brazil). It 
seems that our own has devel¬ 
oped a particular predilection 
for creativity. The admirable 
citizen should these days be 
able to display plentiful evi¬ 
dence of creativity; in the 
workplace, kitchen and bed¬ 
room, If Flaubert could have 
updated his Dictionary of 
Received Ideas (Paris. 1880), he 
might have found room for the 
word between creole and crim¬ 
inal (i creativity .: can’t do with¬ 
out it in business; strive to 
express your own; Britain has 
it in spades; Jane Austen and 
Terence Conran). 

And now news arrives from 
David B!unkerf’s office at the 
Department for Education 
and Employment: a govern¬ 
ment committee, an impres¬ 
sive one with Sir Simon Rattle 
and Sir Claus Moser on 
board, has been formed to 
look into ways of fostering 
creativity' in schoolchildren. 
Creative industries are vital to 
Britain, worth about £50 bil¬ 
lion a year, and E10 billion in 
exports. Can’t ignore that 

Chris Smith, the _ 

Culture Secretary, 
agrees: “It's not just 
about what is best 
for pupils, It* also 
about what’s best 
for the modem Brit¬ 
ish economy." 

It would be easy 
lo smirk at this no¬ 
ble exercise. But __ 
perhaps we should, 
if not smirk, at least analyse 
the grounds for scepticism 
about a well-meaning attempt 
to enhance the creativity of the 
next generation. 

The problem may lie in part 
in a contradiction between the 
words teaching and creativity, 
a contradiction winch most 
forcefully emerges if we imag¬ 
ine Chris Smith suggesting to 
Shakespeare’s parents that the 
lad might, before cackling a- 
theatrical career, take a cre¬ 
ative writing class. Truly cre¬ 
ative achievements seem 
connected with breaking rules, 
teaching with enforcing them. 
Maths is a good subject to 
teach, because it has objective 
priori piles, certifiable conclu¬ 
sions and transparent meth¬ 
ods — the creation of 
masterpieces of literature 
or dnema seems far more 
elusive. 

There may, of course, be a 
few things to teach someone 
seeking to write a book or 
shoot a film (it helps to have 
read other people's books and 
know a bit about camera 
angles), but these would not 
give anyone the key to the 
production of great art At 
best we need to know what the 
rules are, so we may break 
them more intelligently. 

Creativity might be defined 
as informed irreverence. For 
Proust it meant doing things 
slightly differently from any¬ 
one else. "Every writer is 
obliged to create his own 
language, as every violinist is 
obliged to create his own tone. 

1 dont mean to say that I like 
original writers who write 
badly. I prefer those who write 
well, but they only begin to do 
so at the condition that they 


What would 
Shakespeare 
have learnt 
at a writing 
class? 


are original, that they cease 
imitating.” 

The promotion of creativity 
by the Government also seems 
dependent on a peculiar con¬ 
cept that creativity is some¬ 
thing positive, democratic and 
cheerful (the new BA tail-fins 
are perhaps the best example 
of this spirit of new Labour 
creativity). But creativity usu¬ 
ally emerges from deep dis¬ 
tress. and is closely tied to 
negativity and destruction — 
consider Baudelaire, Cole¬ 
ridge and Van Gogh's ear. Or 
King Lear, Crime and Punish¬ 
ment and The Seventh Seal. 
Creative achievements are 
typically closer to the anguish 
of Pascal T All of man’s unhap¬ 
piness stems from his inability 
to stay in a room alane") than 
the innocent optimism of the 
Spice Girls. 

Moreover, the attempt to 
justify the new creative com¬ 
mittee on economic grounds is 
particularly open to question. 
Given the amount of money 
that creative enterprises ap¬ 
parently generate, one can 
understand government min¬ 
isters’ impatience to harness 
this force for the Treasury — 
rather like a former deriding 
to grow strawberries in green¬ 
houses, rather than relying on 
stray ones in the wild. But 

_ attempts to breed 

creativity on a com¬ 
mercial basis meet 
with infinitely less 
success than the cul¬ 
tivation of straw¬ 
berries. 

It is not for noth¬ 
ing that the idea of 
Ihe Muse has had 
such a long life, 
capturing the no¬ 
tion that the creative person is 
not entirely in control of what 
enables him or her to produce 
great art. Even scientific re¬ 
search institutes know that 
one has to lavish enormous 
sums — and that even then, 
there is no guarantee of re¬ 
turn. Milan Kundera may 
have done an enormous 
amount for Czech tourism, 
Vermeer for Amsterdam. 
Dickens for London, but these 
are inddentai. erratic benefits 
— which is why the most 
creative minds have so often 
been ignored by the very types 
who later trumpet their 
achievements as contribution 
to the gross national product. 


Ti 


I here are of course a few 
things one may do to 
help to foster creativity, 
bur they often don’t look like 
creative initiatives at all (don't 
forget that the greatest patron 
of British commensal creativ¬ 
ity was. until the current 
reforms, the dole, which en¬ 
abled many or our most suc¬ 
cessful pop groups to live 
while cutting their first al¬ 
bums). And to be dark but 
truthful, let's not forget how 
many creative achievements 
have arisen out of extreme 
suffering (Dickens in the 
blacking factory, Kafka and 
his humiliating father). 

All of which are just a few of 
the reasons for scepticism as 
we attend the birth of Mr 
Blunketfs crisply titled Nat¬ 
ional Advisory Committee on 
Creative and Cultural Educ¬ 
ation. 

The author's most recent book 
is How Proust Can Change 
Your Life. Picador. 



BEST INTERNATIONAL SR602 DUO 


A fair cop, Mr Straw 


E vening, all. Down here at 
Dock Green nick. I don’t 
mind telling you, we think a 
lot of Jack Straw. Talks a lot 
of common sense about rogues and 
squeegee-merchants, and knows a 
dung or two about giving youngsters 
a good talking-to. Pull 'em up before 
they turn into real villains, that’s 
what I always say. Anyway, now he’s 
back from meeting community po¬ 
licemen in Baltimore to tell us that 
our PC Dixon was a better type of 
copper than all those noisy beggars 
on the telly who kick down doors and 
hire fat psychiatrists and wave guns. 
And. quite frankly, use the kind of 
dirty language that we down ar Dock 
Green never find any call for. Mr 
Straw wants to turn the clock back, 
and a good thing too. That body- 
armour was giving me gyp with ray 
sciatica. Mind how you go. 

Fade up the gentle, whistling 
signature tune, and let the majestic 
figure of Jack Warner plod off into 
the foggy London night, vindicated. 
The Home Secretary has bravely 
dared to invoke the derided image of 
Dixon of Dock Green. Flying in the 
face of fashion, he says: “The police 
role should be defined not just as 
catching offenders. The greater po¬ 
tential should be in working in 
communities.” He wants them visible 
on the street, he wants them down in 
the youth dubs, he wants them 
solidly reassuring rather than 
macho. A "Home Office source" even 
raised the unmentionable fact thai 
some recruits have no particular 
desire to help the community but join 
hoping for “an adrenalin rush". 
Which, of course, bears the same 
relevance to useful policing as a taste 
for bungee-jumping does to the 
profession of steeplejack. PC Dixon 
would think adrenalin undignified: 
even when the kid shot him dead in 
TTie Blue Lamp he was trying to calm 
the situation down, not heat it up. He 
would have been horrified by the 
schoolboy l heard on local radio ar a 
police recruiting event who said — 
unchallenged by the surrounding 
officers — that he plans to join the 
police so as "to go on raids, and burst 
in. an’ that". 

Mr Straw’s vision of a warmer 
relationship between coppers and us 
(how long before they call ir a People's 
Police?) is worth one cheer, at least. 
We are policed by consent, not force, 
and if the trust between police and 
public breaks down we are lost. Trust 
is an emotional and partly irrational 


The Home Secretary is right — a 
civilian police force should, at its 
very heart, always strive to be civil 


thing, to be carefully fostered: not just 
by avoiding major incidents of cor¬ 
ruption or brutality, but through 
small, everyday contacts. 

Aloof, abrupt, macho, threatening 
figures in squad cars with the peaks 
of their hats pulled hard down over 
their eyes do not inspire either 
affection or trust Explosions of nervy 
anger do not make for a sense of 
stability. Even the smallest things 
grate: if one of your brake-light bulbs 
goes and you are flagged down, you 
do not warm to the arrogant young 

copper who walks round your car . _ . ._ 

with aPaxraan sneer before embark--- There will always' Be'a''need foe 


police work not to let this happen. 
Straw and Baltimore are right "Zero 
tolerance" will take us only some of 
the way. for the rest there is a 
relationship to be nurtured. Of 
course the police should put pleasant 
authoritative figures into youth clubs, 
and visit schools, and walk the street 
Of course they should recruit as 
strongly from the ranks of friendly 
idealists as from the macho hard' 
men. They have to make it dear, at 
every level, that the snarling, snap¬ 
ping. sneering tough-guy culture of 
TV cop shows is an unhelpful fiction. 

iiiaM tuHi .iurtiw- 1 — 1 rALwf* fry¬ 


ing on a spg-song 
routine including 
the words: “Hub¬ 
by’s car, is it mad¬ 
am?" It takes heroic 
selfrestraint not to 
snap bade “Look, if 
you're that bloody 
offensive to a meek, 
middle-aged 

woman going hos- ■ .. . _ — 

pital visiting, whar 

are you like with people you really 

suspect?" 

It is not hard io guess. I remember 
the shock when we took a 13-year-old 
holiday guest a tough kid from 
Hackney, to the local carnival and 
she looked out of the car window and 
said: "Wass all this filth, then? 
There’s filth everywhere — let’s get 
aht of this." Following her gaze, we 
saw- a couple of policemen directing 
traffic into the church car park. To us 
rustic innocents they were as un¬ 
threatening as bollards — but to her 
they meant trouble. This child saw 
their uniforms with instinctive, guilty 
hostility: admittedly she had some 
reason to, but her conversation made 
it dear that the police had been her 
enemies long before she was big 
enough to nick car radios. You could 
even surmise that the nicking was 
partly motivated by this sense of 
enmity: if those who guard the law 
are natural foes, what could be more 
satisfying than to break their law? 

Kids who feel that way pass on the 
dislike to their own children, and it 
should be one of the first axioms of 


i‘ . <.«■ 



special squads, dan-- 
gerous-duties, and a. 
scattering - of - riot 
gear and bullet¬ 
proof vests and 
guns and gas: popu¬ 
lar fiction and docu¬ 
mentaries will 
always feed an 
these things. But a 

- - - civilian police force 

should never forget 
that its core, its very heart, should be 
civil in all senses of the word. 

Some manage ft. There are still 
middle-aged officers who say with 
pride that they have never had then- 
truncheon out in twenty years, even 
in the toughest work; but they will 
ruefully add that some of their 
colleagues mix it physically most 
nights of the week. Some forces 
seriously involve themselves in the 
community, even attempting a 
moderated version of the old “village 
bobby” system. But time is no praise 
or kudos in being good at community 
policing. It does not show up in the 
figures. It struggles against too many 
currents. 

The first is the onrush of traffic 
work. It is probably impractical to do 
as some senior officers would like 
and get motoring offences hived off 
elsewhere, but it should be recog¬ 
nised that the growth of difyirrg has 
placed an in tolerable strain ret Sir 
Robert Peel’s idea of a benevolent 
police force keeping the Queen’s 
peace for her subjects. An idealistic 
recruit— and my Hendon mote tells 


me these still exist in surprising 
numbers — will be flattened pretty 
quiddy by the boring, apparently 

istswith out-afdate tax discsor their 
front wheels on a pedestrian cross¬ 
ing, and sitting in a police car with* 
radar gun. 

This leads on to tile second prob¬ 
lem, the tyranny of performance 
targets and indicators. Our idealistic 
recruit rapidly discovers that he wiO 
be judged not by an ability to defuse 
situations, impress children into be¬ 
having better in public; break up 
fights at dosing time and appear just 
in time to extract a frightened girl or 
an Asian boy from the centre of a 
street-corner gang. His promotion 
and reputation will depend only on 
how many charges he can “put 
through" in a week. "Go and get 
. same motorists and D&Ds for your 
book, lad, or you11riewa;getnri,"says 
the sergeant, meaning’well. Fur ihe 
police are as tainted as-any modem 
organisation fay the modish mintage 
raent-school fret about” progrtfe- 
ebasing and target-setting. Some fed 
once calculated that a beat police 
officer will detain a bwglkr oniycnce 
in 40 years, and that figure has 
haunted chief constables ever since. 
Never mind that beat policemen may 
have an immeasurable effect an 
preventing crime. Only the measur¬ 
able is respected. 

T hen there is the paperwork. 
If Mr Straw really wants 
police to run youth dubs, he 
will either have to hire a tot 
of new ones or dse reduce the 
monstrous burden of bureaucracy on 
the ones he already has. It should not 
take 13 pieces ctf paper to process a 
simple offence. It should not be 
necessary for police officers to waste 
whole days hanging around to give 
piffling bits of evidence in court, only 
to find that the accused is elsewhere 
or the case delayed. Some of the 
paperwork is obviously necessary, 
but some is caused fay the fear of 
complaints, and yet more fay the 
insatiable appetite of central govern¬ 
ment for statistics. And if I know 
anything about paperwork, some of it 
will be generated by nothing but its 
own momentum. 

Machismo, management mantras, 
mounds of paper and than before 
you get round to. fighting the actual 
crimes. Good luck to tire Home 
Secretary. Let us all whistle, the 
Dixon theme, and hope. 


Goal feast 

ENGLAN D*S World Cup warriors will forgo the delights of bouillabaisse 
in favour of chicken and chips during their bid for glory in France. Glenn 
HoddJe. the national coach, has decreed that the local seafood delicacies of 
Marseilles could upset his delicate charges and so an English chef has 
been appointed to accompany them, thus satisfying the culinary needs of 
Mr Paul Gascoigne and his colleagues. Roger Narbett. head chef oF the 
Lygon Arms Hotel in Broadway, will swop his usual menu of marinated 
rabbit fillet and caramelised red 
onions for more traditional fare. 

"ill be serving up chicken, rice and 
steamed vegetables — lots of 
carbohydrates," says Narbett, who 
trained with the Roux brothers and 
Aston Villa schoolboys; and whose 
brother John turned out for Ches¬ 
terfield. “It's all part of the team 
effort. Pm sure the French chefs 
will make me very welcome.” 

The Gauls are cross. “1 find it 
quite amusing.” sneered Andre 
Bisson, chef to the French football 
team and proprietor of Restaurant 
Bisson, near Versailles. “I suppose 
he is going to make your Yorkshire 
pudding and steak and kidney pie. 

1 will be giving my boys fresh 
smoked salmon." 

M Bisson has dearly never 
cooked for England's wonder 
winger, my colleague Steve 
McManaman. “The days of a steak 
before kick off to build up your 
strength are long gone," said 
Macca as he prepared to pepper 
the Chile goal with shots. “It is 




• THE ICA cherishes performance 
artists; but is it now going a little 
far" One such. Joshua Sofaer. has 
delivered a lecture in “a grey suit 
with the buttocks cur out, exposing 
his (painted; golden behindThe 
ICA explains , helpfully, that this 
was “a wry way of symbolising the 
transgressive aspect of the ICA". 


work at the Commons in the gents' 
loo." says Ruffley. 


What's cookin'? Narbett Macca 

even more important for a chef to 
travel to the World Cup when we 
are away for a long time in 
somewhere like France.” 

•SMOOTH David Ruffley. MP. 
a likely beneficiary of promotion 
on the'Opposition ' benches, looked 
unduly rough on TV the other day. 
The reason? Anglia, a television 
station controlled by the socialist 
philanthropist Lord Hollick. had 
no make-up girts on hand, because 
of cost cutting. “/ was reduced to 
repairing the damage of a week’s 


Polly gone 

WILLIAM HAGUE’S maternal 
aunt — known affectionately as 
Pollywobbles to ihe Opposition 
Leader — has failed io revive the 
family’s political fortunes. Mary 
Jefferson, who still lives in ihe 
Yorkshire parch where her nephew 
grew up. stood as a Conservative 
for a seat on the Labour-controlled 
Wickersley Parish Council. In¬ 
stead. votes went overwhelmingly 
to Sue Ellis, a Labour stalwart. I 
am assured that Ms Jefferson's 
family ties did nor influence the 
good folk of Wickersley either way; 
ihe vote reflected parochial con¬ 
cerns. “She^ a delightful lady," 
says Beryl Bfllington. the councils 
leader, **Around here, we take 
people on their individual merits.” 


Going, going 

SO farewell, then, Harriet 
Harman? The Social Security Sec¬ 
retary, who has kept jokesmiths in 
work since the election, might be 
demoted. Despite her puppy-like 



devotion. 1 hear that Tony Blair is 
likely to move her in his first re¬ 
shuffle. Her possible replacement 
in the reshuffle? The captivating 
Margaret Beckett; a safer operator. 
"At least Margaret understands 
how the system operates." I am 
told by a senior Cabinet figure. You 
swine, Frank Field.. 

• THE perils of having lunch arSt 
James's Palace. Stuart Upton, the 
property magnate, lost his shoes: 
"Somebody stole them while / was 
eating. / sometimes take them off. 
in restaurants, but I know of worse 
habitsEating often causa Up- 
ton difficulties. “/ wrote to Anton 
Mosimann because a meal hot. 
poor He tore up my membership - 
card. He can’t stand the heat." 



(AwrrSfc otxMPies 



a 
a 

e— 

- O O “ 

* * » ■ » . 

"7V--V 

-rd no kiaz British Ran was 
sponsoring if 



Peter principle 

NIGHTCLUB lothario Petm String- 
fellow continues his education with 
an address to the Oxford Union. 
His wQl be part of a series, featur¬ 
ing other would-be London Lord 
Mayors, Lord Archer of Weston- 
super-Mare and Ken Livingstone. 
"My candidature is now a genuine, 
possibility." he ventures. It all his 
girlfriends vote, he might win. ■ - 

• URSULA ANDRESS . Swedish 
film diva, is to make her art house 
debut. Despite the artistic creden¬ 
tials of Cremaster 5 — shot inside 


Andress: for arfssake 


Budapest Opera House — Ms 
Andress will be doing what- she 
knows best. She plays the Queen of 
Chain, dad in Mack silk. Boosting 
the testosterone quotient. Mat- 
1 hew Barney, her coactor. rides on 
a horse in only a black cloak. 
"Matthew gets his kit off," says a 
big red. "Its a highly sensual 
piece. There are lots of naked 
.nymphs, all in the name of qri ef 
aw/sk" But Ms Andress, now an 
important artist, does not undress^ 
entirety. *. 

Jasper Gerard 



on the 
Rhine 

Anatole Kaletsky 

predicts a rustbelt 
future for Germany 


A popular prejudice about econ¬ 
omists asserts that in any 
debate between two econo¬ 
mists you will hear at least four 
different opinions. Thus when I» 
German professors of economics 
published a joint manifesto yest er d a y 

to call for an “orderly postponement 

of the European single currency, mis 
was treated as an important event. 

In reality, however, economists 
agree about major issues much more 
Sen than they disagree. A dear 
majority of academic economists has 
always been sceptical about the 
wisdom of monetary union. Even in 
such pro-EMU countries as Italy, 
Holland and France, most academics 
acknowledge thar Europe is far from 
satis fying the theoretical require¬ 
ments fra: what economists call an 
“optimal currency area*. 

Economists all agree that Euro¬ 
pean workers are Jess-Kkety than 
Americans to move in search of jots, 
if only because of differences in 
language. No economist denies that 
coordination of Europearrpoiides an 

taxes, social security and public 
spending is extremely tweak, making 
the euro more rfiffiruh td manage 
than the dolls'. And all economists 
know that Germans wiB refuse to 
allow their taxes to support the 
jobless in Spain or vice versa. 

In the absence of these aijd other 
conditions for an optimal currency 
area, the single current will be a 
very im p erfect creation. But tj) prove 
that the euro will be highly in\perfect 
is not the same as to prove that it will 

end in disaster. In the real world, as 
opposed to die academic textbooks, 
most economic institutions are very 
imperfect Just because Europfe vio¬ 
lates the ideal conditions for a single 
amenity does not mean that ENfU is 
doomed to failure. \ 

The much more important 
objection to the single currency, at 
feast from Germany's standpoint, is 
one that is much more practical and 
embarrassing. Indeed, it is so practi¬ 
cal that few economists deignl to 
discuss ir—and so embarrassing nat 
no German politician dares to nfen- 
tfoofcataiL . ! 

This ejection is simply that 
Germany today is uncuriiptritive 
with Ihe restof Europe. To employ ah 
average^production worker .in. a , 
faSbry W tfStehi Germany hosts 
around DM4& Bat the sauna tebour 
;cafl be bought in France for DM31, in 
'Britain -ahd-Italyffor DM2P*nft inr 
■ Spain for DM24. In today’s Europe, 
businesses that employ Gesman 
workers suffer a cost disadvantage of 
between 35 and 50 per cent '■ 

German productivity is taiso rela¬ 
tively high; and in many industries 
investment, innovation aril quality 
are more important than~wage costs: 
Tins is why-;German a mpanfes- 
continue to make big profits and to 
expat successfully despite tkdr very 
high costs. But in buildizq a new 
factory, any management v orth its 
'saltwill try to incorporate he best 
technology and achieve the highest 
possible productivity, whenver the 
factory is. There may be' k rations, 
such as Portugal or Polanc where 
worid-dass productivity is raid to 
achieve; because of geograpfty, infra¬ 
structure or culture. But tbdte is no 
reason why a new fedtoiy in Ger¬ 
many should be more effidi nt titan 
one' in northern Italy or France. 
Germany's"cultural advanta ;es"are 
unlikely to offset a difference rf30or 
40 percent inlaboOT costs. 

ermany may stiff be the 
industrial hcartlai d of 
— — Europe, but Pittsburj ft, Chi¬ 
cago and Detent-were the industrial 
heartlands of America in the 1960s 
and 1 970s. piis did not prevent them 
-fiiran suffering two decades of severe 
pam and social dislocation wheel'the 
American economy was exposed to 
wternaticmal competition in the 
1970s. If monetary union goes ahead, 
as it surely wffl, with Europe’s labour 
costs as out of kilter as they are today, 
Germany ^too could suffer from years 
or even decades of mass uneniploy- 
ment tow investment and ddndust- 
rialBtofon/ . Gttmaify after EMU 
coato become the rostbeftof Europe, 
fan Detroit it took .many- years for 
workers and their unions to under¬ 
stand ^tiiat their wages and benefits 
rapst be reduced to coa^ete wfth tfie 
cheap sunbelt states such as Texas 
.toto Tfarmessee. There is nothing in 
the record dfGcansai politics ortrade 
unionism whkh suggests that Ger¬ 
man workers *31find this adjust¬ 
ment easier than did the workers of 

the American Mid West. 

But bcnwtt tins threat to Germany 
SSTS £^L EMU? Until the-fate 

retyon raptf mSstum toumfenhiiw 
then- neighbour^ competitiveaas. 
evat when foe mark became tea^jo- 
rarity overvalued, as ft 



fort the pre 
EMU has pushed French 
wflstan below the Ger 
Wifo no hope of euro 

^ntsnrtiifoencesiiih 
g *S“wJb EMU wfll 
tbete competitive! 
anting tnefr-awn wae«- 

CT-wryfy described this 

of EMU: Gi 
®rced eretyone else to, 
so Gernwi virtue.-wiii 
He was, 

™ tite record. 














5 





XHE TIMES TUESDAY FEBRUARY 101998 


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„ - _Mr 

Brown ; most announce the appointment of 
the next Governor ofidie Bank of England. 
Eddie Georgs, the presort incumbent, 
comes to the end of his term in June: 

-Th e derision woaldjseeni’to be straight¬ 
forward. Mr George has done a generally 
goqd job, contributing: as much as .anybody 
ta ., 1 te healthy condition of - Rritw-h 
economy today. Withmthe framework set 
by the new Government, Mr George has 
performed- competendy, balancing: Ms pri¬ 
mary. ■ responsibility \ tb ; control mflaW 
agamst the. prassutes - from City .com¬ 
mentators to beoomfi what he himself has 
derided as ah "inflation nutter*. He is 
kztowntobeeager.fpcanycKL He is not yet 
60.- He would therefore seem the natural 
candkiate.for^uic^jor five-year term. 

What then is delaying a decision? There 
seem to be £ftnee>'pos$ible arguments, one 
perfectly reasonable, the others reprehen¬ 
sible. The reasonable argument is that the 
Treasury wanteci to compiele the prepara¬ 
tion ofthe new Bank of Rn gfanri Act and to 
settle delicate technical negotiations about 
the Banks intake financin g, before antKmno- 
ing a whrfe- zww administrative structure, 
with contimhty underlined by Mr George’s 
reapp ointme nt as Governor. • 

TIbb reprehensiblearguments agamst Mr 
George rdafte to his political independence. 
Same enthusiasts for the single currency 
think that Mr George cazmot be trusted to 
give has wholehearted backing to any 
decision by- the Government to join' the 
European monetary union. Last week the 
Financial Times, which led the abortive 
campaign, to bounce TanyBIair into an 
EMU conmnitment^pablished an attack on 
Mr George’s European credentials. The 
said, was “ outspokenly scep¬ 
tical” abdut Britain’s early membership of 
the euro dub. If the Government decided to 
I the Britishpeople to back the euro, 
MrGecdeewouldbeurisuitedtolead“apro- 


There also appear to be senior dements in 
the Government who fear that thej Bank 
could damage Labour's rejection chances 
by allowing the economic qyde to move out 
of phase with the ejection cyde. They would 
prder a more reliable political appointee at 
tb^Bazik^nstead of Mr George.. • 

' When it comes to political independence, 
Mr George stands-guilty as charged. Only 
last week he appeared before the Commons 
Treasurycommittee to express “serious 
doubts 1 *; about whether France. Italy and ' 
Spain were ready for EMU. He also noted j 
that high levels of unemplqyznent through-) 
out Europe suggested that the single) 
currency might domore harm than good.! 
His views on these matters would 
support in, Europe. A set of 155 
professors mGerinany have launched a last, 
ditch campaign on the basis that German, 
is not ready for the single currency either. 

At the sametime as^ expressing his honefet 
inteflectual doubts, Mr George has behaved 
with absolute correctness in following the 
Government's official line on EMU. He has 
repeatedly stated that he has no obfjectkinsrn 
principle to joining the single currency ard 
peppers his speeches with references to 
Butein as a “prem". 

- The questions that the Prime Minister find 
caiancdtormust now answer are simple. Do 
they want the Bank run by a man wrth a 
good professional reputation, a realistic 
view about EMU and a strong record of 
putting statutory duties above shotf-term 
political calculations? Were they serious 
about Wanting a non-political monetary 
policy designed to keep inflation perma¬ 
nently under control or was theideosian to 
give independence to the Bank jot England 
just a short-term political wheeze? Do they 
want a yes-man vriiq will turn the Barik into 
an arm of the Government’s public relations 
srnd re-election machine? What the Govern¬ 
ment announces its decision/ the financial 
markets and the voters wSJf be entitled to 
draw some dear cond 


OPAQUE SIGNALS 

Few of Saddam’^ neighbours haye any Interest in .fas survival 


Despite intensive diplomacy by Britain: and United Nations 


resohJtkr, 


tions on Iraq and 


America; Arab opposition to^any, American- , Western faihzre to takeAn equally tough line 
led alrsfrikeonlraq appears to bei mounting. "■ with Israel over peafce.process commitments 

^3 so warped pubfic opinion fliat Palestin¬ 
ian demonstrators! are again calling on 
Saddam to bifid Aviv with Scud missiles. 

Washington has)shown much diplomatic 
agflity in interprering,these opaque signals. 
Neitiier WSBiam/Qfoen nor Maddeine 
Albri^it has sought from Saudi Arabia, 
their key ally, anything the Saudis would be 
reluctant to endorse in public—support for 
military action, b^ises ot overflying rights. A 
public refusal n^akes it harder to support 
America shouM . hostilities begin, whereas 
an unspoken understanding means that in 
the heat of battle such siqport can be given 
without fuss or domestic repercussicms. 
Similarly the; Americans have not de¬ 
manded oflheEgyptians a commitraent that 
finds littie ecfco among a largdy indifferent 
public Instead, Washington has con¬ 
centrated ory assembling a growing Western 
coalition, shaming die wavering Germans 
at the. anfmal defence colloquium and 
efidtxng from Helmut Kohl the kind of 
decisive suipport that matters in Europe. 

Meanwhile, toe Americans cannot be un¬ 
happy jwith the incursion of 7X00 Turkish 
troops (into northern Iraq. The Turks have 
their reasons for wanting to secure their bor¬ 
der, determined to step a new exodus of 
:li refugees and strike at the bases for 
FKK /Kurdish terrorists. The action in- 
pressure on Saddam in the north; 
the Gulf bufid-up will mako it harder for 
him Y>jceep control in the south. The West, 
Russia and even the Arab League are stepp¬ 
ing vp toe pressure. And few of Saddam’s 
interest in his survival. 


yesterday that JoTdad amid not support an 
attack that wotdd hurt oriltotoy fra^s. Tun¬ 
isia and Egypt condenmed any ure^of fraxe 
and Iz^q^ Eorrign Munster, enibaridng on 
his own diplomatic offensive, has garnered 
valuable backing from the Arab League 
Iraq'S Gu/f neighbours are fearful of siding 
with; America, but equally fearful- of Sadr 
dain. Saudi Arabia has been toe most deL 
phkx insisting that it would hold Saddam 
alorie responable for any hostilities but faff¬ 
ing to commit any logistical siqipOFt to tiae 
AmericaiK. Only Kuwait has offered bases. 

Yet Western - statesmen are not _ dis¬ 
couraged. They have found in private 
di.yi^fon more tacit backing far the tough 
Anplo-American line flian leaders have 
declared in public. The Arabs know as well 
_ as jany Western strategist that only; credible 
preparations for a strike will persuade . 
Satddam to back down. They. know, that be 
will thwart' and taunt the West with half- 
prdraises and offers, wrapped in prqpar 
ganrfa. And they know that the more ships,; 
planes arid troops are sent to the Gulf, the 
mojre diplomacy is likely to succeed. 

The Americans, for their part, know the 
Imitations, on Arab leaders. There is little 
pufolic support for a niewGulf ooalition when 
Iraqi troops are not otxupying anotoer Arab 
country. Concern far toe suffering of the 
Iraqi peqple is widespread, and unaffected 
by Western insistence that Saddam himself 
has diverted o&fbrfojod^earnings to his own 
military prograirune^Jbeperceived cha sm 
between Western detennination to enforce 


NEW BRITAIN, OLD MEN 

Women still have to do two jobs at once . 


A woman's lot' is hiirtfly a happy one, &cr 
cording fo a surv^ out yesterday, vto«to 
paints a picture, of ?i groop that feds over¬ 
worked, underpaid, and eshausteu. Nearly 
1 _ix __ (LuMunthr cttrfMKed- SinCG 52 VCT C 00 * 



ot those wno woia ^ 

the chores at home, if is not surpn smgthai 
81 per cent agree that “women are ejected 
to perform too many roles nowadays”. ■ 

ISsjtW. for rop * 

hanajr sdemific. .Althon^rtwasjentto 
25,000 women, lonly ?, e 

respetodents may have been those ™ Wt 
most under stress and wdcotnedapoH ^ 
seemed to be addtressmg toetr proWemsA^ 
tteyiri&t have been those who were.l«urt 
_i _ j kori time m the day to 


me- 


i t&P •*-. 

•*' ' 

m. 

» *** 
f,".W w 

¥*****: . 

* w** 


stretched and uao meuure 

fill but aTengtby questionnaire. 

r- , ^ 

dismissed by ai^r r^utoWe 
But-like many sudi 

17. per cent of women arecmsid^by 
tt^dbese. Two 
denB are unlwppy wtb 

cmthavebemonadwt andjustOP®*?^ 

-, bejieve that 'men tod * am teel 

An extraordinary 88 per cent 


dg»^ssedabouttheir looks.Yet toeseare, on 
the whole, successful and fulfilled women. 
Forty per cart are at management or 
.director- level, and .78 per rent enjoy their 
work. Of those who have a job and a pre¬ 
school ■ chDd, two thirds wild continue 
Wridng eiti^ part-liiite or fuD-trme even in 
an ideal^worid. The trouble is that work does 
ifot stop whea'tftey reath hom& 

. y Even when men help with the household 
chores, it is generally the woman who has to 
take^^nespanability for toe running of toe 
, -home. Iftoe fridge is empty, it is her fault If 
toe children have not done their homework 
: or their FE kit is still in toe dirty latmtoy, it 
' is their mother who will be -Warned: The 
chores themselves may be tiring, but it is toe 
planning that takes the worst toll. No 
wonder that 90 per cent of fosse women feel 
eshausted,-47 per cent "frequently". 

■ ThereJs only one answer fo move to East 
Anglia: Women who live there are the most 
likely to enjoy their job, to consider them- 
sehtes the right weight, to fed very attractive 
to men, to have a “fantastic” sex life and to 
have a partner, who is a “wonderful lover*. 
But most important for those who are 
struggling to combine two jobs ~ one at 
work, the other at home—these women are 
toe most likely to have tracked down that 
elusive beast, toe “new" man. 


LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 

1 Pennington Street. London El 9XN THephone 0171-782 5000 


Iraq: sliin hopes of 
peaceful solution 

From Field.\parshal Sir John Stonier 

Sir, If is hard not to be convinced by 
Simon Jailjcmsis penetrating analysis 
of die prospect of bombing Iraq (arti¬ 
cle,' February 7). Assuming, far a mo¬ 
ment, that the bombers achieve every^ 
thing far which they hope and teat 
thuy sujbceed in destroying all the 
stockpiles of which they know, with¬ 
out spreading any unpfaasanf Wotogi- 
cal agents into the atmosphere, what 
wQl happen then? Will Saddam Hus¬ 
sein £ay: “I’m sony: you must now 
come into Iraq and see if 1 have any 
farther capabilities"? Hardly. 

The conduct of a successful air war 
is a pohritian'S dream; it avoids the 
mu d and blood of a ground campaign 
and enables wars to be fought without 
getting your hands dirty. Unfbnun- 
aieJy air wars are never successful in 
isolation. If you wish to expel an in¬ 
vading dictator from. say. Kuwait or 
the FaOdands. you have to go there 
and drive him out. The same applies 
to stopping him from doing some¬ 
thing you don’t Gke. As Simon Jenkins 
points’out, a land invasion is out of the 
question; in the Gulf War. some 
600,000 troops were needed to do the 
job. 

Perhaps if we attempted to improve 
the lot of Saddam Hussein’s people by 
offering a reduction in sanctions in ex¬ 
change for evidence of his abandon¬ 
ment of weapons of mass destruction, 
a more realistic result might be ach¬ 
ieved. It would certainly be a lot 
cheaper. 

Yours faithfully. 

JOHNSTANTER. 
as from: 

The Cavalry and Guards Club. 

127 Piccadilly. W 1 V 0PX. 

February 7. 

From Captain Richard Sharpe. RN, 
Editor of Jane’s Fighting Ships 

Sir, There seems to be some bewilder- 
meat aver why most of toe naval 
forces gathering in the Gulf are US 
and British, and why many of the UN 
inspectors in Iraq are drawn from the 
same two nations. 

Watching Israel preparing its de¬ 
fence against missiles armed with che¬ 
mical and biological warheads, the 
answer is surely dear. Saddam Hus¬ 
sein not only has these weapons, but 
US Intelligence has established that 
he intends to use them. The source of 
this information wiU have been shar¬ 
ed with the British and the Israelis, 
but certainly not with Russia, and 
probably hot with Ranee. These last 
two natkm&can also see long-term po¬ 
litical and co m mercial advantages in 
not becoming too involved at this 
stage. 

The Rennets' arguments (letter. 
February 9) against pre-emptive 
strikes on Iraqi weapons installations 
are persuasive. But toe even more un¬ 
attractive alternative is to wait for 
Saddam Hussein to make the first 
move, as in the invasion of Kuwait in 
August 1990. This time it might mean 
the massacre of the Kurds, or of the 
people of Tel Aviv, by germ warfare. 

Yours faithfully, 

RICHARD SHARPE, 

Editor, 

Jane's Fighting Ships, 

Foundry House. Kingsley. 

Bond on, Hampshire GU35 9LY. 
February 9. 

From Mr Padraig A McHugh 

Sir, 1 am saddened both by the fact 
that Matthew Flams (article. Feb¬ 
ruary 6 ) considers the trumpet call on 
Iraq uncertain and that he feels him¬ 
self unstirred by it, uncertain or 
otherwise. 

Might I beg that he. for one mo¬ 
ment gives ear to the words attribu¬ 
ted to Edmund Burke: “It is necessary 
only for toe good man to do nothing 
for evil to triumph." 

Yours faithfully. 

P. A. McHUGH. 

Cartref Melys. 
bJPfenDalar, 

-Uanfairfechan, Conwy LL33 ORA. 
February 6 . 

From Professor Emeritus 
Thomas Stapleton 

Sir, On June 9,1994. you published a 
letter from me comparing North 
Korea to a tiger in a comer who may 
take desperate action even though it 
may lead him into fatal danger. He 
can be immediately calmed by throw¬ 
ing him a chunk of fresh raw meat. 

This morning I heard on the BBC 
World Service that die United States is 
sending 200.000 tonnes of food aid to 
North Korea so that it may agree to 
discussions with South Korea. 

Is neft the situation with Saddam 
Hussein somewhat similar? Should 
not now the complete lifting of sanc¬ 
tions against Iraq be offered on condi¬ 
tion to at Saddam Hussein allows free 
and unrestricted access to his suspect¬ 
ed weapon sites? 

Yours sincerely, 

THOMAS STAPLETON. 

The Rxmdry Cottage. 

Lane End, High Wycombe. 
Buckinghamshire HP14 3JS. 

February 6 . 

From Mrs Teresa Briertey 

Sir, An impossible dream, but would 
dearly love to see a squadron of 
British aircraft flying over Iraq in 
order to drop medical supplies and 
food for starving children. 

Yours faithfully, 

TERESA BRIERLEY, 

4 Han well Court. Han well, 

Nr Banbury, Oxfordshire OX171HF. 
February 9. 


Re-evaluating European federalism 


From Mr D. J. Cleeson 

Sir, When recommending that Con¬ 
servatives espouse the cause of Euro¬ 
pean federalism, Tessa Keswick 
f Shift the Tories cannot shirk”, Feb¬ 
ruary 3} could have added that for a 
EurosccptK who genuinely does not 
wish to withdraw from the European 
Union democratic federalism is toe 
most obvious and logical option. 

The main complaints of many 
Eurosceptics are that toe Union is in¬ 
tent upon continuously expanding its 
jurisdiction at the expense of the 
nation state; and char its institutions 
are not properly democratically ac¬ 
countable. 

A truly democratic federal consti¬ 
tution would remove both grievances. 
It would ensure both that there were 
dearly defined and unalterable limits 
to the jurisdiction of die Commission 
and the Council of Ministers and that 
both bodies were effectively controlled 
by a European Parliament possessed 
of suffident powers to impose its will 
within those policy areas for which it 
was agreed the Union should be res¬ 
ponsible. 

Most Conservative Eurosceptics 
constantly claim that they do not wish 
to withdraw’ from the Union. A whole¬ 
hearted commitment to federalism 
would demonstrate their sincerity. 

Yours faithfully. 

DERM CTT GLEESON. 

Hook Farm. White Hart Lane. 

Wood Street, Guildford GU3 3EA. 
February 3. 

From Sir Anthony Meyer 

Sir, Tessa Keswick and Professor 
John Barnes, from whose paper wel¬ 
coming toe prospect of a federal Brit¬ 
ain she quotes, are right toe only an¬ 
swer to the West Lothian question is to 
turn tiie Westminster Parliament into 
a (much smaller} federal parliament 
for the UK. and to set up an English 
parliament — or possibly a number of 
regional English parliaments — to 


deal with the matters which the Scot¬ 
tish parliament will deride for Scot¬ 
land. 

Can we now bury the ludicrous idea 
that federalism means centralisation, 
or that it is incompatible with Conser¬ 
vative principles? Is it rime to recog¬ 
nise that a federal constitution for 
Europe is the surest way to ensure 
that only those derisions which have 
to be taken at European level are tak¬ 
en in Brussels — and that only those 
derisions which need to be taken at 
national level are taken at West¬ 
minster? 

I am, etc, 

ANTHONY MEYER, 
c/o European Movement. 

Dean Bradley House, 

52 Horaefeny Road. SW1P 2AF. 
February 3. 

From Dr Marlin Holmes 

Sir. Whatever the merits of a federal 
Britain, retaining UK influence in 
Europe would not be among them. 
Such a move would accelerate the 
ELI’S creation of a Europe of the re¬ 
gions as the alternative to a Europe of 
nation states, which Conservatives 
espouse. 

It is for this reason the Basques, 
Catalans, northern Italians and oth¬ 
ers are so keen on a process which di¬ 
minishes national sovereignty and 
promotes European federalism. Clos¬ 
er to home, the SNP has changed its 
advocacy of outright independence to 
“independence in Europe" as a way of 
extricating Scotland from the UK. 

Conservatives may need to evaluate 
the Blair Government's constitutional 
changes on a case by case basis, as 
Tessa Keswick argues; but embracing 
federalism in any form is simply play¬ 
ing with fire. 

I remain. Sir. yours etc, 

MARTIN HOLMES 
(Co-Chairman. The Bruges Group), 

44 Park Town, Oxford 0X2 6 SJ. 
Rbruary 3. 


Cost of vaccinations 

From Mr Peter D. Terry 

Sir, Dr R. H. Behrens's letter (Feb¬ 
ruary 2 ) on the cost to the taxpayer of 
travel vaccinations for tourists sup¬ 
plies farther evidence that the NHS is 
now providing services which its 
founding fathers never intended. 

Why, for instance, should tax¬ 
payers' money be spent on such issues 
as ministering to and curing the 
tfrunken louts who regularly fill 
hospital casualty departments? Why 
should free fertility treatment be 
offered by some hospital authorities 
when the last thin§ the country needs 
is a larger population? 

Why should the NHS spend inordi¬ 
nate amounts of money an trying to 
cure people of self-inflicted problems, 
such as drug and alcohol-dependent 
ailments? Why should I. as a rugby 
player, expect it to nurse me bade to 
health after a game injury? 

Until the Secretary of State for 
Health introduces measures which 
will make all the population respon¬ 
sible for their own actions, the NHS is 
going to demand more and more 
money from the taxpayer. 

Yours faithfully, 

P.D. TERRY. 

High Cross. 

Chestnut H31, Cumbria CA12 4LR. 
February 3. 


From Dr Nigel Higson 

Sir, Dr Behrens's proposal that travel 
vaccination should be removed from 
the NHS budget takes no account of 
the adverse effects that such a move 
could have on public health. 

A recent poll demonstrated that 44 
per cent of people travelling to 
medium or high-risk countries failed 
to seek medical advice before travel¬ 
ling. Other surveys show that half of 
those leaving the UK for holidays or 
business travel abroad would not seek 
medical advice or treatment if they 
were charged to do so, and that the 
majority would not complete their 
vaccination course. This has most ser¬ 
ious implications for the development 
of bacterial resistance and for the 
hypersensitivity reactions which 
might occur with repeated partial 
vaccinations. 

The privatisation of travel vaccines 
will result in unnecessary competition 
to sell them without the current inde¬ 
pendent commitment by GPs to coun¬ 
sel travellers and ensure long-term 
and appropriate immunity. 

Yours etc. 

NIGEL HIGSON 
(Co-Chairman. 

Primary Care Virology Group), 
Goodwood Court Surgery, 

S2-S4 Cromwell Road, 

Hove. East Sussex BN3 3DX. 
Rjbruary3. 


‘Titanic’ calumny 

From Miss Jenni Atkinson 

Sir, In the new film Titanic (review, 
Arts, January 22). the ship’s First Offi¬ 
cer, William Murdoch, is portrayed as 
a coward who shoots a panicking pas¬ 
senger and then, overcome by shame, 
shoots himself. Yet survivors’ testi¬ 
mony at the two inquiries quite dearly 
show that Murdoch’s behaviour was 
correct and conscientious. His last 
hours were spent supervising the low¬ 
ering of Lifeboats, even giving away 
his own lifejaeka to a passenger. 

The only shots reported were fired 
into the air, firstly by Fifth Officer 
Lowe to discourage a rush for Boar 14. 
then later by Murdoch to protect col¬ 
lapsible boat B. There is no evidence 
of suicide, and Murdoch was seen 
working to launch toe remaining col¬ 
lapsible boar when the water engulfed 
him- 


The thousands of people who see 
this film will believe a vile calumny on 
a real and honourable man. This is 
surely not right. Members of his fami¬ 
ly are deeply distressed by it in¬ 
cluding Mr Murdoch's nephew, Scott 
Murdoch, who appealed to the film’s 
director a year ago not to misrepre¬ 
sent his unde. 

At the veiy least, Murdoch is owed 
an apology; preferably one projected 
prior to every screening. An alter¬ 
native would be a donation from the 
film’s considerable profits to the Mur¬ 
doch Memorial Prize, a bursary at 
Dalbeattie High School in his native 
town, which perpetuates the name 
this film so cruelly blackens. 

Yours faithfully, 

JENNI ATKINSON. 

34 Burlington Avenue, 

Kew Gardens, 

Surrey TW9 4DQ- 
January 30. 


Pennies in heaven? 

From Mr Jon Prentice 

Sir, Mrs Peter Lows concern (letter, 
February 2) that computers cannot 
cope with toe word “deceased” is justi¬ 
fied. When, some years ago, I inform¬ 
ed toe Prudential of my mother’s 
death, its response was to write to 
“Mrs J. M. Prentice Deceased” and 
offer her life assurance. 

further evidence came later from 
the car dealer with whom I had a fuel 
and servicing account When phone 
caffs, letters and visits failed to get my 
monthly statements sent to os at the 
then correct no 16 instead of to toe in¬ 
creasingly wrathful occupant of no 47, 
I was told their computer would only 
accept the instruction if it was first 
informed of jny decease. 

I rang the accounts department to 
advise them of my death, and had no 
more trouble. 

Yours in resurrection faithfulness, 
JON PRENTICE, 

42a Arlington Road, 

Eastbourne, East Sussex BN201DL 
February 3. 


From Mr Andrew Hardy 

Sir, Nothing is certain but death and 
taxes. Mrs Low’s letter reminds me 
how far the Inland Revenue's hand 
stretches, not only in life but also in 
death. 

It recently informed a widow (as 
executrix) that the tax unpaid fry her 
late husband in 1996-97 wjuld be col¬ 
lected through his 199S-99 code num¬ 
ber. 

Even God has to operate PAYE. 

Yours faithfully, 

A HARDY 
(Taxation consultant), 

52 Wentworth Drive, 

Bishops Stortford, 

Hertfordshire CM23 2PD. 
tax.helpGdiaLpipex.com 
February 1 


Letters for publication should carry 
contact telephone numbers. We 
regret dud we cannot accept 
letters by telephone but they 
may be sent fay fax to 0171-782 5046. 
e-mail to: lettersGthe-times.co.uk 


Hidden nature of 
Powell’s first love 

From Canon Eric James 

Sir. 1 had expected your headline 
today “Unrequited love drew poetry 
from Powell" to refer, not to Barbara 
Kennedy, but to his earlier homo¬ 
sexual love in Cambridge. 

On April 22.1988,1 spent a morning 
with Enoch Powell discussing the 
Cambridge historian, preacher and 
eccentric, the Reverend F. A Simpson. 
He had given Powell — in hospital at 
toe time — £100 to get his First Poems 
published in 1937. Our conversation 
turned, not surprisingly, to A E. 
Housman’s influence on Powell at 
Trinity College, which, he made clear, 
was related not only to Housman's 
poeny and classical scholarship but to 
Housman’s understanding of the 
homosexual condition. 

Powell gave me that day a signed 
copy of First Poems, drawing my 
attention to certain of those “fifty short 
lyrics" in which he had tried to put 
into words what a homosexual friend¬ 
ship had meant to him. For example: 
Tis true I loved you from the first: 

Yet had l turned away. 

1 should have soon forgot my thirst 
And happier been tt>day. 

For now your face is graven deep 
Upon my" inward sight. 

And when l wake and when I sleep. 

I see you day and night; 

And since our parting is decreed 
By laws we cannot break. 

The severed tissues long will bleed 
And long the wound will ache. 

I promised Enoch Powell 1 would 
not disclose what he had said to me 
about the homosexual basis of certain 
of his poems until after his death. 
Then it would be a matter of literary 
history. 

The poem I quote is now included in 
Collected Poems: Enoch Powell (Bel- 
lew Publishing. 1990). 

Yours sincerely, 

ERIC JAMES. 

II Denny Crescent, 

Kennington, SEI14UY. 

February 9. 


Heath’s silence 

From Sir Julian Critchley 

Sir, Sir Edward Heath's refusal to pay 
public tribute to Mr Enoch Powell on 
his death is in vivid contrast to the 
eulogies offered to Pbwell by Lady 
Thatcher (reports, February 9). Yet Sir 
Edward has every reason to resent 
Powell’S call in February 1974 to the 
electorate to vote Labour, while Lady 
Thatcher did not suffer at Powell's 
hands. But it was in Lady Thatcher’s 
power to send Powell to the Lords. I 
know that Powell held out for an here¬ 
ditary peerage, but that did not pre¬ 
vent Lady Thatcher from giving Har¬ 
old Macmillan and William Whitelaw 
hereditary peerages. Sir Edward has. 
by his silence, at least avoided 
humbug. 

Yours etc, 

JULIAN CRITCH LEY 
(Conservative MP, 1959-64.1970-97). 

19 Broad Street. 

Ludlow. Shropshire SY81NG. 
February 9. 


Traffic jams 

From Mr Ron Sands 

Sir. The Government is to spend £3 
million on a survey to discover why 
motorists are prepared to suffer long 
delays in statiemry traffic jams rather 
than use public transport alternatives 
(report, nfews in brief. February 2). 

The answer is contained in a Coun¬ 
tryside Commission report. Transport 
for Countryside Recreation, publish¬ 
ed m 1974. Under the sub-heading 
Territory" is the following sentence: 
The car provides a personal, private and 
secure environment it has connotations of 
possession, status, and pride. 

Yours faithfully, 

RON SANDS. 

31 Marine Court. 

Morecambe, Lancashire LA3 IDN. 

From Mr C. M. Baldwin 

Sir, Mr Richard Ottaway, MP (letter, 
February 4). describes a narrow, light¬ 
weight, Victorian bridge (ie. Ham¬ 
mersmith) as "a strategic artery of 
London's road system". If true this 
would be a sad reflection on our met¬ 
ropolis: if the bridge were any smaller 
a museum might take it. 

Let's keep it closed to private vehi¬ 
cles of three wheels or more. 

Yours faithfully. 

C. M. BALDWIN, 

44 Elm Grove Road. 

Barnes. SWI3 OBT. 

February 2. 


Numbers and tags 

From Mr Jake Loddington 

Sir. Mr Ben Garrett (letter, February 
6 ) comments on the range of identity 
numbers with which he has to deal. 
My difficulty lies in understanding 
just one of them. 

The student registration number 
supplied to me by a local university 
has 13 digits. I estimate that this 
would cater for toe entire population 
of the world, a thousand times over. 

What have they in mind for expand¬ 
ing their catchment area, I wonder? 

Yours sincerely. 

JAKE LODDINGTON. 

22 Derby Road, Foulton-le-Fylde, 
Lancashire FY 6 7AF. 
jakeGjakeiod.demon.co.uk 
February 6 . 


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COURT 

CIRCULAR 



ST JAM ESS PALACE 
February % The Prince of Wales, 
Vice Patron, this morning opened 
a Development information 

Centre at the British Council 
offices, Kathmandu. Nepal. 

His Royal Highness, accompa¬ 
nied to the airport by Crown 
Prince Dipendna Bir Btfcram Shah 
Dev, afterwards left Nepal for 
Bhutan. 

The Prince of Wales this after¬ 
noon arrived in Bhutan and was 
received at Paro Airport by the 
Minister for foreign Affairs 
(Dasha Dawa Tiering) and Dr 
David Carter (Deputy British 
High Commissioner to die Repub¬ 
lic of India). 

His Royal Highness taler visited 
Kyichu Temple, Ugyen Mri Pal¬ 
ace. Para Dzong and Simtoga 
Doing. 

The Prince of Wales this evening 
attended a Dinner given by the 
Minister far Foreign Affairs. 
KENSINGTON PALACE 
February ft The Duke of Glouces¬ 
ter this evening received His 
Excellency the Ambassador of 
Ukraine and Mrs Komissarenko. 


Today’s royal 
engagements 

The Queen will hold an Investiture 
at Buckingham Palace at 11.00. 
The Duke of Kent wifi attend a 
luncheon given by the Honourable 
Irish Society at the Mansion 
House at 12.05. 


Most Honourable 
Order of the Bath 

A service for The Most Honour¬ 
able Order of the Bath will be held 
in Westminster Abbey on Wednes¬ 
day. May 13, [998. at 11.15am in the 
presence of The Queen. 

Details have been sent to all 
members of the order. If not 
received, please write to the Cen¬ 
tral Chancery of the Orders of 
Knighthood. St James's Palace. 
London SW1A1BH. 


Birthdays 

today 


Mr Larry Adler, mouth organist, 
84; Mr Michael Apud. Rim direc¬ 
tor. 57; Field Marshal Sir Nigel 
Bagnall. 71: Sir Michael Bishop, 
chairman. British Midland Air¬ 
ways. 56; Miss Ohvyn Bowey. 
painter. 62: Dr Alexander Com¬ 
fort, physician, poet and novelist. 
78; Mr John Hayes, former sec¬ 
retary-general, Law Society, S3; 
Professor J. Heslop-Harrison. 
FRS. botanist 7& the Rev Donald 
Hilton, former Moderator of the 
General Assembly of die United 
Reformed Church. 66c Mr Nor¬ 
man Kark. farmer Editor. Courier. 
100. 

Mr Peter Middleton, former 
chief executive. Lloyd's, 58; Lord 
Milne. 89; Mr Greg Norman, 
golfer. 43: Lord Orr-Ewing. 86; Mr 
Nicholas Owen, broadcaster. 51; 
Group Captain Sir Gordon Pine, 
80; Miss Leontyne Price, soprano. 
71; Sir Idwal Pugh, former 
Ombudsman, 80; Miss Gail 
Rebuck, chief executive. Random 
House. 46; Lord Justice Rose. 61; 
Mr Mark Spitz, swimmer. 48; Mr 
Robert Wagner, actor. 68. 


T-tjt? ti mes TUESDAY FEBRUARY K) 1998 

Forthcoming 
marriages 

MrJLP-b.O*»rcfr 

and Sid .floral** 

ZataaljUwga . 

reve engagement- is announced 

between JarnTdctet «B of Rfr 

and Mrs Midae* Onadi. of 
GoriaMQ-'niSzoes, Oxfordshire; 
and ffiti Nocaishah. youngest 
daughter of Wgk Kanwnab and 
Setae Hj. Zainal Afatfin. of 
Bruno. 

Mr DA Clapfcna 

and Ms AC Hoad - _ 

The engagownt » 
between David, elder soa « Mr 

Jackie Clapham, ot Duwm. and 

aux*. dso ^ e L ( US. KiiS? 

Martin Hoad, of Hi* Utaettn. 
Somerset 

JIdMiwESstM. WBams 

The engagement is anaa oaxd 
between MBwdlyamgg^sonjf 
Mr Martin long, «west 






Problem: how to transport L000 shrubs across 26 metres of water to the Serpentine island in Hyde 

14 sappers from the Royal School of Militaiy Engineering in Surrey bridged theja- 

j six minutes and raising £3,050 for the charity Sport Aiding Medical Research for 

A similar operation using small boats in 1985 


Kids (SR 
took several 


i rejuvenate its failing plant life. Sedation: call infhe Army. So. 

* "' nutes 30 seconds—beating then: ovm recoM for putting up 

he shrubs, were then, carried across m less than fouriiours. 
to complete. 


Dinners 

The Royal Academy 
of En gin ee rin g 

Sir David Davies. CBE, FEng, 
FRS. President of The Royal Acad¬ 
emy of Engineering, presided at a 
Lecture and Dinner rad last night 
at 6 Carlton House Terrace. 
London. SW1. Dr Peter Williams. 
CBE. FEng. Chairman of the 
Particle Physics and Astronomy 
Research Council, was the guest 
speaker and spoke on ‘Engineer¬ 
ing in Big Science'. 

The Athenaeum 

The Dean of Norwich was the 
speaker at a talk dinner held last 
night at the Athenaeum. The Rev 
Professor J.L Houlden was in the 
chair. 

Cardiff Business Gob 
The President of Cardiff Business 
Club, Sir Idwal Pugh, the High 
Sheriff of South Glamorgan. Mr 
J.W. Phillips and the Deputy Lord 
Mayor of Cardiff, Cbuncflior Gill 
Bird, were present at a dinner held 
by the Club at the Park Hotel, 
Cardiff last night- The guest 
speaker was the Right Hem Alan 
Clark. MP for Kensington and 
Chelsea. Mr Alan Rosser. 1MC 
Consulting Group, presided. 


Oxfordshire 

lieutenancy 

The following have been appointed 
Deputy Lien tenants for Oxfordshire 
District Judge Aim Campbell. Mrs 
Mayra Haynes. Mr Ian Laing. Mr 
Malcolm Cochrane. Lady Martha 
Rxisonby. I 
Canon Tony' 

Williams. 


y. Brigadier Nigel Mogg. 
wry Williamson and Dr Paul 


Meeting 


Rovai Over-Sens League 
Sir John Chalstrey was the guest 
speaker at a meeting of the Dis¬ 
cussion Curie of the Royal Over-Seas 
League hdd last night at Over-Seas 
House. Si James*. Mis Elizabeth 
Cresswdl presided. 


Royal Air Force College Cranwe] 


Air Marsha] J R. Day. Deputy 
Chief of the Defence Staff 
(Commitments), was foe Review¬ 
ing Officer at the Graduation of 91 
officers of no 169 Initial Officer 
Training Course from Royal Air 
forte College CnuiwcD on Thurs¬ 
day February 5, 

Graduating Officers of No 169 
Initial Officer Training Course" 
General Doties Brandi - Pilot 
Graduating as Flying Officer 
Flying Officers S P Batt BEng. S A 
Berry MEng. R R Chettleburgh 
MSc. A Crichton BEng. R J 
Hillard BA. J D Hudson BA. 1 S 
Lewis BSc. TJ Lindsay BSc, P A T 
Littlejohn BA, D J McKay BSc C 
Nkol MA. A J Soon BSc J R E 
Walls MA. P J Williams BSc Pilot 
Officers J A Beck BEng. V R P 
Butler BSc S J Campon BSc T J 
Clement BSc D C French BEng. J 
M Hynes BMedSc MB BS. W 
Keenan MEng. C RG 1 Lagan BA. 
P J B Marr BEng. S O McCann 
BEng. A D Ouellette BEng. E A 
Robertson BVMS MRCVS. M F 
Rutland BEng, M G Whitnall BA: 
Acting Pilot Officer M W Green. 
General Duties Brandi - 
Navigator 

Flying Officer C M fopp BSc; Pilot 
Officers C A Partition BSc J D 
Kent BEng. DCP Spencer BSc 
Acting Pilot Officer GT Edwards. 
Operations Support Branch - Air 
Traffic Control 

Pilot Officer £ M Smith BA; Acting 
Pitot Officers N J Berry. M J 
Hopkins. 

Operations Support Brandi - 
Fighter Control 

Flying Officers R J Barker BA. A R 
Tindale BSc Pilot Officers M J 
Brunfon BA. D L Timms BA; 
Acting Pilot Officer J P Stanley. 

Support Branch - 
Operations 
Flying Officer J P Matthews; Pilot 
Officer J S Anstey; Acting Pilot 
Officer A A F Brown. 


Operations Support Branch - 
Intelligence 

Pfiot Officers R L SteUitano BA. P 
D Wyatt MA BSc 
Operations Support Braodi - 
Regiment 

Flying Officer R I Appleby BA. 
Pilot Officers A S Brace BA. B W 
Roberts BEng; Acting Pilot Offi¬ 
cers A L Jones. G Ward. 

Engineer Branch 
Flight Lieutenants S J G Green¬ 
land BEng AM1EE. G A Halien 
BEng AMfEE. M Hawley BEng. 
M A Nadin BEng. J Swanson 
BEng AM1EE, M S Wright BEng; 
Flying Officers J N Iddon BEng 
AMIEE. D Robertson BEng 
AMI EE. R Ruben BEng. T A 
Stringer MEng ACGI. M C War¬ 
ren BEng AMIEE: Pilot Officers N 
P Bennett BEng. O A Fashade 
BEng. P W Fawcett MEng, RG S 
Ossetian BEng. N D Smith BEng. 
Supply Braacfa 

Flying Officers G Baker, A C 
Males BSc Pilot Officer N J Bayley 
BSc; Acting PiJot Officer B G 
Braddick. 

Adodmstrative Branch - 
Secretarial 

Flight lieutenant M A.McClel- 
land-Jones BA; Flying Officers D L 
Abdy BA PGCE. F M MacDonald 
BA. K Warwick MA Msc Pilot 
Officers L J Brewer BA. M D 
Hampson BA, H AM LyncfTBA. K 
M McIntosh BA, G R F Thomas 
LLB, P M Todd BSc Acting Pilot 
Officers J R Butler. J C Logan. 

Administr ative Branch-Training 
Flight Lieutenant R D Groom- 
bridge BA PGCE. 

Administrative Branch - Provost 
& Security 

Flying Officer K A Putland; Pilot 
Officer A S J Jarvis BSc 
Admhnstnurve Branch - Pfayriral 
Education 

Flying Officers S J Westoott BA. P 
D Whiting BEd. 


Adnnuistrative Brandi- 
Pitot Officer M A L Cordode 
Foreign and Commonwealth 
Qatar Emiri Air forte 
Fighter Controller 
Second lieutenant H M 
Nooinri- 

Prizew in ners of No 169 Initial 
Officer Training Course 
The Sword of Merit awarded to 
foe RAF cadet who. during Initial 
Officer Training, has demon¬ 
strated outstanding ability, leader¬ 
ship and other officer qualities and 
potential for further development: 
Officer Cadet K A Putland. 

The Hennessy Trophy and Philip 
Sassoon Memorial Prize, awarded 
to the RAF cadet who, during 
Initial Officer Training, has 
proved to be the best all-round 
cadet other than foe Sword of 
Merit winner Student Officer AS 
J Jams BSc 

The British Aircraft Corporation 
Trophy. awarded to the RAF or 
Foreign and Commonwealth cadet 
who has attained the highest 
marks far professional studies on 
the course: Student Officer R R 
Chettleburgh MSc 
Overseas Students' Prize, awarded 
id the Foreign and Commonwealth 
cadet who nas produced the best 
overall performance in leadership, 
officer qualities and professional 
studies. op foe courser Officer 
Cadet H M~Al-No*umi QEAF. 

The Group Captain Williams Me¬ 
morial Trophy, awarded to the 
RAF cadet who has shown foe 
greatest improvement Student Of¬ 
ficer L J Brewer BA. 

The Sarah Moland Memorial 
Prize, awarded to the RAF cadet 
who has demonstrated outstand¬ 
ing qualities of courage and forti¬ 
tude: Officer Cadet K A Putland. . 
The Longcroft Trophy, awarded to 
the cadet who ha* contributed 
most to sport during Initial Officer 
Training: Student Officer S J 
Westcott BA. 


Church news 

The Rev Douglas Robert Holt 
Vicar of St Mary. Eafing (diocese 
London), has been appointed to the 
Residentiary Canonry at Bristol 
Cathedral vacant by foe elevation 
afAfastairUeweQyn John Redfem 
to foe See of Grantham. 

The Rev Alan Paris h, Curate, 
Fatfold (Durham), to be Ptiestin- 
Charge, Presmn-on-Tees All Saints 
(same diocese). 

(The Rev Richard Franklin, Vicar, 
Sr-ffeter and St Paul 
rtsmouih). to be Vicar. Luton' 
Saints with St Peter (St Albans). 
Jane Hedges. • Canon 
tiaiy. Portsmouth St 
s (Portsmouth), to.be also 
in to Women's Ministry 

The ’flpv paul Holley, Curate. 
ToDgeinn Alkrington St Michael 
(Mancfastet), to be Priest-in- 
Charge,’Satford St Philip with St 
Stephentsamediocese). • " 

The Rev Paul Kennedy, Chaplain 
to the farces, to be Priest-in- 
Cbarge, learn Lane St Andrew 
(Durham). . 

The Rev Junes Langstaff, Chap¬ 
lain to the Ushop of Birmingham 
(Birminghan), to be also Priest-in- 
Charge, Shot Heath St Margaret 
(samedii 

Lawrence, Rector. 
to be part- 
St Briavds 
(Gloucester), 
to EtoSUx NSM 
— St Pants An- 
^Valtetta. 
Assistant 
Sr Mary 




The Rev 
Hemingby 
time Priest 
wHewd 
The Rev 
Assistant 
ggcan 

Malta (Europe) 
Curate. Castle 
and St Margaret 
The Rev Marcus 
in-Charge. Hea 
(Manchester): to 
Dean. Heaton 
diocese). 

The Rev David 
Charge. New 
Church (Durham): 
same benefice. 


iiiininghfliw) 

Priest- 
Mersey 
also Area 
{same 

Priest-in- 
Christ 
be Vicar, 


BMDS: 0171 680 6880 
PRIVATE: 0171 481 4000 


PERSONAL COLUMN 


Bowitr m odi we say, our 
womb will always tall short; 
the and of the matter in God 
la «D- Ec c l ostow lcus 43 : 2? 


BIRTHS 


BLAKE - 0U Jammy 30tb at 
The Portland Hospital, to 
Carman and Dultl, a 
vondohl daugh ter. Isabel 


BROWN . On February 7th 
1998, fa Tracey and Andrew, 
a bnadfvl daughter, 
Georgia. Lore always. 

CAKTIAY - On Febramy dth at 
The Portland Hospital, to 
Joanna (p6e ThnemlQ and 
Plaza, a won, Thomas Mn 
Thth a toother fbv Gooege 
and Emily. 

DEVAIMHH-On 8th Fabroary 
1998, to Anita (n«a 


, gin, 

DOHAID ■ On Pahromy flth,in 
London, to Baua and 
Charles, a daoghtat; Sophia, 
a alatar Car Jatoo and Hany. 

DOURUK - On Pahmazy Sth at 
Tba Portland Hospital, to 
NooUe (hde Comnoyar) and 
So hart, a Arnghim: M H Pi t 

DREW - On CAzoary 3zd at 
The PertUnd Hospital, to 
Elisabeth and ffiet, a 


DUSSBt > On FflPnmzy 7th 
1998 to Haiti) (ado 
Chapmen) and Chttatophe^ 
a dau gh ter, Bahakan Hops. 

£AVIS - Oo Pehrasry 5th 1998 
at Columbia Pmsbytedan 
Modical Centra. New York 
dry, to IMM (nde Lanht- 
Draytns) and Peter, s 
danghtez, Wrurfa Hope. 

OlBSOtt - Ob Stb M mu o- f. to 
Cnrbettnc (me Ittbac Bice) 
and W ill la t a, a daughter. 
Tent a states far DmitttVi 
and Angus. 

GUARD - On Pefanary Sid 
1998, to Sarah (ate 
lbcOetnioOandHark.aaoB, 
Theodora J os e ph . 

HILL - On Thursday, 22ad 

January, 1998, todaira (stfe 
Thom Mil) and CUmtfha; 
a ds«ghur, Emily BacSwl 
Amboz. a ateur fin Geotgbia 
Mi 

HOLE - Os 71b Febniary 1998, 
to Blaine and David, a 
d aughter , IMiltiw Boee 
faomoBP 

HOULDSWORTH - On February 
4th, to SOOy and Hath, a eon. 


tSEUH - On February 1st at 
n* Portland Hospital, to 

CE ph n (win 1l h» ffloBmt) 

and William, a beautiful 

dan^da^ Louisa, a sister far 

Ohm 

MAXWBX - Ob January 31»x 
1998, to Caro line (nde 

Wilmst) and Ben, a 
wonderful son, George 
Jaraph. 

HCTJIOH - Os February bth at 

The Portland Hospital, to 

CeKattna (nde Aids) and 

Andrew, a son. WUUaai 

htihiMe KUrtiTteL a brother 


BIRTHS 


Ms riel (aH Letter) and 
Christopher, a daughter, 
Harriet Ann Hoiae. Eny 
duh to the ml d wiraa and 
start a t St Mary's HbepitaL 
Paddington. 

RENFREW KMIOHT - On 
February 3 id at The Portland 
Hospital, to Helena and 
Jonathan, a non, H a rtt u lHan 


RUWU - On January 31st 
1998, to Bub (ade Ktog> 
and Gny, a daughter, 
Aleoacadzn Kate, a states far 
Ten. 

THEOHAHOUK - On February 
dth at The Portland 
Hospital, to Elena end Harry, 
a beautiful eon, George 
Dimitri, a brother lor 

THOMBQM- On January 29th 
1998 in Nottingham, to 
dima-Khrina Cads Chdogan) 
and Gary, a son, Alesander 
Bozy. 

UttOUHART- On February 7th 
1998, to fullst Cuds Ladds) 
mV JlOldO, a ra”, Wtnfafc 
Rupert Unfa a toother Sot 


DEATHS 


ASHBY - On January 31st 
1998 at Dticnbfa Devon, 
Molly Rachel aged 92. Wldo« 
of tlM lata fi wm i i nAT TJ If. 
Ashby, KN. OBH. FtunS 
took place on Monday 
Fe br u ary 9th 1998. She Will 
be gtadr mfeeed. 

BARCLAY-Jake of Baxwonby, 
Devon. Suddenly fa Thailand 
on 16th January 1998. 
Cremation took place in 
Bangkok. Thanksgiving 
gathering to be noanoad 
In to i Bortfl f wra If rfflgfal(L 

io ta* wobm vnu utm fuml 

BARTLETT - Irena Theodora 
died 7th February 1998 
after a short hot cruel 
mimes courageously bm*- 
Only daughter at the lato 
Et auUngtuu Arthur Bartlett 
and time BoMmam Bletorof 
the tare Basil and David. 
B e lo ved (dad of Mic h ae l 

and H wi nat Bar Ufa 

■was u IrwptosTi on. To too* 

her was to fat* hen Funeral 

arrangements to be 


BChawt AUtr, tear 
Miaiiui on 5th Mnar y 
aged 97 peacefully after a 

short HZnesa. Much fared 

father of Michael and 

grandfather of Caroline, 

Kate mid Bir hard Funeral at 

the Church of St John 

Unfawlcfc Owen « 12 neem 

on Tuettfay Fahr umy 17th. 

E aq ulil ee to AJL White ft 
Son Ufa tefc Ol18 95736Sa 



Anniversaries 

today - 

BIRTHS: Benjamin Smfth Barttm. 
naturalist, Lancaster, F tJladrf - 
phia, 1766; Qrarles Lamb, essayist. 
London, 1775; Samod PfimstdL 
inventor of, foe FlimsoU line far 
ships, Brbttol,. K24; Wffliam 
Pember Reeves, statesman. Lytde-: 
ton. New Zealand. 1857; Boris 
Paaemak, poet and novelist. Mos¬ 
cow. 1890: WX TSktafa. tennis 
champion, Ruladeiptiu, 1893;: 
Harold Macmillan. Isf^Eari of 
Stodclan. Frime Mbuster 195763, 
London. 1894. Bertolt Brecht, 
dramatist and theatre director. 
Augsburg, Germany. 1898: Joyce 
GienfdL actress and broadcaster, 
tfindm . 1910. 

DEATHS: Sir Wiffiara Dugdafe;, 
Garter King of Antis 1677-86, Btyfo 
HdL Warwickshire. 1686; Charles 
Louis de Sccondat, Baron de 
Mantesqcdeu. philosopher, Paris. 
1755; Alexander PosMdn, writer, 
1837; Samod Prout. waccrcoT 
ourisL GanberweS. 1852; David 
-ThompscBL explorer; Longwufl, 
Quebec, H57; Fhmrar.-DB^xyL' 
painter. Exmouth, : 1861;- David 
Brewster, philosopher, Aflerby. 
Melrose. 1868; Josqib <Lfater v 1st. 
Baron lister, surgeon and pkxoeer. 
of antiseptic surgery. Wafcner. 
-Knot. 1912: WiBidm Konrad, yon 
R&ageru discoverer cf X-rays. 
^Nobd laureate L90L Mumcfi, M23f 
AduBe Ratti, Pope Flos XIM5Z289, 
Rome, 1939 :’-'Hugh MopCagoe 
Trendiaid, 1 st- Viscount Tren- 
<hard,- Marshal ot .lte- RAF. 
Commisfflotier t^theMeteopditan 
Police 1931-35.1956. 

The nnxriage <rf Queen Vartona to 
Prince Albert of SaxeGobeCg- 
Godu,»ia 

The ase af the revised versioa of 
foe. Bible was aufoorised .by foe 
Church of England. 1889. - 
New Delhi became foe capital of 
India. 1931. 

Pay-as-you-earn (PAYE) system of 
income tax was introduced, 1944 



T A 
'.Tt- • 

.-It*'", ‘-raft 


SkSStr. Za the ^Mb 
Long, and Frances, cta^net of. 
Mrs Rosemary wafiams. cf 
J Kms worth. Hampshsre. and 
fare Rev Joh&StM. WUhano, * 

Mr MAX. Maerr 
and MiasEA, HaB 

engagetnem e announced 
t Mkhad, sot of Mr 
Marr and Mrs JaoquefeK 
•nwbin. of London, and Sana, 
dmghter cf Dr -and ' Mrr 
Christopher HaB. of Adelaide, 
Aastralia:' 

MVJW.Mffls 

and Miss NJ.Gotdm-Orr 

gagetrienr is annuuneed - 
James, son of Mr and Mrs 
MiDs. cf. WdfinrfwroudL 
{vtorfoampaa^tue. ado Nicola. 
rt- i i i pitfFi of Mr and Mis Rkfoacd . 
- ■' Orr, of Edinburgh, and 
Cayman, , British West 

Mr L90JC Spooner 
and MS* CX Cobb 
The. enkagmtent is announced- 
betweOT*Jxi^L son of Mr JohPi 
Spooner \ftnd. .Mrs . Margaret: 
Spooner, bctffr of Ycsk, and . 
Catharine, daodteer of Major and 
Mrs. Bryan .Cobb, of Sammgton. 
NorfoYorisdnwL-' 
MrCLE.Y.W*ora 


m 


j. 

■r 


• „ T- 1- 


kod Miss 
-The 
between 

and Met. 
Gornwafl^s 
of the fate 
and of Mrs 
Kansas. 


tf is announced 
,-Only son of Mr 
iVwors.tjfSlTudy. 



Marrfege J 

MrMJW feCNbcr- 

Ttemsri^ct^j^aceirriUjiitkm 

on Pei^my, *1.1998, between 
Mark Gfiver and Nichobt 





Joseph 
Surrey. 'Wl'. 
BjajiSfl&iniLr 

LadyMark.ufJ 
estate vateaiari 
BtaOH 
SfpfctfSkooe,'; 
estate rahietiktl 
Diaaa. Mary 


Pao. of Esher. 
' valued at 


Surrey, left 
‘ net. 

of Aston-by- 
Jdr 

1.499,09 net 
ft fen a t of 

Oxfordshire, 


teljtRTA- 
•nrJrr wh/ 
•rirrurf 
■Brr.-h 
iliiatun x 
iwihoro 

«:vwc: 



TRm&mil 4811982 
FAX: 01714819313 


DEATHS 


BROOK - Carolina Cw*« 
Orirnom) « Myton Holloa, 
Warwick on 4th Totowry 
asftA 38. A puzfact wtfa to 
Boh and a w u n tfat f u l rnothar 
to 


Of 

Aroa Tti nr*dar 12th 
Fatoumy 2 fau. Ffoum. Or 
t tonurton i to teyton Hoapici, 
c/o A BraMtt, 34 Shoop 
Strou t. Stratford-on-Avon 
CV37 6SE. 


DARKE - On 6th Fobruary 
1998 at his homo In 
C mhMm. Botat Seymour 
Garland, aged 78, tuond 
buetonod of Qhe, father of 
Sttpita, Caroline and 
Andrew, son of the late 
HaroM «■»< Qmv The 

faaeml service wCl he Mid 
In the Ond af Downing 
Collage Cambridge on fttdey 
13th Be fa—i y at 1X46 hl 
ttamUr flowers <miy p lea s a 
h untin iK Cor Our Dowalaa 
College Student Hardship 
Appeal say be sent c/o 
Harry WUltam* ft Sons, 
ftiimra l n ti B ftn ra 7 Vtetada 

Aut, OUBfaUM CB4 3BJ 
CM 01223 ^MBOX 


do WIT - Hugh died 
unexpectedly on Tuesday 
3rd te aua ry 1998. Fortner 
f*«u» correspondent with 
this newspaper, public 
dufai coamlBut. srHsr 
and writer. He Is pntufeUy 
mtaed hr ChatUe, Adzlas, 
Lorraine and Ms many 
Mends. Service at Christ 

Ouncfc. s^talfishta an 16 th 

February at 1 fafa followed 
by prtene bnfaL Donations 
it desired to the Cat 
Protection League Tel: 
01403 222900. 


QUMOOdD-OB February 7th 
peacefully at The Coach 
House nursing Home, 
Shannr. Stpan, after s long 
illness aged 88 yuort , 
C mwtaii c w Fahnu Etifagfald, 
much knud sfetur of Aura 
Ada. Dear Godmother of 
Fanny and friend of Jo 
Todoor Hart, David and 
Mnuraon. Service end 
cremation at Stonofall 

f’ww.taTfcnn HinmglWs, K. 
Yorks, on Thursday 
February I2tfa at 940 am. 


QLOVQI - Ernest, husband cf 
tba fato Sorts Jfazjcrtei, cm 
7th February aged 91. 
Funeral at St Andraus. Weat 
Btaby, Bhal on Thnaduy 
12th February at 1 pm. 
faw nM Benin at Christ 
Chmch, Totland. Isle of 
Wight oc Saturday 4tfc April 
at za) pm. Donstfans to tel 
Mounthatteu Hospice. 
HBllbunT lane, Newport. 
SOW, FOOT ZEE- 


90 


HAMM US LEY - Frederica 
Georgina Mary died very 
peacefully at home on 
February 5th 

An fad o tn lti 
graatty mis s ed by her sane 
and their wives, 
grandchildren and gnat- 
grandchildren and many 
friends. Baq n le m Mass St. 
Valentine's Dsy. 12J30 at St 
Saviours Church. Totland 
Bay. No flowers but 
d wiatl o n s to UN. Drtstag 
for the Disabled c/o 
Twymaas Funeral Service, 
Avenue Xoad. Freshwater, 
Isle uCWMtF040 9DD Teh 
(01983) 752369. 

■CKMBACH - Mask wntiam, 
on February 7th 
at heme after 
and valiant 
battle ” with cancer, 
surrounded by those he 
loved. Best friend and 
hahmed hus b and of Coda, 
adored father of the lato 
ta i dtaii and Andrea, Lucy 
and Ftsddfauen of fas lato 
William Whitehead and 
Diana Hlcks-Beach and 
brother of Elizabeth and 


ke place at St Mary’s 
arch. Great Wltcombe, 
"Ira, 


14th February ax 2 pm. 
Enquiries and flowers to 
Selim Smith ft Co-, 74 


tab 

HOME-maa - John, died 
peacefully at St John’s 
on 6th February 
75 yeaxs. Marti 


loved father cf Jennifer Bon. 
Funeral a t lfo rt lake 
Crantortua at 12 noun on 
12th Febraary. Doaa rf ons to 
RSM. 

KJNT-Nancy, on February 8th 
1998 aftar a short nhwsa. 
aged 81 yams, baza fa Eads 
Colne, Eiiier. end fsstosd| cf 
Hlghgate Service will he 
hold In West Herts 
Crematorium. Garston on 
Friday February 13th at 
limn. Ah eamrides to CL 
Nethereo« ft Son, 150 
Dukes Lane. Tottsra Suz. 
HeA.EN6 lAF.Tet (01707) 
652288. 

JOHNSON - -Johnny" Bull 
TyiUlo of Fax East and 
Chal-rlngtoa. Beloved 
hirttani of the Jute StoOfa 
father to Ffapa aaf 
and grandCathur to 
and Fra&Sa. died 
and peacefully aged 
yearn w 23*d 1998. 

UMOOMOBIM - Ofa SfaTtarid 
Bl BN died p eace fu lly at 
Queen Alexandra Houghs!. 
Portsmouth oa Sunday 
February 8th 1998 aged 85L 
Demy loved husband of 
Brim azd father of DiflbT- 
Crotuatlou private. 
Ikahtfvhg S e t v he at St 
ataxy's Church, Hayllng 
bland - date to be 


MAXFia - Dorothy Mary, 
widow of WUmot Dixon 
Longs tart and Charles 
Bochfort Maxsted, much 


and* great-grandmother. 

Pimara l w AH SkIUCS Qw\ 

Brantlagham on Friday 
Fehiuaii 13th at 12 noon. 
Family flowers only. 
Donations if desired to 
Tteloar Tru st, F royla. AXtrrn. 
Hamprtilie GD34 4JX. 


_ __ 

on Fefaruary'6th 1998 la 
hospftaL Funeral Service to 
be held at St GDas Qnxrtfa, 
Met cht n g do a . Ox f ords hire 
on Friday 13th February 
1998 at 2 pm followed by 
Interment. Donations to 
Sobett House. AH emfatas 
and donations to S ft B 
Childs tab 01866 427272. 


SB* Farcy Sx, C3CQ, 

s 2L 1 S5£? t 8£ 



Lf. 


ttmi Thursday 
12th February at St Geot»ek 
Church, Sin gapore. 

mTlrnn* to 
The WDdfowl and Wtttoads 
Trust, SWmhrirtga, Caca,QL2 
7BT. 


MURRAY • Betty OUfJL) 
peacefully at Fendean 
Nuzring Heart on Friday dth 
February 1998. FemBy end 
close friends service at 
Hsyshort PC, on 
12th February. 

Service to be 
Chtrhesiar at a hut tea 
Family flowers only. 
Donation* to St Ja 
Church. Heyshocc ch 
Xintott A Sen, North 
MMhuxst, Sussex. 


IMtoT OH - On F vbcc s ry M 
peacefully at Torbay 

Hospbal Ebfa agM91 wa 

formerly Of Leak, 
Staffordshire, wife of the 
late Sir Hubert Newton, 
raodrar of SUsabuth, tear 
of AanatMl. 
and Jonathan graar- 

___ of James. Um 

funexai service will take 
place at Enter and Devon 
Crematorium on Friday 
F e b r uar y 13th at-230 ran. 
Family flower* only but 
aorarinos If tehed to St 
Edward's Parish Church 
Leak rib F. 

Son. Bridge Bouse, 9 

.«« Lana. 

TQ13 7ZO. 


MWTON - Laeoaod Stanley, 
QBE, BSc. MBd, Hon FOOL On 
FrtfayjMh Ibfauray 1998, 
aged 82 ye ars , p eace f u lly fa 
hosp ita l. Devoted husband 
of Angela for over S8 yearn 
Much loved father Of 
Christopher, Ni c hol a s and 
Johan- Grand father of five, 
and great-grandfather of 
two. So sadly Hilroarf 'lerilni 
at the Chiltexas 

r ^n u m tu n f M i^ ^ pfirajinRi, fjw 

Monday 16th T e b r un ry at 
1130 tSL Family flowers 
only. Dp n e ri o o s to 





Master at 

School, died 

’ cm 5th Fetouary, 
1998 aged 87 years. Beloved 
husband of the Into Dorothy, 
• deariy loved father, 
grandfather and 
grandfather. 



FOWBJ. - The D Hon. J. Enoch 
Powell, MBA, on 8th 
February; peacCTuDy fa Us 
86th yen^ batoned husband 
of Faa and much loved 
father of Sasun and Jauntier 
B3ftd itf Wumhi 

Baehel, Julia and James. 
Funeral Service on 
W i ihiesday 18th Fe fa n a ty at 
St Margarat'a Chuxch, 
Wescufastar Abbey at 11 am 
followed by a sew t ee at St 
Maty's Cneh, Warwick at 
230pm(whhttainibt» i i 
of the loyal Bagtmant of 
fwiHiitX Thom immune 
to be pies m n at the . fa iia i s T 
at St .Ibigunt Church, 
Westminster Abbey, an 
NOMfMd to notify is 
writing The . hector's 
Sa c re tai l . Boom 18,1 little 
Ondatra; WumifnirTar Abbey, 
London, SWlF 8FL so fa* 
appropriate seating 
tegrams on bs mari a 
Transport from St 
MaxgKStta to E fanv irtt wffl 
ho available for those 

wishing to attend both 

services- Please 


212 Eveoholx 

.MWllBD.No 

_ ustf 

deaired to Th* Eoyal 
Warwicksblro Eogtmnntul 
Museum Appeal. St JobrA 
Sanaa, nirid; 09* 4NF 
os to The Eoyal British 
logon. 48ran Ban,London. 

SW1T 5JT. No memorial 
eexvlce will be held. 


OUM-TE.Arthdeucan.EAF. 

CBet*d). to, 6th February 

1998 mi hoM»». Tom, beloved 

bustmadoC Baton, father of 

Ort»Hnw,Detadru and FUttle^ 


and Nejm. Private 

Monday 16th February; 

thanksgfring service at a 

date to be amungsd. Ftoaee, 

no fln u ms but d ona fa rae . if 

desired, for cha riti e s of 

Tcrii e hoo a to g c/o P. Curtis 
ft .Son, Undertakers, 11 
“ WBfa. 


NKAD - Eoglnald Arthur. 
P m eufa ny qUjpfa rabruary 


12 th February at Wear 
Wiltshire Crematorium. 

i at 2 pr. Bel o v e d 



rib F. Cuztta ft 
Son, 11 Partway, 
Warminster, Writs. BA12 

8QC. 


• Broca 


proud grandfather of 
MadwOtm -fflnlM Sad 
Angelica. The funeral mass 
mtU take place at. the 
Brompton ■ Oratory, 
Knlohtrbridge, London, 
to m orrow at 11 am. Btufal 
will take place at family 
tomb fa Dwuonft; Cboaxfa. 


8ANDBL-David 
8th Befanui 
98th year. 

Surgeon at tkiEUtoml 
Temperance Hospital, 
husband of Jessie, father of 
Jenifer and- XoBerr, 
‘ Mr of Adam anti 
Funeral'private.. 


MBUnaaia mwAT - 
F rtm go fa edtod p eec efgD yat 


talk 


5th, fa hm 81 st year. Private 


on February let. 

rad mother; at her. fab a 

simple funeral and no l 


HmM-VfanJHfaorMft 
Michael’s ‘ Hospice, 
TlaiiWM a le «b 7th February 
agBdftLHtfbamratafcUiE 

father of julfarz, GahrieOe 

rad Obriotm. Ogsafanb 
St Mtohmon Hesplcwdf 



Febnmry 5th 
la, widow of 
Motley Shelftnd. 
service at 8t 
Wrot Hoeshly osn 
13th at 3 pm. 
Ballard and 


WALSH Paul Joseph. 
- Chairman of Thouycxoft 
Obiafaertonsry^Lfateti, <Bad 


Hospital, Q nra Srazuyi 
aftar. ft. long Ubmea. Berady 
bdoud MMri tffirad 

krwtag father of 



w—=7 

MTVlot Ml St -4MI!fv> 

Church,t. ear .Drake, ^08SA 
Rpnoufh at 3J^ put-family 
Tluweia only- pj e ans . 



















































































WA ’^"%|toErruMiES 

mm-.' ■ r- : —- 

•fe4p&2;-: ■' * 'fuS' . ' 





-V.Ik .•‘T*!’!- - 

Mf n - t \ .■ 

■;'■ :. , 

Vr^c: 

’■-Mr. ^: 

JE" I. 

••■ i!, ^v 

Vj ■ 

* . " -»7W ^ ' Wt 


CARL WILSON 


fteBeu^ Bots; died in- 
Los Angeles of cameras 
Fdnnary6aged 
SLHe was bom on 
Decdnber2L1946: - 


*'■'■■* lita k youngest of tee 

■.r-’55?> I ; "Singing brothers, Carl 

'**1^! ‘ I Vtflsan. like his sib- 
Vj .,!.■;>'«.(? A lings Brian and Den- 
, . 5 jr.j . . no, wiB: forever be ramem- ; 

bened as » goklen you* in 
•v-H JJk- candy-striped shirt with • a 
V ^ surfboard under his arm. The 

a _ ',y v ( inddiWe frnage* dating back 

* Mh, l.uL I Aire than 30 .years to-the 
-•. ■* *w i beeves of the-earforBeadiBqys 
- - ., 1 records, sometimes frustrated 

a*iL him, yet it is testimony not 
.•• <ssO to the «ma6rdinaiy po- 
. -. ' j 1 tetKyoftegJT^'Simndcbut 
_ ^ -J 50 the mytffic'Tfower of the ■ 

M - j « A " v.- Californian. dream of sun and.. 

^ winch tirey came to 


• ,JS rep^ 5 * 311 - 

* ••- Despite 


an. attenqpt 




v - 'Ml 

i>ki M P ... . 


Vl*^ launrh a soto career m the 
•" ■«•«£**$ 1980s, Olsons life refrained 
ine^cabfyKnbsdtotfaeband 
; -""‘Vt ,;7£ -.he aid - his brothers had 
.‘V ^ formed ih 1961. Afthough 
, ’ brother Dennis drowned m 

l ' 1 .'.T,' , °* L w 1^83 and Brian, became in- 
:“v,,rtij^ creasingly reclusive, Carl con- 
tinued to perforin with the 
'^n/.jnup and completed the 
, ^ Vm^Peadi Boys’ 36th annual tour 
...'. • f j cm America, only last summer. 
~--c Brian Wilson was the sao g- 

• ?*■*: writing genius behind the 
>. \ \ y. Beach Ifo^butCari possessed 

*jmrs vJS. the strangest voice, singing 
- v ,1-^ lead on many of their greatest 
■ songs such as God Only 

r- -.v^ Knows asid Good Vibrations. 
His death leaves Brian, the 
•i e± eldest and on the surface the 
most fragile of the brothers. as 
the sole survivor. 

l|., •„ Raised in Hawthorne, - a 
I drnagt suburb of Los Angeles about 
; v :■%<*, five miles froni the .Pacific. 

* v at*. Ocearv the three'WQsoti broth- 

:„ r _. ere were inspired by the dose-, 
harmony vocals of groups 
■ - c. such as the Four Freshmen. 
Inviting their cousin Mike 

_ Ijoveandahighsthoolfrienid, 

'*81 Jardine. to form a sin^ng 
quartet, they appeared initial- 
JsCsim ly as Carl and the Passions,, 
playing rented instruments 
-s and with Cart an guitar. . 

Although Dennis was the 
’ only genuine surfcr. they were 



. The Beach Bqys with two female fans in London in 1966. Carl Wilson is second right 


Mama® 

■i 

irs. \ 


i ale s? uifis 


fascinated by the. mystique of 
the surfing subculture that 
had developed cm the beaches 
around Malibu. They wrote a 
song called Suifm\ madetheir 
first appearance as the Beach 
Bqys at Long Beach on New 
Year's Eve 1961 and never, 
looked bade 

Suifin' was only a minor hit 
but it was followed by Suifiii’ 
Safari and die anthem Surfin' 
USA, which reached number 
two in the American charts in 
July 1963 and showed off the 
rich, layered harmonies that 
were to become die B«irh 
Boys’trademark. Other songs 
such as .little Deuce Coupe 
and Fun Fun Fun. developed a . 
second celebratory theme of 
driving die California high¬ 
ways in hot rods and open- 
topped cars* 

What all the songs-had in 
common was a bouncy hedo¬ 
nism which reflected a world 
of eternal youth, endless sun¬ 


shine and leisured affluence in 
which there was always a 
plentiful supply of beautiful 
girls, invanaUy blonde, 
tanned and fun-loving. One 
early hit premised ‘two girls 
for every boy" and in a land 
where the Depression and the 
Second World War were still 
Hving memories, the cares of 
adulthood were never allowed 
to intrude. - 

To British youth such escap¬ 
ism seemed incredibly exotic 
and at the height of the 
invaskm of die American 
charts by groups such as the 
Beaties arid the Rolling 
Stones, the Beach Bqys re¬ 
dressed the balance fry scoring 
huge British hits with songs 
such as / Get Around aim 
California Girls. 

Inevitably the band’s mem¬ 
bers began to outgrow the teen 
dreams and 

of their early songs. Influenced 
by the lavish production tech¬ 


niques of Phil Specter and die 
more experimental approach 
of the Beatles' Rubber Soul, in 
May 1966 the Beach Bays 
released what many regarded 
as their finest achievement, 
the Per Sounds album, which 
used elaborate studio Tech¬ 
niques to produce an almost 
symphonic approach. It was 
followed by Good Vibrations. 
which still regularly tops 
polls as the grea test single of 
all time. 

By tile late 1960s Vietnam 
and progr e s siv e rode had 
made the Beach Bqys seem 
tike an anachronism. Band 
members became heavily in¬ 
volved in drug abuse and Carl 
had other problems. In Janu¬ 
ary 1967 he resisted being 
drafted to fight in Vietnam, 
dahning to be a conscientious 
objector and refusing to take 
the oath of allegiance: He was 
arrested by the FBI and spent 
five days in jafi. Assigned to 


COLONEL BILL COOK 


alternative civilian dure at Los 
Angeles Veterans’ Hospital, he 
again refused, on the ground 
that that the job would not 
make use erf his talents. 

When they were arraigned 
for trial, the case forced the 
Beadi Boys to pull out of the 
now legendary Monterey Pop 
Festival. Cart was acquitted of 
draft evasion but the case 
dragged an. Two years later he 
was arraigned for falling to 
appear for community service 
work in the hospital. Eventual¬ 
ly a compromise was reached 
which required the Beach 
Boys to play free concert s in 
hospitals and prisons. 

Ironically, Carl’s anti-war 
stance had given the Beach 
Bqys a newfound credibility. 
During the 1970s they jammed 
with the Grateful Dead, 
played a huge anti-war rally in 
Washington and released the 
environmentally concerned al¬ 
bum Surfs Up. which also 
marked Carl’s growing matu¬ 
rity as a songwriter. He also 
stretched his wings by appear¬ 
ing with other artists and sang 
on Elton John's Don't Let the 
Sun go down on Me. 

By 1981 Carl had left the 
fold, frustrated by the group’s 
reliance on nostalgia. He at¬ 
tempted to establish a solo 
career, but after a poor-selling 
album he was back within a 
year. There has been only one 
album of newly recorded 
Beach Boys material in the 
past 15 years, yet Carl, occa¬ 
sionally joined by Brian, con¬ 
tinued to tour with the group 
until his death, despite the 
fraternal goodwill being dis¬ 
turbed by Brian's autobiogra¬ 
phy, which portrayed Cari as 
an alcoholic and drug addict 
and ted to threats of legal 
action. 

If Carl Wilson felt a slave to 
his youthful post, he appeared 
to have found a way of living 
with it Despite undergoing 
chemotherapy in April' last 
year, he was back on the road 
within weeks to complete his 
last Beach Bqys’tour. 

He is survived by his broth¬ 
er Brian, his second wife Gina 
(the daughter of Dean Martini 
and two sons from his first 
marriage. 


Colonel F. W. (BiD) Cook. 

MC.MBE, King’s Own 

Yorkshire Light Infantry, 

died on January 23 aged 
79. Hewas bora on 
January 18.1919. 

AFTER a wartime career in 
which he was so severely 
wounded that it seemed likely 
he would never serve again. 
Bill Cook recovered to take 
pan in many of the brushfire 
campaigns of the postwar 
period, in addition, he has his 
niche in die history of the 
peacetime British Army for 
the energy and initiative he 
applied to the setting up of the 
battle group training area at 
Suffic’d in Canada. Since the 
loss of such training areas in 
the Middle East and in 
Germany, this facility, in the 
wide open spaces of Alberta, 
has become vital to the Army 
for the exercising of artillery 
and armour. Cook kept up 
relentless pressure to make 
sure it was established on a 
sound footing. 

Frank Wilkinson Cook (the 
origins of his universally used 
nickname are not dear) was 
the posthumous son of Frank 
£adon Cook who had himself 
been awarded the MC during 
the First World War. Born into 
the world of Yorkshire mill- 
owners and lawyers, he had 
bur one desire — ro pursue an 
Army career. After Giggles- 
wtek School, however, he was 
articled to a solicitor but seized 
his opportunity when war 
broke out in 1939 and prompt¬ 
ly enlisted. He was soon 
commissioned into the King's 
Own Yorkshire Light Infantry 
(KOYUJ. 

His unit was sent out ro 
France with the BEF .after 
which he saw service in North 
Africa. As the Allies closed in 
an Axis forces with their backs 
to Tunis and the sea, in the 
final weeks of the campaign. 
Cook won his MC on April 22. 
1943, when he led attacks with 
fixed bayonet and grenades on 
a series of German machine- 
gun nests which were holding 
up the British advance. In 
September that year, after the 
invasion of Italy, he took part 
in the fiercely contested land¬ 
ings at Salerno, and during 



tills campaign, was severely 
wounded. 

He was invalided home ro 
England, paralysed from the 
waist down, with no expecta¬ 
tion on the pan of the authori¬ 
ties that he would even walk, 
much less serve, again. Plans 
were made to buy him a farm 
so that he could still pursue an 
outdoor life, but no ont£.had 
reckoned with Cook's tem¬ 
perament. When told by the 
surgeon that he would proba¬ 
bly never walk again, his reply 
was “f will!” — and he dia. 
Furthermore, sheer will-pow¬ 
er eventually enabled him to 
return to active service in 
theatres ranging from the 
rainforests of the Tropics to 
tite high plains of North 
America. 

Thereafter he participated 
in many of the campaigns in 
which the British Army partic¬ 
ipated in the run-up to mili¬ 
tary withdrawal from many 
colonial possessions. Cook 
was in Malaya during the 
emergency and (after spells ar 
SHAPE as military assistant 
tn Montgomery’s Chief of 
Staff, and at the Joint Services 
Staff College) with his battal¬ 
ion in Kenya in the latter 
stages of the campaign against 
the Mau Mau. He was next 


sent to Cyprus with 45 Com¬ 
mando during the Eoka insur¬ 
rection, for which he was 
appointed MBE. 

After serving as Brigade 
Major with the 5th Infantry 
Brigade in the British Army of 
the Rhine, be was sent io 
command bth King's African 
Rifles in Tanganyika and then 
served as garrison command¬ 
er in British Honduras. His 
final posting was at the Minis¬ 
try of Defence, where he 
supervised the establishment 
of the Canadian banle group 
Training area in the J960s. 

Several years previously. 
KOYL1 had become 2nd Bat¬ 
talion. Light Infantry Brigade 
and on retirement Cook was 
appointed Deputy Colonel 
(Yorkshire). He followed this 
with a period as regimental 
secretary and was instrumen¬ 
tal in reorganising the regi¬ 
mental museum at PomefracL 
Thus, he served his regiment 
almost to the end of his life. 

Bill Ctook hated fuss and 
frills and one always knew 
exactly where one stood with 
him. But no man was more 
loyal to his causes and no 
friend more true. 

He married Eddie 
Braithwaite in 1948. She and 
their son survive him. 


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HALLDOR LAXNESS 


‘ HaBdor Durness. - r 
lcc&nficwriter who wwl • 
tire Nobd Prize for; 
l itera tu r e in M55. 
died on February Saged 
96. He was bora on 
April 23,1902. 

BY EAR the best4mown Ice¬ 
landic writer erf. ihe-century, 
Halldor Laxness-might well 
have won The NobeT Prize for 
tttentturc sooner, than he did, 
ftari ft not been forthe Swedish 
Academy's inhibition about 
awanfihg'it foa-redpent of 
the Stalin Prize. Certainly his 


bestworic ionig predated. 1955, 

• tffe year in which he became a 

• Nobd laureate. Hewas widely 
fravefled and had absorbed 

■; influences as various as Ger- 
' man Expressionism. Roman 
Catbdkdsm. French Surreal¬ 
ism and American naturalism 
(and socialist Utopianism) — 
before arriving at a species trf 
humanis tic Tgoas m. 

He had 7 also had'a long 
period as a convinced commu¬ 
nist though no one locked 
askance at this in Iceland, 
where the party has a history 
' of representation in Parlia¬ 


ment Allied to a natural 

anodand’s framing and^i- 
ing communities, communism 
made him an eloquent social 
novelist 

HaBdor KiJjan Gudjonsson 
was born in Reykjavik, of 
prosperous parents. He took 
his pen-name. Laxness, from 
the name of his fethert inland 
valley farm. He was educated 
at tiie Icelandic Latin School 
and attended one term at 
Reykjavik Gymnasium before 
embarking on a series of 
travels throughout Scandina¬ 


via. He had published his first 
novel. Bam Natturvnnar (*A 
Child of Nature"), at the age 
of 17. 

His life was foil of sudden 
shifts of view and impulsive 
changes of mind. After wan¬ 
dering about Europe and 
working for a Copenhagen 
newspaper, he settled down 
for a year in 1923 in a 
Benedictine monastery in Lux¬ 
embourg. Here he wrote the 
novel Undir Heleahnuk f*AI 
the Holy Mountain", 1924). At 
this monastery. St Maurice de 
Clervaux. he led a fife erf 


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religious devotion and medita¬ 
tion, and in 1923 he was 
received into the Roman Cath¬ 
olic Church. In 1924 he taught 
at the Jesuit-run school, 
Champion House, in Osteriey, 
Middlesex. 

In the later 1920s, in Sicily, 
he worked on the novel Vefa- 
rinn mikli fra Kasmir ("The 
Great Weaver from Kashmir", 
1927). This is a memorable 
fictional account of his own 
struggle between religious as¬ 
ceticism and worldly plea¬ 
sures. By tiie time he had 
completed the book, produced 
in a mood in which he felt 
that "the fundamental princi¬ 
ples of Christianity and those 
of human life” were “in¬ 
compatible", he had re¬ 
nounced his Catholicism. The 
influence of Strindberg was 
evident in this novel Its publi¬ 
cation caused a furore. 

He spent the years 1927-29 
in America, where he 
changed his views still more 
sharply, partly as a result of 
meeting the socialist Utopian 
novelist Upton Sinclair. He 
gave an account of tins change 
of heart in his autobiography, 
Skaldmimi f Poet's Tune", 
1963). 

He had, meanwhile, been 
reading voraciously, not only 
in tiie naturalistic works of 
such American writers as 
Dreiser and Sinclair himself, 
but also in European Surreal¬ 
ism, His single volume of 
verse, which appeared in 1930, 
reflected this influence. 

A series of socialistic essays 
were collected in Alpydubokin 
(“Book of Plain People", 1929). 
The novels which made hi 
name are explorations and 
examinations of every aspect 
of Icelandic life: before 1944, 
and the formation of the 
independent Icelandic Repub¬ 
lic, they were, like his essays. 






&.:• £ -j&J 

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strongly nationalistic in tone. 

The two novels translated 
into English in 1934 as Satka 
Valka describe a small fishing 
village in which the labour 
movement pits its new-found 
strength against capitalist 
merchants and fishing mag¬ 
nates. Sjalfstaett folk (1934- 
35), translated as Independent 
People 0945). is his first major 
novel. It is the study of an 
obstinate farmer against the 
background of what Laxness 
regarded as the feudal condi¬ 
tion of the peasantry in 
Ireland. 

Laxness was by now a hero 
of the Left and a bite noire of 
the conservative press. But he 
now called himself “a leftist 
sorialisT, not a communist. 
His massive tetralogy Heim - 
sljos (1937-40), about a flawed 
but vi tali Stic folk poet called 
Olafor Karason. made him no 


more popular with the Right, 
who disapproved of his pro¬ 
tagonist’s rough behaviour. 
The whole of this work ap¬ 
peared in English as World 
Light (1969). 

The question of Icelandic 
independence now became a 
bunting issue. (When the Na¬ 
zis had overrun Denmark in 
1940, British troops occupied 
Iceland, until then a more or 
less autonomous Danish de¬ 
pendency.) Laxness now 
turned to the historical novel. 
The 1940s trilogy republished 
in 1957 as Islandslukkan (/op- 
land's Sell) is the story of an 
18th-century Icelander in con¬ 
flict with a repressive govern¬ 
ment ar home and badly 
intentioned foreign powers 
abroad; its contemporary 
implications were obvious. 

Atomstodin (1948), translat¬ 
ed as The Atom Station , is a 


protest against the Icelandic 
Government's action in allow¬ 
ing the Americans military 
facilities. Gerpln (1952) trans¬ 
lated as 7fte Happy Warriors 
(1958) is a satirical a ttack on all 
dictators — whether of right 
or left. 

After Laxness had received 
the Nobel Prize he toured 
America, India. China and a 
number of other countries. 
After that, however, he moved 
away from social criticism and 
politics to a more philosophi¬ 
cal attitude. Brekkukotsannat 
(1957), translated in 19o6 as 
The Fish Can Sing, preaches, 
a title ruefully, the lesson that 
the artist must never become 
embroiled in political dogma. 
The Taoist influence of avoid¬ 
ance of aggression becomes 
apparent for the first rime. 

Laxness’s Brechtian play 
Dufnaveislan (1966) of which 
there is an English version 
called The Pigeon Banquet. 
was no more successful than 
his other excursions into dra¬ 
ma. In A Rhyme of God's Gift 
(1972). Laxness indulged his 
Taoism, lapsing into what his 
critics considered "a mildly 
conservative cast of mind". 

Laxness owed an enormous 
debt to his compatriot, the 
writer and Esperanto enthusi¬ 
ast Thorbergur Thortharson 
(1889-1975). but nonetheless de¬ 
served his international emi¬ 
nence as a writer of sinewy 
power and humane convic¬ 
tions. He translated many 
works into Icelandic, includ¬ 
ing Voltaire’s Candide. which 
exercised a strong influence on 
his later work. 

Laxness was twice married, 
first in 1930 to lngibjorg Ein- 
arsdottir, by whom he had one 
son, and secondly to Andur 
Svensdottir. She, their two 
daughters and the son of his 
first marriage, survive him. 


A SUFFRAGIST MATINEE ON THIS DAY 


Both on and off the stage, starting 
with the topical prologue spoken by 
Miss Eva Moore with due sarcasm, 
there was a spirit of hopeful resolve at 
the matin&e given yesterday by the 
Women Writers’ Suffrage League. 
When Mr. Courrice Pounds sang “Sigh 
no more, ladies." and reminded them 
dial “Men were deceivers ever”; when 
Miss Cicely Hamilton, a right queenly 
Lady Macbeth, cried scornfully, “We 
fail! But screw your courage to the 
sticking place, and well not fail"; when 
Miss Lena Ashweli gave Miss Marion 
Terry rosemary for remembrance, and 
when Miss Terry's beautiful Terry voice 
rang out the truth that “earthly power 
doth then show likest God's, when 
mercy seasons justice,’’ audience and 
performers were as one in feeling the 
aptness of each brief quotation to 
varying phrases of their common object, 
"I should be sick." said Imogen, “but 
that ray resolution helps me" — and the 
lines no doubt went home to most of 


February 10,1912 


In contrast to some notorious activities this 
suffragette redial ms mild , too mild, 
perhaps, to have included Congreve's lines: 

Hecpf it has no rage, like love to hatred 
turn'd. 

Nor Hell a fury, like a woman scorn’d. 

these who were present. That was in 
Shakespeartfs Dream, a'graceful har¬ 
mony in heroines arranged by Miss 
Beatrice Harraden and Miss Bessie 
Hanon, in which most of the heroines, 
triumphant and otherwise, from the 
boytike Viola of Mrs Uslie Carter to tiie 
femina furens of Miss Adeline Bourne's 
Cleopatra, came on one after the other, 
delivered their well-chosen fines, and so 
stood aside. Before that the programme, 
with an artistic touch in the pleasant 
songs and masterly violoncello playing 


of Miss Marta Cunningham and Miss 
May Mukle, was poignantly modem 
and practical. In the Trafalgar-square 
scene from Miss Elizabeth Robins’s 
Voice for Women , Miss Agnes Thomas 
as the working woman speaker, Mr 
Harold Chapin as the Socialist, Miss 
Muriel Matters as Ernestine Blunt, and 
Miss Lillian Braithwaite as Vida Lever¬ 
ing, were all excellent and were well 
supported by the crowd and Mr Mark 
Hannam. The scene is. of course. 
propagandist but ir is particularly true 
to life, and yesterday its realism and its 
meaning were underlined by the faci 
that Mrs Pethick Lawrence and Miss 
Christabd Pankhurst (the actual per¬ 
sonality represented by the Ernestine 
Blunt of the play) were in the stalk, so 
that only the footlights separated the 
drama of the stage from the drama of 
life. In Edith, a new comedy by Miss 
Elizabeth Baker, the author of Chains. 
the fallacy that a man qua man is 
necessarily more competent and clever 
than a woman was lightly made fun of. 
much to the enjoyment of the audience. 









































































































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' THE TIMES TUESDAY FEBR0ARY101998 


YOUR OWN BUSINESS 23 




i® s sor I 



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Widgtf Finn says that even small firms can benefit from part-time directors 
;AllOutsider: nPA#l\rl*r 


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$ IM 


J frstbanks to the money . 

he's made out of; 
fines on late returns!" ;, 


secret of non-execs’ appeal 


COUSINS Design Consultancy, . 
bas^ w Bristol, was established. 
laslytsffandis ambiiiousargrow- 
rapidlrfWidj^ 

Pavdey,tfre commerdaidirector, 
knew jt needed si nonexecutive 

directnr 'who would widm luHi- 
ZDUs aod help the company to 
enter the London market 

“NeW companies tendtobe 
>* lrrwaitHookxng, and easily bogged 

ar down with dajjy rcmtme,-says Mr . 
Pavdey.^'We wanted 'someone 
who understood die indosfry to 
give us Teguhur feedback on how 
we aie doing."- ; " / • . 

Gro-NED’s -shortlist included 
Keith Fowtavlbmtfcr chief etecu- 
tive of RSCG Catalan, who fitted 
the perfectly^ Thr design- 
consultancy is opeiung soon hi 
London with Mr Fowler's be^p.' 

“Hise^ieiieticehejpedonrinar- 
ketmg strategy ."says Mr PaVeky, 
"and-he-has skipped us spbufing 
money tnmeaxsaaly." 

Maoiin^aT«Mgh,direcft«r of 
Mqnotub, a washingmachine 
■ business, daimsthat faanring a non- 
exec with long experience in die 
same business saves/foe company 
v. from making dqiensiveinistakes. 
^ MichadL Hearn. formerly .diair:. 
man of Servis, brings a wealth, of ; 
industry knowledge to the board. 

"He has found us sub-contrac¬ 
tors and other usefdl contacts." 
says Mr Myerscuugh. “Midiad is 
available seven daysa week. He is. 
a fantastic investment and I 
wouldn't have got the business off 
the gronnd without him." 


M any, small businesses 
beSete flat non-executive 
directors are an expensive 
and < interfering irrelevance. The 
Gadbmy, Green bury " and Hempd 
reports focus oa the corporate 
governance rdeof nan-eteamves in 
public companies with responsi¬ 
bility for protecting shareholders’ 
interests, but non-executives have a 
different equaDy yduaWe 

place in small and medium-sized-, 
enterprises. . 

Patrick Dunne, a cBreciorofSi, foe 
investment company, argues that a 
giod non-exec in asroall businessis. 
tike a teddy bear ^Someone; in 
whom you can confide your greatest 
ambitions and worst fears.” 

: N« aUwxwweca tiros are warm 
and cuddly, but they can be a guide 
and mentor, filling the inevitable' 
skills gap in a sn^ organsafion 


howewr small, if its owner is am¬ 
bitious to grow foe business. 

Thereaxe key stages when a non¬ 
executive can make a unique contri¬ 
bution, according to Martin Burcfr- 
atoKf. a partner m Kingston Smith, 
the accountants. He says: "They are 
invaluable when a company needs 
to rase capital and is looking for 
credibility to add to the team dr 
when executives are involved with 
day-today growth and have no time 
to consider the longterm, strategy. 
They can tilsb.bring new ideas or 
solve a particular problem.” 

- Burchmore. whose accountancy 
practice runs Gro-NED, a register 


A guide to help businesses to 
prepare for the single European 
currency has been prepared by 
Wilde Sapte, the Cny law firm, 
and the DIHT. the German 
equivalent of the Confederation 
of British Industry. Copies of 
Euro Planner are available free 
from the Germarr-British Cham¬ 
ber of Industry and Commerce. 16 
Buckingham Gate, London. SW1E 
6LB. Lloyds Bank has also pro¬ 
duced a briefing. Dealing with the 
Euro , to help small businesses to 
understand bow they wfll be 
affected. Copies are free from 
Lloyds brandies. 






Tno in harmony: Tim Neame, left, Patrick Dunne, centre, and Martin Myerscough all recognise the value of non-executive directors 


of ncm-exenitives for small com¬ 
panies. adds that a non-executive 
director is not necessarily a lifelong 
fixture. "A particular hoard member 
might be helpful for a period, but 
when the need changes you should 
consider changing the director, too." 

There is no need to look among 
the ranks of the great and the good 
when selecting a non-executive di¬ 
rector for a small company unless 
they have a particular quality. Nor 
is it necessary to settle for someone 
local or working in the same sector. 
It is more important to have direct 
experience of seeing a small com¬ 
pany grow successfully. In a family 


O This year's Carlton Enterprise 
Fair will be held at the New 
Connaught Rooms, Covent 
Garden. London, on February 13 
and 14. More than 40 exhibitors 
will offer advice on setting up or 
running a small business. Hotline; 
0171-7577030. 

□Two Business Links are offering 
hdp on coping with the millenro- 
um computer timebomb. Hamp¬ 
shire is running workshops at 
Eastleigh on March 5, Basingstoke 
on March 12 and Porstmouth on 
March 26. Call 01329 223242 for 
details. London City, which covers 


company the non-executive must 
understand the politics of family 
boards, argues John Harper, profes¬ 
sional development director at the 
Institute of Directors. The interplay 
of power is different in a small 
company and often more deference 
is paid to a non-executive than in a 
large organisation. 

The Institute of Directors is 
expanding its Director Appointment 
Service, which specialises in finding 
nonexecutive directors and chair¬ 
men. Tim Neame, who has 30 years' 
experience in executive recruitment, 
is to head the service. 

Ageism may be politically incor¬ 


rect, but it can give balance to a 
board where an older person joins a 
young company, or an injection of 
youth and new vision is added to a 
group of mature directors. 

Most non-execs who get involved 
with businesses are financially 
independent and lcoking for an 
interest rather than an income. 
Some will take a modest share in 
the business, imesring a few thou¬ 
sand pounds and charging a small 
fee for their services. Gro-NED 
suggests a minimum annual fee of 
E5.000. while 3i. which places non- 
executives in investee companies, 
suggests between £10.000 and 


BRIEFINGS 


Hackney and Islington as well as 
the City, is offering businesses 
with fewer than 200 employees a 
computer bug "health check” and. 
where necessary, up to £1.000 
towards putting faults right. Call 
0171-324 2700. 

□ The Centre for Business Incuba¬ 
tion, a national organisation to 
help young growing industries, 
has been established at Aston 
Science Park, Birmingham. The 


organisation wfll also have offices 
in London. It is sponsored by 
Midland Bank, the Prudential and 
the Department of Trade and 
Industry. Call 0121-250 3538 or 
0121-359 0981. 

□ FMC, a business consultancy 
specialising in computer disputes, 
has produced a booklet. Winning 
Computer Disputes, outlining the 
legal rights of companies with 
faulty systems. Copies normally 


15.000 for a business with a rurnover 
of less than £10 million. 

The cost of finding a non-exec 
ranges from £500 for using Gro- 
NED’s register and £ 1.500 for access 
to the Institute of Directors’ data¬ 
base to foe IoD’s individual search 
service at EISjOOO. and even more for 
the services of a headhunter. 

Investing in a non-executive may 
not bring instant returns. Like an 
American footballer they can sit on 
the sidelines for ages and then come 
on and score, but that wise counsel 
at the righi moment is invaluable. 
Gro-NED: 0171-566 4000 
Institute of Direciors:017Mi391233 


cost £4.95 but are free to Times 
readers who call 0800 731 0734. 

□ London Electricity is running a 
competition for companies with 
fewer than 75 employees who can 
show how they could become more 
successful using information tech¬ 
nology. The overall winner will 
receive £10,000. Call 0845 6008080 
for an entry form. 

□ A one-day conference on the 
impact of training on the perfor¬ 
mance of small and medium-sized 
businesses wall be held at the 
University of Warwick on March 


Technology 
support 
centres top 
fifty mark 

By Sally Watts 

MORE than 50 Local Support 
Centres to help small businesses to 
cope with communications and 
information technology have now 
been established across the country. 
The latest to open are five in the 
North East last month. A further 17 
centres are due to open this spring 
and the target is to have SO 
operating by the end of this year. 

The centres are part of the 
Government's Information Society 
Initiative and are based at Business 
links or equivalent bodies. They 
aim to provide hands-on experience 
and impartial advice to help to 
change the attitude of smaller 
businesses to technology. 

Although e-mail and video-con- 
ferendng now attract more busi¬ 
nesses, what interests 70 per cent of 
those seeking advice are the inter¬ 
net and Websites. For example, 
Davroc Limited, a leading distrib¬ 
utor of bathroom accessories in 
Hoddesdon. Hertfordshire, wanted 
a site on the World Wide Web and 
sought advice from its local LSC. 

The centre helped in each and 
every aspect of setting up a two- 
page Website; the cost — less than 
£1.000 — was soon recouped by 
increased sales, including orders 
from the US. 

Centres provide diagnostic ser¬ 
vices. visiting the business in order 
to understand its functions and 
needs. LSC staff give companies the 
opportunity to experiment with the 
new technologies and discourage 
them from buying what they do not 
need. One centre told a small firm: 
"You don’t ye* need technology. 
What you need is a sales ledger." 
ISI Programme: 0171-8281593. 

27. Details from Glenda Hall at 
foe university's business school, 
Coventry, CV4 7AL 

□ New awards have been intro¬ 
duced by the Focus Central 
London training and enterprise 
council and Midland Bank to 
recognise foe capital's best com¬ 
panies and most successful indi¬ 
viduals. Categories include 
excellence through people in small 
companies and trainee of the year. 
An overall winner will receive 
£1,000 for training and develop¬ 
ment. The closing date is February 
20. Details: 0800 919815. 



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6 


24 INTERACTIVE TEAM FOOTBALL 


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The story so fart-. 


Did you you have any big successes on the weekend of 

H^Sfn. in West Ham United's win at Newcastle 
United, and. although it wasn't in one of theshockroults. 
my Leicester City players: I've got Muzzy \nsi in both 
my teams, and Man Elliott in my Cup team, so a 1-0 win 
over Leeds United was good news. 

he™ 

injured on Saturday and didn't play. 

FbroneSiin^!n5en?g« enough transfers left. 

And for another? . . 

1 hadn't spotted that he was missing. 

team. New acquisition, was it? Dublin? Huckeroyr 
George Boareng. 

New Gening, fresh into die lists last 
anchor man - a key part Gordon Srrachan s new 
upwardly-mobile Sky Blues. )rft 

I thought you said you had no transfers left. 

Oh. he's for my Cup team. Villa 

It's a shame that Coventry are going »**« **° 
in the next round, in that case. Thqr always lose there. 
TWs all you know.This is asi good a mfat 
Coventry to overcome their Villa Park hoodoo. 

-villa Park hoodoo"? You've been reading the 

S’all'SSi'. you know, mars how1 first found out 
about Berkovic, one of my main men this season. But he 
™ iSiJUbin west Ham’s win at Neweastle. wludt 
wS ^disappointment - no appearance point. And it was 
a bit of a let-down that John Beresford has gone to 
Southampton. His transfer wont be Kgttmdl until next 

week, so 1 didnt get anythmg for Southampton 

winning at Liverpool. Plus he wont be much use in my 
Cup ream since Southampton are out. 

Speaking of West Ham. they"* got a tricky CupMhe 
routing up at home to Blackburn Rovers on Saturday. 
^ e „t a couple of the Rovers side in your Cup toun- 
No matter. Blackburn’s name is on the Cup this year 
playing Coventry in the Final - but this one couldIgo i a 
ivnlav so there will be another chance for me to score 
$!£: [ nytoieam hum things like the Walsh business. 

So what's the sec... 

Anticipation. 


Transfers a nd revaluations make 
sizeable contribution to fortunes 
nf this month’s ITTF winners^- one 
of whom predicted his victory 


I n these days when fol¬ 
lowing a big-aiy dip 
seems de rigueur, it is- 
refreshing to hear that 
Oliver Ledgaro. the January 
winner in the Youth nuip- 

league, has switched his low- 
ball allegiances, for ancestrW 
reasons, from Arsenal to Hutt- 
dersfidd Town. 

Mr Ledgard. who is study¬ 
ing for A levels at the Forefet 
School in Winnersh, ne?r 
Reading, based the success of 
his team. Oliver’s Army, 
which scored 178 points in 
January, on regular forays 
into the transfer market I've 
tried to have as many Celtic, 
Rangers. Hearts and Man¬ 
chester United players as pos¬ 
sible. looking at the fixtures to 
see who has an easy game,’ lie 

One significant element jn 
his success is the increase, 
after revaluations, of the value 
of his squad to £54 million, qp 
E19 million since die begin¬ 
ning of the season. His prize 
includes a signed footb all a nd 
two tickets to the premier 
league game of his choice. ' 
Susan Hanson, a Liverpool 
supporter for 15 years, is the 
winner of an identical monthly 
prize in the women’s league 
(with 191 points) with her 
relaunched team, Martians 
FC. “When the FA Cijp 
started, in knew I had a lot « 
transfers in hand, so I decided 
to really have a go." she said. 
“I’ve been concentrating on the 
FA Cup. but it's helped me m 
the other competition." Unlike 


TTIF TTMFS 

ITF 


5 i 




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L 



k 


A 


some entrants. Ms Hanson 
has no favoured individual 
players. “I've studied the FA 
Cup fixtures, and put in de¬ 
fenders l think will keep dean 
sheets and attackers I think 
will score goals." Jon Pregon. 
of Nottinghamshire, the De- 



- 




iheoft 










HOW IS YOUR 
TEAM DOING? 
Call the ITF 
Checkline on 

0891884643 

iKsssaaffise 

cost twice as much 


cember Main League winner, 
triumphed again in January — 

as he himself predicted joking- ■ 
ly last month. “I can’t tell you 

my secret, or it wouldn't be a 
secret any more.'* he said, but, 
when pressed, admitted: 
“Knowing how to play to the 
rules of the competition is 
more important than football 
knowledge.” The two other 
monthly mini-league prizes 
were won by contestants based 
off the mainland. Mr S. 
Isaacs, of Hummerich, Ger¬ 
many, took the students’ mini- 
league prize; the Internet prize 
went to Mrs A. Staszkiewka. of 
Ramsey, Isle of Man. 


FAXBACK: YOUR UP-TO-DATE TEAM SCORES 


if■* 1 V in - . -—: 

cuawit and total «cocbi» datM^ttmes.ahd d etaBe ■^_. i .-^v semas and touirfw 

SJaand, if awHoprtate, 

conflnnatioos am updated by!2 noon on the day fapownw ■ mawn w ^ 




Make sore yon have your bwnfigt numfaJbBtow. It your tax 

^igssssssssx^ssr 




0991111333 


If you taw 




TIF LEAGUE 
£50,000 top prize 
£ 3.000 monthly pri» 


STUDENTS' LEAGUE 
JUBfre Monthly prize of 

premiership Octets, 

signed football and 
sports bag 



PFA PLAYERS' LEAGUE 
ProtadonlidnoK 

their fantasy team 


. YOUTH LEAGUE 

MontWj prize of 
premiership Octets, 

^*!°« ba * and 

CS2ST *P° rt5bag 


WOMENS LEAGUE 


WOMEN’S LEAGUE 


1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 
9 

10 
11 = 
11 = 

13 

14 

15 

16 

17 

18 

19 

20 


SWhrtfleW 
J Gartner 
AHembrow 
B Fletcher 
5 Brooks 
C Purdy 
Adach 
M Hussain 
C Rub-Guimaraes 
jPeppar 
J Wootner 
A Finch 
L Emery 
S Reader 
p Johnston 
C Cheshire 
S Allport 
C Purdy 
M Portwood 
S Ward 


Snail Busters 
15 Chumbawumbas 
The Breconiarw 1 
Ab Fab 

Sandra’s Specials 
Kate’s Cosmos 
Fantasy Wolves 11 
Good Luck Malika 
CaJetana Aries 
PepparPots 
Jane's FC One 
Annette's Angels 
Buggsy's Boys 
Sophie Reader Fa 
xn Superstars 
Cheshire's Cate 
Farmoor Pinks 
Kate's Upstarts 
Women Can Play 2 
Never Never Lads 


STUDENTS’ LEAGUE 


1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 

9= 

9= 

11 

12 

13 

14 

15 

16 

17 

18 
19= 
19= 


N Wheatley 

Mr N Wheatley 
T Gardner 
G Wilson 
J Gardner 
E Carmichael 
F Ferguson 
Steven Shipley 
J Ftosl 
C Marianczak 
j Windcfltt 
WRazzak 
M Slade 

G Skivlngton 

N Wheatley 
KWade 
A Greaves 
0 Hargraves 
N Razzafc 
D Garrett 


H □ G Is A Sad Waster 
Wrtheridge is iH 
6 Chumbawumbas 
Dog Soldiers 
15 Chumbawumbas 
Jedi Masters 
Saucy Sue Barker 
Set Against 
Variety Sports Inter 
Jansen's XI 
Father Shabooboo 
F.mlaslsta 
Fantasia One 
Dynamo Skiv 
A Tight Horse Is Fun 
InlBr Mare AFC 
Smackmypitchup 
The Leveders 


The Spfice Boys 


YOUTH LEAGUE 


1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 
9 

10 

11 

12 

13 

14 

15 

16 
17= 
17= 
17= 
20 


M Somapaia 
D Lewis 
RWk*e 
j Gardner 
J Laurence 
MMcPhMps 
C Oyston 
0 Ledgard 
M Roberts 
C Mariancaak 
NBrotherton 
E Swirles 
G Richards 
K Tindall 
5 Mawer 
J Brady 
J Angus 
B MeMuDan 
A Hibberd 
N McGurnnuss 


Hortey Planes 
Lewis Bays 11 
Robbed 

15 Chumbawumbas 
Smooth United 
Ballyganyrovere 

The Offspring Fc 
Oliver's Army 
Krystonia Three 
Jansen's XI 
Total Commitment 
Esttwr's Entertainers 
G Force 2 
Flash XI 

Forest Ras«ves2 
Jamie'3 Jammers 
Best Of The Rest 
No Opposition 
Andy's Blue Foxes 
The tnvfnciUes 


t Mhe Madden 

2 Mr M Jones 

3 SLagg 

4 Mr M Jones 

5 DShutar 

6 Mary Ann Kennedy 

7 P turner 

S A Luckhurst 
9 = ANeviazski 
9«= P Tuner 
9= P Turner 

12 A Luckhurst 

13 A Luckhurst 
14* Mr P Turner 
14= P Turner 

16 Malcotm Jackson 

17 Mr M Jones 
IB P Bown 

19 G Plica 

20 B Fazakeriey 

21 G Rainbow 

22 A Luckhwst. 

23 -• A Luckhurst 

24 G Dolan 
25 ^ N Wheatley 
25= P Turner 

27 Barba Papa a la Bacon 

28 D Shuter 

29 Chris Forde 

30 A Luckhurst 

31 D Fenton 

32 P Turner 
33= B Bara 
33 = Susan Makm 
35 P Bee 

36= TknOUfieM 

36= P Turner 

38 J Hurt 

39= PRees 

39= Jeremy Dwyer 

41= P Shuter 

41= Mary Arm Kennedy 

43 = □ Brown 

43= C Burr 

43 = Graeme Dabnor 

46 D WaBon 

47 P Tuner 
48= M Lindquist 
48= Dbusby 
50= A J Hastings 
50= I Ralph 
50= J Hunt 

53= Mary Am Kennedy 
53= J Hunt 

55 RLockyer 

56 Mr M Jones 

57 K Partial! 

58= Mike Madden 
56= Mr D Burch 
60 P Bee 
61= Chris Forde 
61= fcGchaaJ Hudtflestone 
63= Graeme Dabnor 
63= Mr □ Patel 
65= PTumer 
65= PTumer 
67 Mr D Pa»l 
68= SGafl 
68= Mke Afison 
70= Mr N Wheatley 
70= J Hunt 
72= S Brickfield 
72= J Heather 
74= WCtaik 
74= S Whitfield 
74= N Bennett 

77 Mr D Edbrooke Stainer 

78 □ Brown 
79= T Gardner 
79= J Stnckland 
78= Philip Ward 
82= G MflOngtan 
82= Andrew Bates 
84= R Jonas 
84= KLAmoss 
84= Andy Robson 
87= KlranR Patel 
87= Graeme Dabnor 
87= Mr D PatBi 
90= BCakter 
90= MrKLethby 
92= DM Carter 
92 = TGammage 
94= RFLaridn 
94= Mr ACokaambe 
96= G Wilson 
96= Henry Wheeler 
96= G Keener 
96= Mrs P Tanstey 
100 Gerald Boylan 


Poachws never change 
JB6 

Goose 4 
JB4 
Don 2 

Inverness Undedded 
Turner's Earn! 5 
Tobs 
Nadar 

Turner's Earners 5 

Turner's Earners 5 

Tobfitt 

CarofineB 

TaTCup 

Turner's Earners 9 

Deacie 

JB5 

Bees XI 

Tta 3 Furious 

LFC4 

Rainbow's Topteam •- 

CaroBneA 

Eddie Woo 

H^QbA Sad Waster 
Tuner's E*nt 1 
Novoto Spofiere 
RasseD2 

Game of Two Pints 

UUnf.1 

WOQI 

Out Of The EBue 

Turner's Eamere 4 

Teddy 1 
Spud2 
Bumble Two 
IMnster Warriors 1 
Turner’s Earners 1 
John Hia ttTMrio n 7 
Yukon Merchants 
Nudge Nte^e Wink WHi 
DONS 
Too Fan 
Random Reserve 
| Bur's Spurs 4 
I St Remy Strikers 
! NumptyNuts 
i -Rsnet's Earners 2 
i Huntleys Rangers 
This Year's Lot 
Golden Wonders 
Marco Champions 
! John HuntTautton 8 
Oilrig Pack WIG 
I John Hunt FA Cup A 
! Rachtes 
; Jb2 

I Chelsea 6 
| iaam Fantasy Leaguers 
i Abz 

I Bumble Twetva 
) AC Dot UK 
; Pulp Faction W _ 
i St Remy Strerteghters 
I Dp4 

I Turner's Earn! 2 
1 Toma's Earners 3 
I DR2 

Rossie Rovws 
WwNet 
vnmeridfpisa 

John Hunt Teunton 1 
Bugalugs 1 
Enid 4 

Blazen Heads 
SnaaBustera 
Cant Lose B Team 
Ca 

Random Setedton 

6 Chumbawunrijas 

Ctanb 

Wannabe Heroes: 
Survivors 

Wefliertay Racing 7 

Call Bock H 

Jabbomoeky Town 
Club 18-30 
KRPFC 

St Ramy Sboaeis 
DP3 

Bob's Boys7 
KJ43 

P i rmw ood Fo rm _ 
Drawnad Goldfisn 
KrftonFC 
i Mr Wads XI 
[ DogSokfiera 
i Quito Fan 
I United 
I Az 

I Latent Margatar 


61 


Paul Simpson 
Shnon Grayson 

Steve Potts 
Jonathan Hunt 
AV-Inge Haatsnd 
JohnSeUko 
Robert Lee 
Kswn Gatocher 
David Tutfie 
Rob Savage 
Dave Watson 
Dean Blackwell 
Richard Shew 
PM Babb 
NkgoiMartyn 
Andy Townsend 
Pah* Bmger 
David Batty 
Nicky Butt 
■Teddy Shartoflhem 
- Frank Leboeuf 
DavtdSesman 
Bom Tore MramW 

Kyta Ljghtborsne 1 
Chris Powe* 

Ten Breads* 
LmObcon 
UgoEhiogu 
Pad Wtewns 
Andrew LkSdaO 
Kenny Cunningham 

Kevin rtfchcnck 
John Haodria 
Dwld Wetharefl 
Dennis Wise 
KesayKeto 
Dear Hokteworth 
John Beresford 
Gareth Southg^e 
Ian Poarca 
Kevin Mused 

LarsBohtnen 

Steve Ctertw 
Graeme La Saux 
David Beckham 
Robin van dor Laen 

, DarrenPkher 

Cofin Hendry 
Roger Cross 
Andy Roberts 
Jason EimU 

Richard Jotoon 

Gary MrisbuH 

Pontus Keamark 

Lee Sharpe 
Steve Lomas 

Andy SWon 

Spencer Pnor 
r Nefi Redhwm 
= Stewart Cesllerffne 
Darmy WBfiamson 
Alan Wright 
= Nicky Eeden 

= CoUl Cakterwood 
k John Scales 
= RobWe Fowler 
John Harison 
Mark Wright 
lateDowie 
Gary NeviBe 

LfloCandey 

Marc Edwonhy 

I MarShns 
Gianfranco Zola 

lOeWMIow 


Derby County/Wolves 
Aston Vila 
West Ham United 
Deiby County 
Leeds UnOad 
Canity city 
Newcastle United 
Btaektaum Rover* 

Crystal Palace 

Leicester Cky 

Evorton 

Wenbiedon 

ComrtryCIiy 

Ltwarpool 

Leeds Undod 

Aston VBWIfldcBeabrcHigh 

LiWHpooi 

Newcastle UnBud 

Manchester Unfed 

Manchester Untod 

Chelsea 
Arsenal 
UvefTWO* _ 

Coventry C2y 
Darby Ccreity 
Wert Ham Untod 
Amoral 
Aston Vfita 
Coventry COy 
Barnsley 
Wfcnbtadon 
Chelsea 
Bemrisy - 
Leeds United 
Chelsea 


Newcastle Unfted 
Aston Via 

fflackbum flomra/WBrt; Ham 
Crystal PelacB 

Blackburn Rcwora 

Chetase 

Chetoae 

MenchmterUrtBd 

Darby County 
Crystal Paterae 
Btockbam Rovers 
Tottenham Hcrtspre 
Crystal Palace 
VftiMedon 
Leeds Untted 
Tottenham Hotspur 
LMjeeterCtty 
Leeds United 
Wert Ham United 
Tottenham Hotepur 
Leicester C8y . 

Barnsley 
Wimbledon 
Everton 
Aston Vila 
Barnsley 

Tottenham Hottpw 
Tonenhns Hotspur 
Liverpool 
West Ham Uhfted 
Liverpool 
Wart Ham Urtted 
Manchester United 
Derby County 
Crystal Palace 
NHwcesfle United 


1 Mr M Jones 

2 Mf PTuroer 

3 Mr M Jcsies . 

4= Susan Makki 
4= SusanMakki 
8 . MrKLethby 
7= Mr PTumer 
7= Mr P Tumer 

g Mr D Er&roolce Stainer 

10 MrPTumw 

11 JonPragon 

12 GOoten. 

13= D Shuter 

13= D Fenton- - 

13- SusanMtedn. . 

13* Mr PTumer 
13= MrPTWner - 
13= J'Hurtt ■ 

19= M Ward 
19= Mr PJRimer 


•it: 


JB3 • 

TeWCup 
effli - 

Spud loir the Cup 
September Spud 
KL4S 

Te BCup ; 
TeOCup - 
IA 

TeDCup 
FA Cup 
CteratSky . 

Resssl Throe 

PJS12 • 

Spud ' ■ ~ 

TeACup 

ToOGup--- -•■■ ■ 

John ttar^W Gift B 

Inter The Blend 







384 


.Keep* dean 
Scores , 

Sieves penetty,, j, 

FM bwcfcV Cenliui iirfa nrtar 

■ nawpsctaan; iihod* * ‘ L- r -- • 
'Score*goal - “ ' 


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rw^ri^uoal ftlrttete Cohoedespenalty -ipclnt: 

- MtesosPenalty -Xpo« 

-lHW 2^T. SW ‘ : 

«!Sr / 

h^pleye.llbriWmlnutesfr. themes 


IT S NOT TOO LATE TO ENTER ITF 


£l,OOO v a signed Mitre football and a : 
Mitre Sports bag, and tickets to k premier 
league match of your chotee can be won / 
eveiy month, phis, the chance to win . 


: t 


LofcOGter C*y/Bolton 


INTERNET LEAGUE 


MWfVyv ese «*» ■« ■■—.■ • 

The mrenCBr (rfftiemonthca^lre wort by any team, nomeafer'Jt 

1 where tttaln jbeowean ITFteagw- Th« ajippty gaps ta.tha 
I person whose toiain scores, ttio Wghest potnts In-any one moftfh. ^ 
If iuu aroa stiKteat or a woman 03 or overt you m* 


hffice Madden 
Mary Ann Kennedy 

PBown 

Baiba Papa a la Bacon 
Chris Forde 
Susan Makin 
Tim Oldfield 
Jeremy Dwy* , 
Msy Ann Kennedy 
Graeme Ddbnor 
Mary Ann Kennedy 
Mike Madden 
Michael Huddtestone 
Chris Fbide 
Grasme Dabnor 
M8to AffiEon 
FhffipWard 
Andrew Bates 


Poachers never change 
Inverness Undecided 
Bees XI 

Novate Spatters 
Game at Two Pints 
Spud2 

Winstar Warfare 1 
Nudge Nudge Wink Wink 
TooFsjt 
S t Remy Strikers 
Oftrig PackRNG ' 

MMM Fantasy Usaguere 

Pulp FacBon in 

AC Dot UK 
StRemyStoaetfighw 

biter Net 

Wannabe Heroes XI 
Wethsrby Racing 7 
Ch* iMO 


ppropriatenwe-teapie. wimp jwmw * 

Youth Iea 0 to. TfMfse aH c«iy separate moriHdy prias. 

By entering tfie.ITT, your tram wU auboroaticahy be entered .... 
[' into tire »Ciftl^ire. 'W*iir pl 8 gfemtaW bdro you pqhits ter V»\ 

1 FACup teagufeflJttt ew ooc fr FAt^midTennentsScottfaftfa^ 

aswefftaLthaihdinJIPleaguo..;' r •'»- • 

-v tfOW TO BflER - 

Brtrie*tonFvfaTheTlnrt«4fre“hoi#'byphoiieoii^r > on 

8B914050U 

From tire Repubtlc of btaarid only _+44lOO 308 

Aneer leaiii wW lirnre poteteon >. morettwiLope manager afthe ; 
futwe dames. 0691 caBs oust 50p . j month, th e m noer wi>be diosag 
p«rminute,Ydi 7 ca 8 vdilcost atrandonLin ttie ewrttoftbme‘- 


st^ 


.ULnew teemwg sc owpolwlson ■.... morethaq^ooe manager aftha 

* -- - -— 1 — ****“ —--■.=*»_ .j month, theviri nn erwfllbc chasorr^- 

, .. u . __ '■ atrandom.intheevvrrtoftbme'V^' 

about double ft made from apey' . i.tmtrft mom tbonooc league 
ptone. In the event^of there bdnfi ■ tefaofer, a ttebreakwU operate. 



* 






























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"'• •■’■'.■diajndjrea 

•• r.ai^najaiia 


FEBRUARY 301998: 


Afe surprising results, the stage is set 

forthe^M them all to excite once more 


of « 

shoctoarwi surprises in - 
■the RC Carling Premier-. 
ship. : aoc-to-menfion the 
Bell’S Scotnsh-Eeague premier 
■ goals de- 

jaiwedbetbRangers and Cell- 
ic -.at- /iyfctones,- although 
DunfenfcfiM Athletic^ goal at' 
Ibrox produced a more vnex- 
pe^resutt than’ Heart of 
Midlmhiaif?',- injury>tune ". 
steilwiat'lVnficastfe. . 

TMewerelategoalft too, at * 
Ewood Park,• but Tottenham . 

> . JKfettsputfs 1 brace in the" last : 

‘ ■wunute anly ctHifiiTned their 
vtaeny against champumship 
hopduls; Blackburn, Rdveri- . 
Rovers would probably have" 
liked J a mes,- easy fixture, if .. 
suchi‘a thing ousts these days, 
to help them to recover from 
that shock , to. thdr systerora 
Cup match Safest West Ham 
United ai Utrton Park certain¬ 
ly does Yuotfirran?bOL 
In -fact,. last weekend's re- ■ 
suits surest that anyone can 
beat anyonffielse- stthe. mo- • 
ment, -which' ITF entrants 
would do wellto bear in mind 
in advance df ibe next rounds 
of the FA and Scottish cups. 

If MotberwetTv Rangers 
andDrafiarblme v edit took 
otoo dose to calL at least the 
■ Wijgaroe at Tynecastle between 
' Hearts and ‘Albion Rovers., 
promises some safe points for ; 
rTFmtmK The joint leaders 
of the Scottish League at home ' 
toateamlbreedmsjons below 
them may be the closest thing 
to a.formality:on Saturday.- . 



sports 


interactive 


South of the border, sane 
might be tempted to regard 
Leeds United, Newcastle Uni¬ 
ted and Wimbledon, who all 
entertain Nationwide League 
first division opponents, as 
equal certainties to reach the 
quarter-finals. . B irming ham 
Crfjr, Tranmere Rovers and 
Wolverhampton Wanderers 
should, an paper, present no 
problem. The answer to that is 
two words: Stevenage Bor¬ 
ough. In a co m pe ti ti o n of few 
outright shocks, some sur¬ 
prises are, sandy, overdue: 
Leeds-and Newcastle have 
both been famous fellers at 

^Wheii fiw FA Cup 
round - draw was made, 
Manchester United,drawnat 
home to other Barnsley or 
Tottenha m, were installed as. 
favourites. Memories, of their 
third-round. demolition of 


Chelsea were fresh, and they 
: had added a further five to 
their Cup tally at the expense 
. Of WalsaQ. But whal if Keith 
Branagan, the Bolmn Wan¬ 
derers goalkeeper, had not 
made that ill-advised rush 
firm goal six minutes from the 

end of Saturdays game, allow- 
ing Andy Cole to equalise? A 
second successive home defeat 
for the championship leaders, 
especially against a team occu¬ 
pying one erf the relegation 
- piac^wnuld-have set alarm 
beOs ringing m advance of the 
Manchester United v Barnsley 
game on Sunday. 

When the two teams met cm 
the same ground in the Pre- 
miership m the autumn. Uni¬ 
ted famously won 7-0. But 
now? The corpse of Barnsley’s 
hopes of remaining is the top 
Sight has "been twitching re¬ 
cently, with a run of four wins 
and two draws in thdr past six 
home garoes. and if they could 
take United back to Oakwdl 
for a replay, who knows? 

Given an away record that 
. does not bear too much dose 
scrutiny. Barnsley would not 
be many people's bet to.sur¬ 
vive at Old Traffbrd, but the 
same was said about Bolton 
last week. Add -to that the 
declared intention of Alex ftr- 
guson. the United manager, to 
rotate "his squad for home Cup 
games, and die ingredients 
could be in place for another 
unpredictable weekend. 

Nick Szczepanik 


INTERACTIVE TEAM FOOTBALL 25 

inevitable shocks 


AND THIS SATURDAY’S FA CUP SCORES ARE .. 



MANCHESTER UNITED 1 




BARNSLEY 2 ■ WIMBLEDON 2 


WOLVERHAMPTON W 3 


/ 

-^1 


. v • 

Mier 

i’f 

m 


this week’s moves 


41401 Gay Speed 


MOVED 

Newcastle 
ffrom EvertonJ 

OUT 

Hibernian 


NEWCASTLE UNITED 0 


TRANMERE 1 ■ LEEDS UNITED 


0 BIRMINGHAM CITY 3 


61601 Jim Duffy Hibernian £lm 

HOW TO MAKE A TRANSFER 

□ YOU MAY transfer as and when you wish according to your team 
transfer allowance. II a player or manager moves teams during the 
season, ii may affect the composition of your team. You may adjust 
your team by using the transfer system to avoid missing out on 
points. 

□ EACH TEAM that was entered at the start of the season was 
allocated 60 transfers for the season and each team registering alter 
that date had its number of transfers reduced by three per week up to 
December 13. Teams registered before noon that day were allocated 
an extra 20 transfers. Teams registered since then and from now on 
will be allocated 20 transfers tor the rest of the season. 

O THE LINE is open now and will remain open for the rest of the 
season You may only make transfers by using a Touch-lone (DTMF) 
telephone (most push-button telephones with a ’ and a hash key are 
Touch-tone). You wdl need ten digits for your PIN which you will have 
to tap in (not speak) Follow the simple instructions and tapinlhe five- 
digit codes of the players that you are transferring. 

□ YOU MAY make up to four transfers per call but may make as 
many cads as you wish to achieve the required amount of transfers 

□ TRANSFERS made before 12 noon on any day will become 
effective tor malches starting after that time Transfers made after 12 
noon will become effective for matches starring after 12 noon the 
following day. 

□ YOUR NEW player only starts to score points for you when his 
transfer is registered. The current score of the player transferred out 
remains part of your team score but he then ceases to score tor you 

□ CALLS COST 50p per minute and calls Irom a telephone box cost 
approximately twice as much. 

Transfer number: 0891 884 628. 

Outside the UK: +44 990 200 538. 


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30403 M Appleby 
30502 C Hendry 

30504 S Henchoz 

30505 T Pedersen 

30601 G Taggart 

30602 G Bergsson 

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30604 MRsh 
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30702 M Mac Kay 

30703 A Stubbs .. 

30704 MHteper : 

30801 FLeboauf 

30802 MDuberry 

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30804 B Lambourde 

30901 LDatsh 

30902 R Shew 

30903 P Williams 

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31002 AUnlghan 

31003 D Tuttle . 

31004 HHreklarsson 

31101 I Stbnac 

31102 J Laursen 
31201 S Pressley 
31301 G Shields 

31401 SBIBc 

31402 D Watson 
31404 CBIer 
31501 D Weir 
31601 J Hughes 

31801 DWetheraU 

31802 G Halla 

31803 RMolenaar 

31804 LRadabe 

31901 MEHlott 

31902 PKaamark 

31903 S Walsh 

31904 S Prior 

32001 M Wright 

32002 DMatteo 

32003 BTKvarme 

32004 P Babb 
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32101 D May 

32102 G PaHlatar 

32301 P Albert 

32302 D Peacock 

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32304 APtetone 

32401 SPorrin! 

32402 J BJoridtmd 

32403 L Amoroso 

32404 Ft Gough 

32501 D Walker 

32502 J Newsome 

32503 P Atherton 

32701 R Dryden 

32702 C Lundekvam 
32704 KMontou 
32601 S McCJusksy 

32801 S Campbell 

32802 J Scales 

32803 R Vega 

32804 CCaklerwood 

32901 B Ferdinand 

32902 R Hall 

31403 DUftsworth 

32903 S Potts 

32904 I Pearce 

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33002 D Bteckwefl 


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G HRcreft 
A Thompson 
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Aberdeen 2.00 
Arsenal 3.00 
Arsenal 3.00 
Arsenal 2.00 

Arsenal 3.00 
Aston ViBa 3.00 

Aston ViBa 3.00 

Bamstey 1.00 
Barnsley 050 
Barnsley 0.50 
Blackburn 3.00 
Blackburn 3.00 
Blackburn 2.00 
Bolton W 150 

Bolton W 1.00 

Bolton W 1.00 

Bolton W 150 

Celtic 1.50 

Celtic 3.00 

Celtic 3.00 

Cattle 3.00 

Chelsea 3.00 
Chelsea 3.00 
Chelsea 250 
Chelsea 250 
Coventry City 150 
Coventry City 150 
Coventry City 150 
Crystal Palace 150 
Crystal Palace 0.75 
Crystal Palace 0.75 
Crystal Palace 1.00 
Derby 250 

Derby 150 

Dundee UW 2.00 
Dunfermline 150 
Everton 150 
Everton 1.50 

Everton 150 

Hearts 3.00 

Hibernian ZOO 
Leeds Utd Z50 

Leeds Utd ZOO 

Leeds Utd ZOO 

Leeds Did ZOO 

Leicester City 3.50 
Leicester (Sty ZOO 
Leicester City 250 
Leicester City ZOO 
Liverpool 3.00 
Liverpool 3.00 
Liverpool ZOO 
Liverpool 3.00 
Man Utd 3.50 


Man Utd 

3.50 

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Man Utd 

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Newcastle 

Z50 

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Newcastle 

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Newcastle 

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Newcastle 

3.00 

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Hangars 

4.00 

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Sheffield Wed 

2.00 

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Southampton 

1.00 

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Southampton 

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Aberdeen 
Aberdeen 
Arsenal 
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Arsenal 
Arsenal 
Arsenal 
Aston Vffia 
Aston VKa 
Barnsley 
Bamstey 
Bamstey 
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Blackburn 
Blackburn 
Blackburn 
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Bolton W 
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Bolton W 
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40605 J Pollock 
I 40702 P O’Donnell 
i 42503 R Blinker 

40704 C Burley 

40705 P Lambert 
i 40801 D Wise 

40802 R Dl Matteo 

40803 E Newton 

40804 G Poyet 
40601 G McAllister 

40902 TESottvedt 

40903 J Satako 

40904 P Tetter 
40605 G Boateng 

41002 S Rodger 

41003 D Pitcher 

41004 P Warfiurst 

41005 A Lombardo 

41102 SEranlo 

41103 D Powell 

41104 C Oaiffy 

41105 R vender Lean 

41106 J Hunt 
41201 R Winters 
41301 A Smith 

41401 G Speed 

41402 J Parkinson 

41403 G Farrelly 

41404 DWffltamson 

41405 JOster 
41501 N McCann 

41601 C Jackson 

41602 B Lavety 
41701 J McIntyre 
41001 D HopWn 

41801 LBowyer 

41802 AI Haafand 

41803 L Sharpe 

41804 8 Rlbetro 

41901 G Parker 

41902 N Lennon 

41903 U izzet 

41904 S Taylor 

42001 S McManaman 

42002 O Leon hardsell 

42003 M Thomas 

42004 J Redknapp 
42006 Plnce 

42101 D Beckham 

42102 R Giggs 

42103 R Keane 

42104 N Butt 

42105 A Cole 
42201 B Davies 

42301 R Lee 

42302 KGHfespte 

42303 D Batty 

42005 J Barnes 

42401 B Laudrop 

42402 P Gascoigne 

42403 J Them 

42404 J Albertz 

42501 B Carbone 

42701 J MegHton 

42502 M Pern bridge 

42504 G Hyde 

42505 G Whfttfngham 

42702 R Slater 

42704 K Richardson 

42705 C Palmer 
42708 MOafctey 
42601 A Sekeriloglu 

42801 ASinton 

42802 DAnderton 

42803 R Fox 

42804 D Howefls 

42805 DGInola 

42806 N Betti 

42901 E Berkovlc 

42902 S Lomas 

42903 J Honour 

42905 FLampard 

42906 T Sinclair 

43001 R Earle 

43002 NArdtey 

43003 V Jones 

42904 M Hughes 

43004 C Hughes 


Bolton W ZOO 
Celtic 3.00 

Celtic 3.00 

Celtic 4.00 

Celtic 3.00 

Chelsea 350 
Chelsea 4.00 
Chelsea 150 
Chelsea 3.00 
Coventry City 2.50 
Coventry City 1.50 
Coventry City 150 
Coventry City 1.50 
Coventry City 150 
Crystal Palace 1.00 
Crystal Palace 0.25 
Crystal Palace 150 
Crystal Palace ZOO 
Derby 350 

Derby 1.50 

Derby 150 

Derby 1.00 

Derby 1.00 

Dundee Utd 350 
Dunfermline 3.50 
Everton 350 
Everton 1.50 
Everton 1.50 

Everton ZOO 
Everton 2.50 
Hearts 3.50 

Hibernian 2.00 
Hibernian ZOO 
Kilmarnock 2.00 
Leeds Utd ZOO 

Leeds Utd 3.00 

Leeds Utd 3.00 

Leeds Utd 2.50 

Leeds Utd 2.50 

Leicester City ZOO 
Leicester City ZOO 
Leicester City ZOO 
Leicester City 1.50 
Liverpool 6.00 
Liverpool 3.00 
Liverpool 3.00 
Liverpool 3.00 
Liverpool 4.00 
Man Utd 8.00 

Man Utd 7.00 

Man Utd 5.00 

Man Utd 4.00 

Man Utd 850 

MotherweH ZOO 
Newcastle 5.00 
Newcastle 350 
Newcastle 250 
Newcastle 3.00 
Rangers 6.50 
Rangers 6.00 
Rangers 3.00 
Rangers 4.00 
Sheffield Wed 3.00 
Sheffield Wed ZOO 
Sheffield Wed ZOO 
Sheffield Wed 1.00 
Sheffield Wed 1.50 
Southampton 0.75 
Southampton 0.50 
Southampton ZOO 
Southampton 1.50 
St Johnstone 0.75 
Tottenham ZOO 
Tottenham ZOO 
Tottenham ZOO 
Tottenham ZOO 
Tottenham 3.50 
Tottenham ZOO 
West Ham 350 

West Ham 250 

West Ham ZOO 

West Ham 250 

West Ham 3.50 

Wimbledon 3.00 
Wimbledon ZOO 
Wimbledon ZOO 
Wimbledon 3.00 
Wimbledon 150 


tee 

0 1 1 35 

0 0 0 7 

0 2 0 24 

0 3 2 64 

0 3 2 30 

0 0 0 38 

0 0 0 40 

0 0 1 13 

0 0 0 28 
0 0 0 20 
0 3 2 31 

0 0 0 15 

0 7 3 23 

0 0 3 3 

0 3 0 29 

0 0 0 0 
0 3 0 34 

0 0 0 22 
0 1 1 33 

O 3 0 17 

0 0 1 20 
0 0 0 8 
0 0 0 16 
0 6 2 53 

0 27 1 75 

0 0 1 51 

0 0 0 0 
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0-10 5 

0 2 1 61 
0 1 1 11 
0 0 1 25 

0 0 1 1 
0 2 1 35 

0 6 0 24 

0 0 134 

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0 7 6 32 

0 3 3 47 

0 2 3 49 

0 0 0 0 
0 1 1 72 

0 0 1 40 

0 0 0 14 

0 4 0 41 

0 0 1 36 

0 10 1 67 

0 2 1 60 
0 0 0 23 

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2 5 3 39 

2 6 3 47 

2 3 2 27 

0 4 0 50 

0 2 1 42 




Rife Z.-:'- 

£ AIM FA l£(W) Tot 


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0 10 0 
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0 12 0 




50101 W Dodds 

50201 I Wright 

50202 D Bergkamp 

50301 DYorto 

50302 S Coffymore 

50303 S Milosevic 

50401 G Hristov 

50402 J Hendrie 

51102 A Ward 

50403 CMarcette 

50404 J A Fjortoft 

50501 KGaliacher 

50502 MDahlin 

50503 C Sutton 

50602 N Blake 

50603 P Beardsley 
53003 D Hokisworth 
51601 D Jackson 

50703 T Johnson 

50704 S Donnelly 

50705 HLarsson 

50801 G Zola 

50802 M Hughes 

50803 TAFlo 

50901 D Dublin 

50902 D Huckerby 

50903 N Whelan 

50904 V Moldovan 
51001 N Shlppertey 

51003 B Dyer 

51004 MPadovano 
51101 D Stunfdge 

51103 FBalano 

51104 D Burton 

51105 P Wanchope 

51201 A McLaren 

51202 K Otofeson 
51301 G Britton 

51401 D Ferguson 

51402 N Barm by 


Aberdeen 4.00 
Arsenal 7.50 
Arsenal 8.50 
Aston Villa 6.00 

Aston Villa 5.00 

Aston Villa 3.00 

Barnsley 1.50 
Barnsley 1.50 
Barnsley ZOO 
Barnsley 1.00 
Barnsley ZOO 
Blackburn 6.50 
Blackburn 4.00 
Blackburn 6.50 
Bolton W 3.50 

Bolton W ZOO 

Bolton W 3.00 

Celtic 4.00 

Celtic 2.50 

Celtic 4.50 

Celtic 4.50 

Chelsea 7 .00 
Chelsea 3.50 
Chelsea 4.00 
Coventry City 6.00 
Coventry City 4.00 
Coventry City ZOO 
Coventry City 3.00 
Crystal Palace 1.50 
Crystal Palace 3.00 
Crystal Palace 2.50 
Derby 4.00 

Derby 5.00 

Derby 1.50 

Derby 3.50 

Dundee Utd 3.00 
Dundee Utd 4.00 
Dunfermline ZOO 
Everton 4.00 
Everton 3.00 


51404 D Cadamarteri Everton 


51501 J Robertson 

51502 J Hamilton 
51602 S Crawford 

51701 P Wright 

51702 A Mitchell 


Hearts 

Hearts 

Hibernian 

Kilmarnock 

Kilmarnock 


51801 J F Hasselbalnk Leeds Utd 


51803 R Wallace 

51804 H Kewell 

51901 SCfaridge 

51902 E Heskey 

51903 I Marshal] 

51904 G Fenton 

52001 R Fowler 

52002 P Berger 

52003 KRtedte 

52004 M Owen 

52101 OG Soisfcjaer 

52102 E Sheringham 

52103 P Scholes 

52201 O Coyle 

52202 T Coyne 

52301 A Shearer 

52304 J D Tomasson 

52305 AAndersson 

52401 M Negri 

52402 S Rozental 

52403 G Durie 

52501 A Booth 
50702 P CM Canto 
52503 R Humphreys 

52701 M Le Ussier 

52502 D Hirst 

52702 EOstensted 
52704 K Davies 

52601 G O'Boyle 

52602 R Grant 

52801 S tversen 

52302 L Ferdinand 

52802 C Armstrong 

52803 J Dominguez 

52804 J KHnsmann 

52901 J H&rtson 

52902 PKttson 

53001 M Gayle 

53002 EEkoku 
53004 CCort 


Leeds Utd 3.50 

Leeds Utd ZOO 

Leicester City Z50 
Leicester City 4.50 
Leicester City Z50 
Leicester City ZOO 
Liverpool 8.00 

Liverpool 3.00 

Liverpool 4.50 

Liverpool 4.50 

Man Utd 7.50 

Man Utd 7.00 

Man Utd 6.00 

Motherwell 3.00 

Motherwell 3.00 

Newcastle 10.00 

Newcastle ZOO 

Newcastle 3.00 

Rangers 8.50 

Rangers 3.50 

Rangers 3.00 

Sheffield Wed 3.00 
Sheffield Wed 3.00 
Sheffield Wed ZOO 
Southampton 7.00 
Southampton 2.50 
Southampton 2.50 
Southampton 4.00 
St Johnstone 1.50 
St Johnstone 1.00 
Tottenham ZOO 

Tottenham 6,00 

Tottenham Z50 

Tottenham ZOO 

Tottenham 5.00 

West Ham 6.00 

West Ham 3.00 

Wimbledon 3.00 

Wimbledon 3.00 

Wimbfadon ZOO 


1 57 

1 67 

3 39 

1 38 


1 71 

1 37 


1 23 

5 48 

0 52 

1 31 


1 37 

1 58 


1 29 

4 56 


1 26 
0 9 


1 36 

1 43 

1 41 

7 12 


1 114 

0 0 


1 39 

0 6 
0 24 

6 36 

4 21 

1 15 

1 40 



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60102 A Milter 

Aberdeen 

1.50 

0 

-1 

2 

9 1 

61601 J Duffy 

Hibernian 

1.00 

0 

-1 

-1 

0 

60201 A Wenger 

Arsenal 

4.00 

0 

7 

3 

47 

81701 R Williamson 

Kilmarnock 

1.00 

0 

3 

3 

26 

60301 B Little 

Aston Villa 

Z50 

0 

7 

3 

26 

61801 G Graham 

Leeds Utd 

3.00 

0 

6 

-1 

35 

60401 D Wilson 

Barnsley 

0.50 

3 

7 

4 

14 

61901 M O'Neill 

Leicester City 

Z50 

0 

2 

3 

31 

60501 R Hodgson 

Blackburn 

4.50 

0 

6 

-1 

47 

62001 R Evans 

Liverpool 

4.00 

0 

-1 

-1 

38 

60601 CTodd 

Boiton W 

1.50 

0 

-1 

1 

12 

62101 A Ferguson 

Man Utd 

5.00 

0 

6 

1 

51 

60701 W Jansen 

Celtic 

4.00 

0 

3 

4 

48 

62201 A McLelsh 

Motherwell 

1.00 

0 

4 

-1 

11 

60801 R Gullit 

Chelsea 

3.50 

0 

-1 

-1 

38 

62301 K Dalglish 

Newcastle 

3.00 

3 

7 

2 

28 

60901 GStrachan 

Coventry City 

1.00 

0 

6 

3 

27 

62401 W Smith 

Rangera 

5.00 

0 

3 

1 

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61001 S Coppell 

Crystal Palace 0.75 

0 

6 

0 

18 

62502 R Atkinson 

Sheffield Wed 

ZOO 

0 

3 

-1 

18 

61101 J Smith 

Derby 

2.50 

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2 

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33 

62701 D Jones 

Southampton 

1.50 

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3 

18 

61201 T McLean 

Dundee Utd 

ZOO 

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3 

3 

20 

62601 P Sturrocfc 

St Johnstone 

050 

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3 

-1 

24 

61301 RPaton 

Dunfermline 

1.00 

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1 

18 

62802 C Gross 

Tottenham 

ZOO 

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3 

2 

11 

61401 H Kendaff 

Everton 

2.00 

0 

-1 

1 

16 

62901 H Redknapp 

WestHam 

ZOO 

0 

6 

3 

33 

61501 J Jefferies 

Hearts 

4.00 

0 

3 

1 

48 

53001 JIGmear 

Wimbledon 

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7 

0 

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THE TIMES TODAY 


TUESDAY FEBRUARY 101998 


NEWS 


Peers vote to stop price-cutting 


■ The Government suffered a heavy defeat as peers voted to 
restrict cut-price campaigns by national newspapers. 

The Lords voted by 121 votes to 93 for an amendment to the 


Competition Bill which aimed to prevent any newspaper 

_i_-:_i ■‘Jimimla" inw j-jygj 


abusing a “dominant position” to “eliminate" any 
publications. Ministers will attempt to overturn it in the 
Commons but will face trouble from the Left.-Page I 


Royal Family wants early inquest 

■ Members of the Royal Family are pressing for a swift 
inquest into the death of Diana, Princess of Wales, to try to end 
the feverish speculation and conspiracy theories surrounding 
her last hours. Buckingham Palace is increasingly anxious for 
the French authorities to complete their criminal investigation 
to enable a British inquest to go ahead-Pages U X 15-17 


Iraq gas stocks 

President Saddam Hussein has 
built up big stocks of the nerve 
gas Agent IS, which is designed to 
stupefy enemy forces. The gas can 
be fired from missiles or put in 
water supplies-Pages L 13 

Powell’s poems 

A batch of Enoch ftnveU’s early 
love poems were at the centre of a 
literary mystery after a senior 
Church of England clergyman 
claimed they were addressed to a 
man---Page I 


£57,000 for nightmare 

A former Royal Marine was 
awarded £57,000 compensation 
for die ‘’recurring nightmare” he 
has suffered after going to the aid 
of survivors of the Kegworth air 
disaster-Page 7 

Murder admission 

An apparently respectable stu¬ 
dent was jailed for life for the 
murder of Louise Smith, 18, two 
years ago. David Frost 22, admit¬ 
ted the crime-Page 8 


Sour note 

The organisers of the Brit Awards 
attacked the sneering “hypocrisy" 
of bands who refused to perform 
at the ceremony to maintain 
street credibility-Page I 


CSA reform 

A simple tax rate for child mainte¬ 
nance payments is being consid¬ 
ered by Ministers as part of a 
radical reform of the Child Sup¬ 
port Agency to be announced in 
the summer_Page 2 


Helping servants 

Overseas domestic staff are to be 
given the right to leave their em¬ 
ployers under government plans 
to curb ill-treatment and improve 
working conditions Page 10 

Nigerian attack 

Nigeria launched a lag air and 
artillery offensive against Sierra 
Leone’s military junta in a cam¬ 
paign that owes more to a desire 
for diamonds than a respect for 
democracy Page 11 


Curate retires 


A Church of England curate has 
taken early retirement over his 
relationship with a trainee Bap¬ 
tist minister sent to his parish on 
work experience-Page 5 


Euro under fire 

Germany’s opponents to the euro 
dosed ranks for a final charge 
against Helmut Kohl’s cherished 
project of a common European 
currency...-Page 12 


Testing time 

Most primary school pupils may 
face national tests every year 
from the age of seven malting 
English children the most tested 
in the Western world-Page 6 


Cigar alarm 

US health offidais. alarmed by 
spiralling cigar sales among 
women and younger smokers, 
may soon require agar advertise¬ 
ments lo cany the Surgeon Gen¬ 
eral’s health warning—Page 14 


Women’s gloomy view of life 


■ Women say their life is all work, little play and even less 
passion. They are depressed about their looks, worried about 
their health, frequently stressed and overwhelmingly believe 
that men have the better deal in life. The findings are from 
replies sent in by 5,000 women to a survey conducted by the 
magazine Top Santi in association with Bupa-Page 4 



S pecta to rs’ seals are cleared at the Winter Olympics in Hakuba, Japan. Heavy snow has delayed some ski events. Page 47 


Banks: The converted building so¬ 
cieties, are so flush with cash that 
they could afford to hand back £1.7 
billion to their shareholders this 
year--Page 27 


British Airways: The airline’s third- 
quarter profits fell below many an¬ 
alysts' expectations after a suprise 
£32 million charge-..Page 27 


Economy: High street sales came 
back in January after a mixed 
Christmas as shoppers rushed to 
pick up bargains in die sales. Sales 
growth ran at its highest since Au¬ 
gust 1996._Page 27 


Markets: The FTSE 100 fell 28-S 
points to 5600.9. Sterling’s trade- 
weighted index fell bom 104.4 to 
1042 after a fall from $1.6505 to 
$1.6340 but a rise from DM2.9603 
to DM2.9639_Page 30 


Cricket: Carl Hooper, the man of 
the match, scored an outstanding 
94 not out to steer West Indies to a 
three-wicket victory over England 
in the second Test in Port of 
Spain-..Page 52 


Footbarf: Alan Shearer is delighted 
to be back in the England squad for 
die international against Chile at 
Wembley, hoping to play a part in 
the game-Page 48 

Rugby union: The French have 


complained to the RFU over allega¬ 
tions that Jason Leonard stamped 
on Thomas Lievremont during the 
international in Paris-Page 52 

Athletics: Andy Norman, the for¬ 
mer British promotions officer, is 
playing an increasingly influential 
rale in the effort to resuscitate the 
sport in this country -Page 46 




Viennese wftM: The all-male dance 
troupe with the silly name — the 
Featherstonehaughs — has a new 
show based on the sketches of Egon 
Schiele —--Page 34 


Staging dong: In defiance of 
Government moves against music 
in cnir primary schools, a char¬ 
ity is introducing children and 
their teachers to the joys of 
singing-Page 34 


Never the bride: Joan Cusack has 
gone from being Melanie Griffith’s 
best friend in Working Girt to play¬ 
ing the jilted bride of Kevin Kline in 
tiie comedy In & Out ...Page 35 

Continental drift The Gate Theatre 
has launched n season of European 
plays with offerings from Germany 
and Norway that leave Benedict 
Nightingale unmoved-Page 36 



TOMORROW 


IN THE TIMES 


■ PROPERTY 
The People & Property 
supplement comes up 
with some sure ideas 
for those who seek 
the quiet life 


■ INTERFACE 
Traps to beware 
if you seek love 
on the Internet 


Diana’s death: The Times begins its 
serialisation of the most searching 
journalistic investigation info the 
death of Diana. Princess of Wales. 
We reveal details of the missing 
pregnancy test files; the desperate 
fight to save Diana’s life and. for 
the first time, Mohamed.Al Fayed 
speaks of his loss-Page B-17 


Dr Thomas Stuttafonk On cancer 
of the oervix. diabetes, flower aller¬ 
gies. backache and phantom preg¬ 
nancies— —--Page 16 


Outsiders: Small firm s c a n rbenefit 
from part-time directors^ Page 23 


Action plan: John Mortis. QC, tells 
Frances Gibb how fie marked to 
Attorney-General——.— PageJ9 


Serving justice; The case of the 
judge and the media: how could 
justice be best served? .Page 41 


What is mast disturbing about ffie 
Palestinian support for any pptero- 
tiai Iraqi aggression against Israel, 
even if not endorsed by the leader- 
ship, is that it smacks of a Palestm- 
ian return to this rgectionist cainp 
that is not interested in negotiating 
peace on apy terms. Israelis need to 
be convinced that the peace process 
is not just abont land for the Pales¬ 
tinians, but also peace for TsratiHs 
—The Jerusalem. Post 


Preview: Who would want to be a 
sbperrnaJd? Inside Story Darted 
(BBCl, 10pm). Rw|« A rough 
ride in Blacfcpool-U4* PagwSfl,51 


Honest banker 

.Was the Govenanent seriaisababr 
wanting .a non-political monetary . 
policy designed to keep inflfflkai . 
permanenfiy under conirol orwas 
the decision to give independence 
to the Bank of England just a sfical- 
term political wftttS? r -^7age 19 " 

Opaque signals 

The Wert. .Russia and even , the 
Arab League are stepping up the .. 
pressure. And few of Saddam'S, 
neighbours hare art? interest at tas0^. 
survival^.. ., .... ;— . - . Page W ”. 


New Britain, old men . 

There is only one answer, to move, 
to East Anglia. Women who -five 
there are the most likely to enjoy 
their jobi to consider themselves 
the right weight, » fee* vbry a* 
tractive to men and to harea “fan¬ 
tastic” sex —Paw » 



LIBBY PURVES 

Evening, all. Down here at Drxk 
Greoq nick. I don’t mind tefim£ 
you, we think a lot of Jack Straw. 
Talks cmnmonsense and knows a 
tiling or two about giving ywmg- W/ 
sters a good taflang-to.~~.Page B 

ANATOLE KALEtSKY 

With no hope of currency ;reafigrb '. 
meats or differences m inSstXEX v 
-the Germans in EMlhwilLhe able- 
to regam thefr competitiveness only , 
by cutting their wages ——Page® •" 
ALAIN de BCmOII- 
Tte promotion trf creativity 
Government reoris depetidereoxa 
peculiar concept; that creativity is 
positive, danooatic and cheerful 
But creativity lsuafiy eherges ' 
fromdeepdistress———-.ftqge-B ' 1 

PETER RIDDELL. 




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Unless councils thnn&ivesbavetn •' - 
raise most oftiie money they spend, 
andTtherefore bare toYJefepd the^ 
level of Jakes, any revival of Jocair : 
democracy w3t he Untiled - Page 9! 


Carf WBsori, ain^z; &£rtol 8&I 
Cook; HMBdor Uwmw, NobeT 


_ r . 1 .___ NobeT 

prizewirtfling write^l^-Pagr 21 


Eaechc-PoweS^ ‘'first kwe" and 
Heatii’SiVaJkacei -Iraq; European 
fc d e ttife fcvac an ations^.Page 19 


THE TIMES CROSSWORD NO 20,711 



ACROSS 

1 One who ruled in p re-An to nine 
Rome (4). 

3 Might be get one person Ibw? 
(4.6). 

9 The sound of a pig at home in 
agreeable surroundings (4). 

10 What workers give the queen — 
for palace parties? (5.5J. 

12 Courage perceived to be genuine 
(9). 

13 Material for Siaette? (5). 

14 Go inio battle to win some 
ground (4.3.5). 

15 After a licking, one's put in the 
comer (7,5). 

21 Point we're wrong about — make 
a fresh start (5). 

22 A leader of opinion ? (9). 

24 Game boss producing good pos¬ 
ition for expansion (10). 


25 Question a cause of inflation (4). 

26 Amt in mood lo recollect warning 
(10). 

27 What divides the church, we hear, 
in Ireland, perhaps ft). 


Solution to Puzzle No 20,710 


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DOWN 

1 They open out for the novice^). 

2 Smuggled wines and rifles (8). 

4 Arguments supporting point in 
(dam speaking (S). 

5 Mean artkte to reveal narrow 
escape (4J). 

6 Protest not as practical as a 
striking example (6,6). 

7 A purely symbolic bunch of 
flowers (6)- 

8 What boy does with toy — and 
same with game? (6). 

11 Locale vibration on vehicle (7,5). 

15 The earner needs to be adjusted 
for the jump (9). 

16 They’re worn by soldiers for tg. 
cleaning drains (8). 

17 Order a sweet (53). 

19 In song. sailor lands far away (6). 

20 Not well employed by company 

(6J- 

23 I owned a small property in this 
state (5). 




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HOURS OF MRKISSS 


Sun rtsea: 
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□ Moonaeb 
640 am 
moon tomorrow 
London S 06 pm to 7 23 am 
BrtsTol 5 16 pm to 7 33 a^i 
EcSnburqh 5 05 pm W 7 47 am 
Manchester 5.06 pm to 7 36 wr 
P e man cr S 31 pm «o 7 4i 


Sun&es: 
5 06 om 


Moonrise3 
423 pm 




□ General: mild again everywhere. Scot¬ 
land wffl be windy with showers, but there 
wfll also be sunny spells. Northern Ireland 
and northern England will see a law 
showers, but also bright speBs. Wales and 
central England win be mostly dul with light 
rain. There may also be some drizzle in 
southwest England but the South East will 
be dry and bright 

□ London, SE England, E Anglia, Cent 
S England: cloudy at times but also sunny 
spells, mfid. Light to moderate southwest 
wind. Max IX |55F). 

□ Mhfiands, E England, Cent N Eng¬ 
land, NE England: doudy with patefy 
drizzle, but mild Light southwest wmd. Max 
IX 154F). 

□ Channel Isles: dry with some good 
spells of sunshine, light southwest wind. 
Max IX (54F). 

Osw England, Wales, NW England, 


Lake District, Me of Man: mW but mostly 
dull, drizzle in places. Light to modera te 
.~2C(54F). 


southwest wind. Max IX 

□ Borden, Ecflidwrah & Dundee, 
Aberdeen, Moray Firth, NE Scotland, 
Orkney, SheSand: a few showers, one or 
two sunny breaks. Moderate to fresh 
southwestwind. Max 11C (52F). 

□ 5W Scotland, Glasgow, Cent High¬ 
land*, Argyll, NW Scotland: scattered 
showers. Moderate to fresh amihwest 
wind. Max 11C (52F). 

□ N Ireland: mid with sane bright epeBs. 
and the odd shower. Ught to moderate 
southwestwind. Max 11C ($2F). -• 

□ Republic of Intend: cloud and patohy 
rain spreading north.-Wind light soiXhwest 
fieshening. Max 11C (S2F). 

□ Outlook: windy in North wWi torthar 
rain. Elsewhere <*y, mrkt 


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TIMES 







BUSINESS 

_ J - ,.l - — —' 

Surveying outlook 
sees firms look west 
in fight for capital 
PAGE 31 



m 


ARTS 

Joan Cusack takes 
the mantel of 
film success 

PAGES 34-36 



SPORT 

Fowler intent 
on making 
striking return 
PAGES 45-52 


BUSINESS EDITOR Patience Wheatcroft 


TUESDAY FEBRUARY 10 1998 


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windfall 
possible 
from new 
banks 

Bv Richard Miles ! 

BANKING CORRESPONDENT 

BRITAIN’S new banks, the 
converted buOdrng societ¬ 
ies, arc so fiasb with cash 
that-they could affoifita 
hand bade £L7 bifikm to 


Railtrack aims to save £2.7bn 
by shorten tunnel link 


Halifax. Woolwich and 
Alliance &' Leicester are 
sitting on aiiDess capital 
with a'combined value of 
£5 Trillion, according to 
research published fay Salo¬ 
mon Smith Bamey.theUS 
inv e a mw it limk- ^ 

Salomon befincs die 
three hanks could comfort¬ 
ably return athird of this 
surplus during ? the 1997 
financial year before runc- 
ning • into • problems' with 
advance, enpdrifini tax. 
Distribution would be ei¬ 
ther through - a shave, 
buyback or payrnentofa 
special dividend. ; 

Salomon argnes that the 
three convert? must reduce 
their cash Jcvds - to the 
industry norm if they are to 
make optiaroni ikc offoeir 
assets. Two of 1 he= banks.' 
Halifax and Woohricb, 
have already indicated fojy 
may return some of the 
surplus to sharebotdtts. - 
The excess capital can 
either be bsetf to support - 
g rowt h — organic w. by.; 
apadkit or it can be 
tdunied: to- shareholders." 
Salomon said it sew few ' 
opportumliesto deploy cur^ 
rent capital m existing busi¬ 
ness fines while 
tbe actpiisition route in¬ 
volved risk: 

Halifax; the UK’s largest 
mortgage fender, has * file 
biggest cash -mountain. It . 
cook! return an estimated 
EL12 bSfian fins year, and - 
douUetbat amount in 1998. 
Affiance & Leicester has 
£357 maOron. while Wool- 
wkh has £2U million. 
A gain, both banks would 
be able to ret u r n double 
that amount next year. 

Shareholders m Wool¬ 
wich are most tifcdy to 
benefit. from. a... share 
buyback or special dftti-: 
dad. John Stewart chief. 1 

executive. , intends, to 
present plans to return 


By Arthur Leathley ■ 
transport 

' CORRESPONDENT ; - 

RAILTRACK is pre^ng 
minis ters to cut the r oyt ch 
the ChanndThnneJ raO link 
by some £27 trillion fay 
ending the high-speed sec- 
tkm sfiort of London. 

:■ A £13 - laffion high-speed 
fink, finishing " rn north Kent 
rather fiian London's St Pan- 
eras station, wall be pot for¬ 
ward fay the Rafitrack board 
as its price for rescuing the 
beleaguCTed project; 

The plan, to run the fink 
only to Southfieet, dose to 
Ebhsfiea, south of the River 
Thames .and then connect-to 
Waterloo station via. existing 
stow! lines, -is estimated to 
reduce assts from £4 faillionto 
«3biffion. 

The original 6frmile scheme, 
running to St Pannas under 
the Thames and via East Lond¬ 
on, involved more than 12 miles 
of tunnefling which Railtrack 1 
befiewes is not cc Bn g gr aaHy 


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viable. Railtrack remains fire 
leading candidate to take over 
die project which fell into 
disarray last month when 
London & Continental Rail¬ 
ways, the consortium behind 


the scheme, asked the Govern¬ 
ment to bail out the profea. 

The consortium asked for a 
furfiie £13 billion, on top of 
£12 billion already promised 
by the previous Goremment, 


when it was unable to raise 
private sector hinds. The con¬ 
sortium. which was also los¬ 
ing £180 million a year runn¬ 
ing the Eurostar train service, 
was facing total costs of some 


£6 billion, when debts and int¬ 
erest were taken into account. 

Rajitrack executives refuse 
to commit the group 10 a simil¬ 
ar full-scale link. A board 
meeting on Thursday is expec¬ 
ted to agree to a low-cost plan 
10 be put to John Prescon, the 
Deputy Prime Minister. 

Gerald Corbett, Raifrrack'5 
chief executive, said: “It is our 
job to come up with opportuni¬ 
ties for the Government which 
arc commercially feasible. 
These are huge sums of money 
for a relatively small benefit. 
We have come up with a solu¬ 
tion for the Government, but if 
the Government wants to run 
with it, ir is up to them." 

However, a move to scale 
down the high-speed section to 
little over 40 miles will bring 
opposition from the business 
community which has pressed 
for a link to St Pan eras to re¬ 
generate parts of East London 
and ensure links with other 
pans of the rail network. It 
would not even reach Ebbs- 
fleet, the station that was ex- 


succeed in 









By Alasdadi Murray, economics correspondent 


ers at the bank’s annua] 
meeting-bn April 22- - 
Mike Blackburn, chief 
executive off.the Halifax, 
has said be .would have no 
quahns about a-- special 
dividend or share buyback. 

in the absence of a suitable 
. acquisition. . But Affiance & 
Leicester says It would pre¬ 
fer to use -its surplus to 
finance organic growth of. 
au acquisition. . 

Comroentaiy, page 29 


HIGH street sales bounced 
bade in January after a mixed 
Christmasasshofpersnjshed 
to pick up bargains in the 
winter sales. 

The British Retail Consor¬ 
tium sales monitor for Janu¬ 
ary, published today, shows 
sales growth running at its 
highest monthly levels since 
August 1996. •• 

. However, the underlytng 
rate of growth slowed and the 
BRC cautioned that the big 
jump in January safes reflect¬ 
ed conswiter.“price<onscious- 
ness" rather than a return to 

boom additions. ■ ■ . 

.- Inflation fears were also 
eased by producer prices data 
yesterday showing factory- 
gate prices rising at Aerslo^- 
est rate for nearly 12 years. 

High street sales rose at ah 
■ a nnual irate of 6.1 par cent last 
month, compared with 43 per 
cent in December. However, 
fiie quarterly growth rale fell 
to 4 per cent from 4.7 per cent 
at foe same paint last year: 

’ Andrew Higginson. chair¬ 
man of fiie BRC economic aff¬ 
airs committee, said:- “Un¬ 
doubtedly customers are 
becoming more bargain-con¬ 
scious and are waiting for fire 


sales before buying/* Factory- 
gate prices showed no month¬ 
ly increase in January, push¬ 
ing fiie annual rate of grow* 
; down from 1 per cent to 0.7 per 
cent, file lowest rise since mid- 
1996.. The subdued data fol¬ 
lowed another fall in oil prices 
which pushed raw material 
prices 9.7 per cent lower than 
at the same stage last year. 

The fall in producer prices 
— which bodes well for the 
retail inflation figures today — 
failed to cheer the markets. 
The FTSE100 declined by 283 
points to 5.600.9 after a bout of 
profit taking. 

Fund managers, however, 
remain bullish about foe out¬ 
look for the market, according 
to the Merrill lynch/Gallup 
monthly survey. Buyers of UK 
equities outnumbered sellers 
by the largest amount since 
rrad-1995, with the FTSE 100 
particularly favoured. The 
survey showed that fund man¬ 
gers are running down then- 
high cash levels which should 
provide further support for the 
market. Institutions arc also 
returning to the troubled mar¬ 
kets in Asia, with stocks in 
Hong Kong and Thailand 
especially back in favour. 







■ 


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Robert Ayling, who has discussed the alliance at the US Embassy, was upbeat about its future 


Bid-target Argos recruits chief who cannot lose 


; \ By FrasekNslson 

STUAkn^E^^^ executive of a 

large part the Buxton retafong .empire, 
has been recruited to defend Argos against 
the £L$ bSEon Md launched, by Great 
Universal Stores- He stands to gam 
L540OT if foe catalogue retaBer falls to a 
takeover at ariy pcant in fiw next two years. 


Mr Rose said: “I have turned down two 
other job offiacs id accept this one, and I 
think only fair and proper that if 1 would 
lose ray job then 1 should have compensa¬ 
tion. I've dropped everything to be available 
toArgosC and 1 would not have joined if I did 
not think we have a vwy good chance of 
seeing off this tad." 

One senior City source mid: ~I have some 


'sympathy with Argos. Mr Rose is well 
regarded and they badly need a credible 
name as chief executive. In these bid 
situations you need an attractive package to 
win anyone decent." 

Mr Rose has been out of work since 
August, when John Hoemer. chief executive 
.of Burton Group, decided to take sole 
responsibility lor foe Top Shop to Principles 


chain stores after the demerger of 
Dehenhams. He is one of the few top 
managers in UK retail who is immediately 
available. He is being given a £180,000 
golden handshake, and an annual salary of 
£320.000 with pension supplement of 
£40,000. He will receive his foil entitlement 
if Argos succumbs to a takeover bid. 

Argos shares fell 2p to 6l8p yesterday 


after Vendex International, the Dutch retail 
group tipped as potential counter-bidder for 
the company, announced a E5I0 million 
merger with rival KBB. Robert Miller, 
director of retail research at Kleinwort 
Benson, said the deal greatly diminishes the 
chances of a rival bid._ 

Commentary, page 29 



TELEVISION 

AND 

RADIO 

PAGES 

50,51 


peered to serve M25 motorway 
traffic south of foe Thames. 

Railtrack directors are also 
nervous about overcon unit- 
ting the company which also 
has its sights set on taking 
over all or part of the London 
Underground infrastructure, 
which ministers are expected 
to offer to the private sector. 

Mr Prescott is expected to 
unveil plans for both the high¬ 
speed link and London Under¬ 
ground this month. Mr 
Corbett said: “We would not 
want to do something that 
precluded us from foe Tube." 

Railtrack believes that it can 
reduce costs to a third fay 
cutting out expensive funnel¬ 
ling. under the Thames and 
East and North London. Di¬ 
rectors say the shorter route 
would deliver half the planned 
reduction in journey time be¬ 
tween London and Brussels 
and Plaris. The full 68-mile 
fink was expected to reduce 
journeys by 35 minutes. 

Commentary, page 29 


BA lands 
surprise 
charge 
from US 

By Adam Jones 


BRITISH AIRWAYS' third- 
quarter profits fell below 
many analysts’ expectations 
yesterday after a surprise £32 
million charge. 

The airline announced pre¬ 
tax profits of £80 million for 
the three months to December 
31 (E1I3 million). The profits 
were dragged down by £32 
million of late charges from 
General Electric of foe US for 
engine maintenance work. 

BA shares rose 7p to 560p. 
Turnover rose 6.9 per cent 
against the third quarter of 
1996 to £2 billion and BA said 
trading conditions should re¬ 
main favourable. 

The passenger load factor 
fell from 7L2 per .cent to 67.7 
per cent Lower fuel prices 
added E39 million to the 
quarter's profits. BA said the 
airline's efficiency drive wiU 
improve profits by more than 
£200 million this year. 

The strong pound knocked 
£42 million off earnings and a 
£200 million charge is expect¬ 
ed for foe full year. 

BA would not comment an 
the status of its delayed alliance 
with American Airlines, but 
Robert Ayling. chief executive, 
said there was “generally a 
more positive atmosphere about 
alliances" among regulators. 

Tempos, page 30 


Business 

Today 


. STOCK MARKET 
INDICES 

FTSE 100_ 56009 I-28.BJ 

Yiafel. ZS9% 

FTSE All Share _ 2600.77 (-9.16) 

NrkKf*.. 17205.00(+T6< 94) 

Maui V#srlr- 

Dow Jones_ 817390 f-1S.69i* 

S&P Composite 1008.48 (-3 98)' 


j : us rate 

Federal Funds... 5> w %* (&'»%) 

Long Bond_ 102*-* (102‘"i 1 ) 

Yield-. SJ4%* (5.92%) 

„■ . LONDON MONEY 

3-mth Interbank. 7 ,, «% (r.^%) 

Litte tong gilt 

future (Mar). 122"„ (122 3 ,) 


STERLING 


NewYodc 

London: 

dm""7.Z"..™ 

FFr..-. 

SFr... 

Yen...- 

£ Index.. 


1.6345* (1.6435) 

1.6333 (16505) 
29624 (2.9600) 
99313 (9.9217) 
29890 (29897] 
203.09 (203.S8) 
1049 (104.4) 


S« OOU * R 


London: 

DM.. 1.8160* (18090) 

FFr_ 69887* (6.0615) 

SFr_ 1.4647* (1.45831 

Yen_ 124.17* (12397) 

Slnde*_ 108.1 (107.3) 

Tokyo dose Yen 124.72 

‘ NORTH SEA OIL •• 

■JSfc'-J...-.:/ .• . 

Brent 15-day < Apr) $1590 (S15.45) 


London dose_ $30195 (S298.45) 

• denotes midday trading pries 


Departing 
GGT head 
seeks £9m 
damages 

By Jason Niss£ 


FRANK ASSUMMA. the ad¬ 
vertising executive who pre¬ 
sided over the collapse of 
GGT Group’s New York 
agency, is suing the group for 
$14.6 million (about £9 
million). 

The action, served on 
GGTs New York business. 
Wells BDDP, late last week, 
demands $2-6 million for 
breach of contract. $10 million 
for loss of future earning 
power and $2 million “exem¬ 
plary damages for alleged 
intentional defamation". 

Mr Assumma was replaced 
as president of Wells BDDP 
last month after the firm lost 
$80 million of work from 
Procter & Gamble, the US 
consumer goods group. P&G 
was said to be unhappy about 
the departure of three senior 
executives who fell out with 
Mr Assumma. 

The P&G defection prompt¬ 
ed a 40 percent drop in GGTs 
share price and led its chair- 
'man, Mike Greenlees, to 
agree a £143 million takeover 
bid from Omnicom, the US 
marketing services group. 

The legal action is disclosed 
in Omnicom's offer docu¬ 
ment, which also reveals that 
Mr Greenlees is on a contract 
paying a basic salary of 
£500.000 and a potential 
bonus of up to £400,000. He, 
and Jean-Marie Dru. who 
runs GGTs French opera¬ 
tions. are to take up senior 
posts with Omnicom follow¬ 
ing the takeover, and they 
have been offered five-year 
contracts. 

City Diary, page 31 



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28 BUSINESS NEWS 


THE TIMES TUESDAY FEBRUARY 301998 


Tobacco firms seek release of cigarette papers 


From Oliver August 

IN NEW YORK 


BROWN & WILLIAMSON, the BAT subsid¬ 
iary. and three other US tobacco companies are 
pressing a judge in their billion-doUar legal 
battle with US authorities to release 33 million 
pages of their internal documents. 

The papers are known to include damaging 
and sensitive information, some of which has 
leaked out in recent weeks. By releasing the 
documents together, the Tobacco companies 
want to stop the drip feed of stories about 
targeting teenagers and cheating on nicotine 


levels. The $368.5 billion (E219 billion) settle¬ 
ment that would give the com patties immunity 
from class action suits is still awaiting 
congressional approvals, 

Hubert Humphrey IU, the attorney-general 
of Minnesota, where the documents are held, 
said: “Unfortunately, it’s just another public 
relations ploy by this outlaw industry that is 
desperately seeking immunity from Congress." 

The companies are also asking the judge to 
open to the public the warehouse in which the 
documents are held. The four companies 
promised to pay any extra costs. 

BAT, a defendant in its own right has 


declined to join the effort to release the 
documents. 

The latest piece of confidential information 
emerging from the documents concents the so- 
called “secret of Marlboro". The Philip Morris 
brand established its market dominance in the 
mid-1970s, much to the astonishment of its 
rivals. David Bemick, a Brown & Williamson 
lawyer, said: “We couldnT figure out why 
Marlboro sales were taking off." 

Brown & Williamson took more than a 
decade to find out that Marlboro sales were 
powered by the addition of ammonia to the 
tobacco. A1989 Brown & Williamson document 


in The Minnesota warehouse states: "The secret 
of Marlboro is ammonia.” 

Mr Bemick has played dawn suggestions 
that the main reason for adding ammonia is to 
boost nicotine levels to keep smokers hooked. 
He has played up the industry^ position that 
ammonia results in a better-tasting, smoother 
smoke. “Where do die companies compete?" he 
asked. ’They compete for that great-tasting 
cigarette that people will like." 

Ammonia apparently reacts with sugars in 
the tobacco to give Marlboro a “roasty. toasty" 
flavour—one reason other companies pursued 
the technology. 


Investors 
may sue for 
Astec payout 


By Martin Barrow 


TWO institutional investors 
in Astec (BSR) are consider¬ 
ing legal action against Emer¬ 
son Electric. Astec's 
controlling shareholder, 
which is hying to remove 
independent executive direc¬ 
tors from the board and to 
block dividend payments. 

Electra Fleming and Royal 
SunAiiianoe are considering 
issuing proceedings against 
Emerson under section 459 of 
the Companies Act which 
allows a shareholder to com¬ 
plain to the High Court when 
it is believed me company's 
affairs are bring conducted to 
the detriment other 
shareholders. 

A total of 18 instititions. 
speaking for about 25 per cent 
of Astec, have protested 
against the move by Emerson, 
an American company which 
owns 51 per cent or Astec. 
Emerson has said it will pay 
IIIp a share for the shares it 
does not already own. 

The shares rose 2p to I26p 
yesterday after Astec. which 
makes power converters for 
the computer and telecom¬ 
munications industries, re¬ 
ported a rise in pre-tax profits 
to £372 million from £33.9 
million for the year to Decem¬ 
ber 31. Earnings rose to 9.4lp 
a share from &55p. 



Institutional shareholders in revolt Mike Arrowsmith. finance director of Astec, where pre-tax profits rose to £37m 


Tempos, page 30 


TDUQIST jRATES 


Australia S ...... 

Austria Sch .... 

Belgium Fr_ 

CanadaS_ 

Cyprus Cypc . 

Danmark Kr _ 
FWnnd Mkk _ 

France Fr- 

Germany Dm . 

Gieece Dr_ 

Hong Kong 5 

Iceland —. 

Ireland PI _ 

Israel Shk- 

Italy Lira- 

Japan Yen_ 

Mafia--- 

Nettwide Gld 
New Zealand S 

Norway Kr_ 

Portugal Esc - 
S Africa Rd — 

Spain Pta- 

Sweden Kr_ 

Switzerland Fr 

Turkey Lira_ 

USAS. 


Bank 

Buy. 

2.53 
21.83 
64.31 
2.470 
0314 
1188 

8.53 
10.39 

3.13 


13.48 

130 

1.23 

626 

3103 

218.13 

0.682 

3529 

225 

1255 

31553 

8L74 

26229 

14.08 

2.54 

370360 

1.742 


Bank 
Seta 
255 
20.17 
58JS 
2282 
0842 
1059 
8.78 
951 
258 
456 
1228 
110 
1.15 
5.61 


200.60 

0523 

3234 

2.71 

1201 

29350 

7.78 

243.50 

1226 

2-33 

350482 

1599 


Bales for small denomination bank notes 
only as suppfed by Barclays Bank PIC. 
Orfterert rales apply to travetar’s 
cheques. Rales as at dose at tradkig 
yesterday 


Utility regulators to 
face tighter controls 


By Christine Buckley, industrial correspondent 


UTILITY regulators will face 
tighter controls cm how they 
determine companies’ profits 
in an effort to make their often 
controversial derisions more 
consistent 

The Government will set out 
a framework for regulators to 
work within in its Green 
Paper on utility regulation, 
which is due to be published at 
the end of this month. 

The Green Paper that will 
confirm the widely tipped 
merger of the electricity and 
gas regulators, will aim to 
map out common methods for 
regulation, such as guidelines 
for calculating the cost of 
capital. 

While this will be seen by 
some as tying the hands of the 
regulators, which are intend¬ 
ed to be independent of Gov¬ 
ernment, the Department of 
Trade and Industry will make 
clear that more consistency is 
needed in regulation. A more 


coherent approach to regula¬ 
tion across the industries will 
be welcomed by die City and 
the companies which have 
often complained of idiosyn¬ 
cratic derision making among 
the regulators. 

The styles of Stephen 
Littlechild. the electricity 


watchdog; Clare Spottis¬ 
woode. foe gas regulator; and 
Ian Byart. foe wafer regulator, 
differ considerably and the 
Government is anxious to 
depersonalise the regulatory 
process. 

Rows over pricing regimes 
between the companies and 



Spottiswoode public rows Littlechild: controversial 


regulators have often descend¬ 
ed into personal slanging 
matches and have lea to 
uncertainty in the market 

But while the regulators are 
expected to be forced to make 
derisions more consistent and 
transparent they are also like¬ 
ly to toughen future price 
reviews in foe faoeof consider¬ 
able profits earned by electric¬ 
ity and water companies. Hie 
City believes that companies 
will be hit hard by foe next 
round of water and electricity 
distribution reviews. 

The DTI is not expected to 
appoint either Professor 
Littlechild or Ms Spottiswoode 
to the role of supenregulator. 
It is thought that the job will 
be advertised as a new pos¬ 
ition as the Government 
moves quickly to fuse the two 
offices. Ms Spotriswoode*s 
contract finishes at the end of 
this year. Professor 
Littlechild’s ends next year. 


Johnson 

Matthey 

doubles 

silver 


output 


From Oliver August 

IN NEW YORK 


JOHNSON MATTHEY, the 
London metal refiner, has 
doubled silver production in 
recent weeks in response to a 
nine-year price high. 

The company said: “It’s not 
Just us. There is an increase in 
silver refining around foe 
world.” 

The price for an ounce of 
silver fell 35 per cent to $655 
yesterday after felling 6 per 
cent on Friday. Rising world¬ 
wide refinery output and a 
slowdown in underlying de¬ 
mand for the metal is calling 
into question the wisdom of 
Warren Buffett’s $1 billion 
silver investment Mr Buffett 
started buying silver at $4 per 
ounce in July, citing a short¬ 
age of supply. 

John Fairley, an operations 
manager, said: “Silver is com¬ 
ing in from everywhere to be 
radted into bars. A combina¬ 
tion of the high price and the 
high lease rate is causing 
everyone to try to get their 
silver into the market” 

Johnson Maithty has ex¬ 
tended working hours to run 
its plants around foe dock and 
at weekends. Colin Griffith, 
head of precious metal trading 
at Standard Bank, said: “I 
don’t think these prices are 
sustainable. There is a lot of 
metal that is sitting around in 
undeliverable form but is 
being refined so that it can be 
brought to market There are 
producers who are happy to 
sell future production at well 
below current prices." 

The biggest threat feared by 
traders sitting on large silver 
positions is that India, the 
largest silver importer, could 
become a net exporter. 

Indian exports in the late 
1970s undermined the attempt 
by the Hunt brothers to corner 
the silver market. Demand in 
India is already fading and 
scrap and silverware are 
being melted down for export. 

In Bombay yesterday people 
were selling family silver to 
cash in on strong silver prices. 


Tempos, page 30 


Who won 
what and why? 


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Allsport founders 
to pocket millions 


By Jason Niss£ 


TWO of Britain's best known 
sports photographers are to 
become multimillionaires as a 
result of the £29.4 million 
purchase of Allsport, foe pho¬ 
tographic agency, by Getty 
Communications. 

Steve PfcweU, who was one 
of the three founders of foe 
agency in foe 1970s. will make 
nearly £15 million, while Adri¬ 
an Murrell, foe cricket photog¬ 
rapher who is now Allsport's 
UK managing director, is to 
make 3bout E4.4 million from 
foe sale. Six other directors 
will share about £10 million 
from the deal. 

However foe two other 
founders of Allsport — John 
Starr and Tony Duffy — both 
left foe agency while it was 
being built up and sold their 


shares for much less than the 
price secured from Getty. Mr 
Duffy, who had been building 
up foe firm’s presence in foe 
US. sold his 40 per cent stake 
in 1995 for a fraction of foe 
price it was worth yesterday. 

Getty is paying £3&_5 million 
in cash and £12.9 million in 
shares for the business, which 
had a turnover of £10 million 
and pre-tax profits of £13 
million last year. 

Allsport is one of the leading 
sports photography agencies. 
It supplies images to most of 
foe leading newspapers in the 
world, Mr Powell is currently 
in Nagano. Japan, coordinat¬ 
ing the media coverge of the 
Winter Olympics, where 
Allsport has 45 staff and 25 
freelance photographers. 


Storm damage 
bill of £300m 


By Marianne Curphey, insurance correspondent 


SHARES in Royal & Sun- 
Alliance fell 6 p to 690p yester¬ 
day after foe composite insur¬ 
er revealed it had suffered £52 
million worth of losses from 
storms last December. 

The figure was about £12 
million higher than analysts’ 
estimates and included losses 
in the Irish Republic and 
Europe. The UK accounted for 
£40 million of the lass. 

Guardian Royal Exchange 
did not make an official state¬ 
ment but said its exposure to 
the December storms was 
about £5 million, with a fur¬ 
ther £10 million from last 
month’s bad weather which 
swept across foe South West of 
England. Its shares fell IS* 2 p 
V>3S&hp. 

The Association of British 


Insurers estimated the total 
cast of the storms at foe end of 
last year could be as high as 
£300 million. 

Profits for die insurance 
industry as a whole in J997 are 
likely to be volatile. 

When GRE announced its 
purchase of PPP healthcare 
group last December it said 
trading conditions in the UK 
were tough, particularly 
among large commercial 
property losses and these 
would be reflected, in the 1997 
figures. 

GRE. Commercial Union 
and Prudential will report 

1997 results on February 25, 
and RSA on March 5. 

CU has not given details of 
storm losses but they are not 
thought to be as high as RSA%. 



f eun-r . ■ - 

Shell wins approval 
for two gasfields 

. annmval to 




afcSSS^HS 

form part ofShdl and Esso’s aim to fovest£4Wl^m the 
seSemand central Nor* Sc? over the next ^ 

“Ketch and Corvette's combined peak ■ represents 

. - r nr demand. S 


TlKSaiStt combined peak ■»"- "2"?? 

Shell/Esso Schooner field. Thefirst gas tssch^ufodto Cot. 
. , __ moo Th* f 8 f) million Corvette field 


Shell/Esso Schooner field. Thefirstgas g* 

in the fourth quarter of 1999. The 

lies 50 miles north east of Bacton on the north Norfolk coast 


Guardian IT flotation 


THE flotation of Guardian iT next month will make 
millionaires out of seven directors and senior managers and 
value shares and options held by Peter MacLean..auef 
executive, at about £5 million. Guardian, foe provider of 
emergency back-up computer systems, y^erday amfomed 
its plans to float It will be valued at about DQO ntflhon. 
Guardian was framed in 1991 by [CL and Sherwood, and sold 
for £21 million in 1995 to a management buyout team. 


New role for Stevens 


LORD STEVENS of Ludgate, chairman of United News & 
Media, has become chairman of Personal Num ber C om- 
pany. which provides memorable telephone numbers and 
tdecaronmnications services to business and private users. 
He succeeds John Pfiett who has resigned after _his 
appointment as an executive consultant to a US corporaHc©- 
Mr Feett remains a non-executive director of Personal 
Number. The shares rose 3kp to 41tep yesterday. 


Hyundai halts work 


HYUNDAI, the Korean electronics company, has suspended 
work at its new site in Dunfermline. Fife., for four months. 
The deday, which is expected to affect hundreds of jobs, has 
been caused by the financial turmoil in the Far East and 
could put die entire project at risk. Hyundai said: “The 
rescheduling of foe affected work packages — far aperiod of 
up to four months —will take effect front later today and is a 
result of continuing economic difficulties in Korea." 


GTI sale considered 


TELEMETRIX. the troubled electronic components group, 
said that a committee of investment bankers has been 
appointed to deride whether to sell GTI Corporation, its loss- 
making US subsidiary. The board of GTI has appointed 
Cowen&Co to consider a number of strategic possibilities. In 
1996 GTI made an operating loss of about £5 mfllion. Tun. 
Curtis, chief executive of Telexnetrix. said that he does not 
expect a derision to be made within the next few weeks. 


Test success lifts Ramco 


SHARES in Ramco Energy jumped Zlhp to 727hp yesterday af¬ 
ter it announced that Medusa Oil and Gas. its sufaskfiary, had 
successfully completed the drilling and initial testing of its 
Krumvir 2 wefl in the Czech Republic The wdl was drilled as 
part of a joint-venture with MND, foe receady privatised Czech 
oflandgas company. Steve Renip. chairman arid driefexecutive 
of Ramco, sahtThis discovery has given Ramco entryinto a 
region where ofl and gas discoveries can be quickly developed.'' 


Sericol inks £9m boost 


BURMAH CASTROL’S chemicals arm is to spend £9 million 
on expanding Sericol. its screen printing inks business, by 
buying the screen division business of Sicpa Australia and 
Serigrafia in Austria. Sericol Is also to form subsidiaries in 
Poland and the Czech Republic. Lee Flutshack. chief executive 
of Burraah* Screen Printing Inks, said: “The acquisitions add 
to those made in 1997 in Britain, Australia and foe US, and will 
advance Sericol’s worldwide leadership in the industry. ”' - 


S alvesen wins contract 


SHARES in Christian Salvesen rose frciih Http to 118p alter foe 
transport group said it bad won a £20 million contract to operate 
fleea’s first British distribution centre. The furniture group’s new 
warehouse af Thrapston near Kettering. Northamptonshire, wfli 
save right British stores and service centres and is espected to 
become operational tins autumn. Bcea plans further store 
openings in Britain. It has a total of 144 stores in 25coun tries and. 
says Britain is its fastest growing market. 


Euro therm buys in US 


is to 
Jfor 


EUROTHERM, the controls and instruments 
buy Action Instruments, based in San Diego, California^ for 
$16 million {£9JJ million) subject to approval by the American 
anti-trust authorities. Action designs* makes and sells 
industrial signal conditioning products. Action sales for foe 
year to end October were $l&4million and profit before tax$i 
million- The value of net assetsto be acquired is $53 millio n. 
Eurothenn shares fefl 16*2 ptD357 1 ap. 


Nortftamber shares slip 


SHARES in Northamber, the computer assembly group, fell 
from 255p to Zff tp after the group revealed a 145 percent rise 
m.pre-tax profits to £426million irtlhe six months to December 
31. Sales rose 8 per cent to £150 miltfon, earnings rose bom 7.9p 
to 8.4p and foe half-year dividend doubles to L2p. David 
Phillips, the chamnan, said: These results were achieved 

deSDile the disinnnmtmpnt m _r .1_li. . 


j- . aauevea 

despite the disappointment m preGfarirtinas saterofihe older 
technology PCs m foe general UK retail marketplace." . 


Pierre Victoire placed 
on the menu at £15m 


is* 

■Sit 

+?. 

-n 

■m 


Sttr- 


** 

: ;1 


m 

m 

a* 

<*4 

m 


: 

m 

= r*« 

./I 


dm 

»*i 

'tm 





[155m 

le of 




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ter's 


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un s 



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*es m 


trrim 


By Jason Nissfi 


PIERRE VICTOIRE. the res¬ 
taurant chain which has twice 
pulled plans to float on AIM. 
has been put up for sale with a 
price tag of about £15 million. 

Rutherford Manson Dowds, 
foe Scottish accountancy firm, 
has been given the sale man¬ 
date. The operation, which has 
more than 130 outlets across 
the UK and Europe, was 
founded ten years ago by 
Pierre LeVicky, the French 
chef who is still the largest 
shareholder. 

However, a series of finan¬ 
cial setbacks and a raw with 
franchisees have dampened 


plans to float foe group. The 
management team has been 
strengthened with the ap¬ 
pointment of Bryan Rankin, a 
leading accountant as chair¬ 
man and a change of auditors. 

This has not stopped the 
group from running into con¬ 
troversy. Neatly £1 million was 
ten! to a company controlled 
by M LeVicky and used to 
renovate a French farmhouse. 
Pierre Vfctoire nearly col¬ 
lapsed in the early 1990s, but 
M LeVicky is now looking for 
someone to take control and 
lads plans to expand foe chain 
to 300 outlets. 



LeVicky. largest shareholder 




withdrawal from 



. • r- 


to 


NATWEST BANK yesterday 
completed its withdrawal 
from the equities market with 
the sale of its Australasian 
businesses to Salomon Smith 
Barney, tbe US investment 
banking group. 

Salomon said It had agreed 
to pay A$13P million (£52 
million) for County NatWesfs 
Australian and New'Zealand 
operations, including corpo¬ 
rate finance, equities and 
parts of the financial markets- 
division. 

The price r epr e sents a small 
premium to the net assets sold 
and contains an element 


linked to firture profits. The 
deal is eiqiected tobeeamptet- 
ed by-foe .end of the current 
quarter.. 

About 400 staff wffl transfer 
from County NatWest fo foe. 
new combined operations, of 
Salomon Smith-Barney^Si* 
fralra. leaving 4Q employees-in 
the financial mariorts'drvison. 

The dealcomes after testra- 
tegK decisian by NaiWest to.- 
puffout of riefeal equities. In - 
December it sold its UK and . 
European equities' and deriva-' 
live operations: to Bankers 
Trtwt and Deutsche Morgan . 
Grenfell- - for .. • £ 179 ' 


^“lllOT-SakjniQCL owrasd-by ^ 
Travelers, foe US financial 
serviced-group, said-that foe' . 
ac quisi tion brought, to if* fold - 
Australia's top^anked equV 
.ties brokfiraas house anti' a., 

teaia of frigfoty rated ^search: • 

anafysts.>'' 

Robert Morse, chief , exeep- ^. 
tive officer^ of SalrarunL.Sriiifo ’* 
“totety Asia‘-Pacific; xaW-Anff- 
tralia andNew Zeatand repre- — 
„senod ingxiriam -foaTkets' in 
; gg ^qbal seairitfes buaness. --- 
j™-St .George, Comity 
NafWesrs framer CEO- Wfll 
head foe comlfowd Safornbn - 
. f^>eration._ ' *'r 























■L Eb Ri 


i 


, THE TIMES TUESDAY FEBRUARY 101998 


BUSINESS NEWS 29 


AC? i_A *. ..*■ A 

: £ 

* • r-4i"..;. ^aL 




niTn o(aii 0 


'i. 


'■■ *-■■ .-. ■;'n=>W 

“ '-** . •” 

- —. 


J ohn Prescott's "brief is M '*& 
hard -choices. Nome are. 
starker - Sian :■ ■ the -.. options 

presorted-ty . fife Wore of 

London- & QintmentalRaSways 
to fund its promised high-speed 
rail link to ^ 

The ea^; option. is allowing 
LCR’S assets, : wfeidi : rttdude 
track, vasf ; tondcm pr operties 
and file Eurostat serVK& to fold 
back into die public'seder. But 
that: sotre$ ; 'fiotfung:~ Gordon 
Brown will not finance the JhfiL 
Rated?toofor to be fix only 
oiganhatiw that can : salvage 

Berfrtel, 

shamed shareholders, 'are still 
hoping to prosper on the-new 
prmaMtft bade fc.answering , 
the call however.Rmltrack faces 
two p roblems. . 

LCR’S- failure' confirmed the 
convictkn of many 1 others that 
the project was uiKcononric, even ■ 
allowing for the huge cadi-and 
asset subsidies the Tory Govern¬ 
ment agreed to. And Raiftrack 
has other prioriti es. Number one 
is ro extend the businessrtkDCHVs 
takiijg over and refurbishing 
the infragtnxsujfe of London- 
Chidergrtwnd, preferably in case. 

. lor. That is, one of Air Prescott's 
priorities too: V.; .v . - - 
If Raihtack does not win a 


go down the Tube 


down. Much of the benefit in 

■ tarns of fene and convenjenpe 
an be won at much lower cost 
Tor Mr Prescott, however, fids 
could be painful. HeWantstnput 
as much freight on- to rail as 
possible and to link the Channel 
l^innd better to fiw North. Ypf 
much of the avoidable cost is on 
fite urban and cross-Thames 
tunnels needed for the fancy 


COMMENTARY 

by our City Editor 


fVfc** r*«. If Eaihradr does not-win ja 

IOr Stevens ffiSajS 


■“— v !r,a pru-rt,' 

' * •. .-r.r 

*■ - • J 4 V 

i halts work 

-: t • "-’-rs- 

r j : _ . ; Urb; 

*. „ •’ - 4i -yl* 

* a-sfc- 

considered 

;: . ■■■■. 

-V"; ’ 

*ss lifts Ramo 

■ • 1 •r>n 

'' V•':'!* 1 

>'“■ ■ ■■ tier 

!• ... - 

. t jp 

iks £9m boos 

.. -v.W 

., ■ ;...irah. 

• - iisrf® 


wins contract 


... .£»’*"■ 
• •* 


m buvs in ^ * 

• • .!.. -.'S'-' 

.• : —5,ri 

shares slip 


it wiU not fed anxiotis to hefp oat 
Mr Prescott an the high meed 
link. If it doesi, it wfflwpny about 
being financially overstretched 
by a double co mmi tment. .. 

The.sensihle answer, as ; saig- 


in northeast Ixjodon that 
flas transport gain possiHe. 

RaiUradc can ■ envisage a 
scaled-down U3 billion prcgect 
shat would speed passengers 
from Londcai to Paris nearly as 
fast as LCR and Enrotnnnel, its 
.biggest customer, were- banking 
on. But that would keep the 
passenger station at Waterloo, in 
South London, and- terminate 
freiehtin north Kent That^would' 
not mifD Mr Precoffs dream of 
through-freight but would at 
least be convenient for transfers 
from the 

Unfefftonatdy; common sense 
carries littte we^ht in Brussels. 
The scaleikdown version, which 
LCR would have loved, is not in 
the legjsZatiocL The-EU, spurred 
by continental contractors, might 
be able to fiacce Mr Prescott to go 
back to the drawing board, or at 


least to a new open tender. The 
classic eurofudge would be for 
Mr Prescott to presold that the 
scaled-down prefect is stage one 
of the grand design and to offer 
some hapless group, such as UK 
fishermen or consumers, as a 


- The future of Eurostar is easier 
to resolve. Mr Prescott could 
keep it^in public ownership but 
allow Richard Branson to run it 
ah a non-profit contract to make 
up for missing the lottery. 

Cuckoo! I hear 
a windfall 

I t had to come, like the first 
cuckoo of spaing, the first 
flicker of concern about file 
growth prospects of the “new * 1 
banks — thafs the former build¬ 
ing societies to you and rae^— has 
arrived. However such is the 
environment that has seen the 
likes of Halifax and Northern 
Rock outperform almost every¬ 


one in their short lives as public 
companies, that the warning 
from Salomon Smith Barney is 
sugar-coated with suggestions 
that Halifax, Woolwich and AUi- 
anoe & Leicester could return £1.7 
milium to shareholders this year. 

John Leonard and the wonder- 
fully named Ronii Ghose at 
Salomon argue that the new 
banks have much more captial 
than they could ever need to fulfil 
their statutory requirements. 
After all the lion’s share of their 
business comes from mortgage 
lending — which, barring an 
economic meltdown of Indo¬ 
nesian proportions, is a rather 
secure way of making money. So, 
as Tong as the Halifax does rat 
decide it wants to start financing 
Latin American economic 
growth or tunnelling for rail¬ 
ways, it can work with quite low 
capital ratios. 

This argument is a simplified 
version of that used by the did 
banks — NaiWest and Barclays 
— to justify their share buybacks 


a couple of years ago. Then 


the clearing banks did not have 
the spare capital, they could not 
waste money buying banks in 
New England or lending to 
Medco of financing Eurotunnel 

The prospect erf another cash 
windfall for the millions of small 
investors who have found their 
family finances transformed by 
the demutualisation derby is 
mouthwatering. But it wiU do 
littte: for the earnings of the new 
banks concerned or indeed their 
share prices. The mechanism for 
handing this money out to 
shareholders is quite likely to 
either be bad for me tax position 
of the man in the street or 
structured in a way that alienates 
institutional investors. 

However it may mask the 
worry that the actual flow of 
business coming to the new 
banks could be curing up. They 
all enjoyed a flood of deposits 
ahead of demutualisation — but 


if you had £ 1,000 to spare today 
you are more likely to put it in a 
Safeway savings account paying 
73 per "cent interest rather than 
Halifax Liquid Gold paying 
somewhat less. 

Although some say share buy¬ 
backs are the last resort of a 
management without imagina¬ 
tion, it is a better prospect than 
overpaying for a life assurer. 

Flemings a victim 
of circumstances 

R ecently the venerable mer¬ 
chant bank. Robert Flem¬ 
ing, purchased large 
amounts of advertising space to 
publicise its “global capability" 
in completing transactions for 
diems. Honings highlighted the 
flotation of Billiton, the mining 
group that leapt straight into the 
FTSE100 last year. But investors 
will not thank Flemings for the 
float, as the shares have fallen 
nearly 40 per cent, thanks to the 
collapse of commodity prices. 

Of course, Flemings would say 
that Billiton has been a victim of 
circumstances beyond its control. 
But that comment could just as 
easily be applied to Flemings 
itself. A couple of years ago 
everyone thought Flemings was 


brilliantly placed to exploit the 
booming "tiger” economies 
through its joint venture, Jardine 
Fleming. Now these tigers are in 
retreat. Fleming b wandering 
where its growth is coming from. 

In fund management, Flem¬ 
ings is no longer the force it was 
aria Save & Prosper, its retail 
brand, is looking lacklustre. The 
London corporate finance opera¬ 
tion cannot decide whether it 
wants to take on the big boys, or 
dine well on their scraps, d la 
Close Brothers. And with Jardine 
Fleming it is also caught between 
iwd stools. If you have faith in the 
Far East, now would be the time 
to strike. To raise the money to 
buy Jardine Matheson’s stake, 
Flemings would need to raise 
capital from outside its existing 
shareholder base. The best way 
to do this would be a flotation, 
but that is not something Flem¬ 
ings is ready to countenance at 
the moment. 

Bargain at Argos 

PAYING £580,000 to Stuart Rose 
for what could be just 60 days' 
work seems a Iitue rich. But 
Argos would be dead in the 
water rrying to fight an aggres¬ 
sive takeover bid without a chief 
executive. Rose may nor have 
enjoyed a brilliant reputation at 
Burton, but if the only thing he 
achieves is to persuade GUS to 
pay 25p a share more chan it was 
going to offer, then Argos 
shareholders will have made a 
£137,000 profit on the deal. 


UP 


stake 


By Raymond SnoPdy, media editor 


PEARSON. - the-meefia and 
information group, yesterday 
realised a book proft of more 
than £135 million by selling 
its stake in SES, the Luxem¬ 
bourg operator of the Astra 
satellitetelevision system.' 

fearsan; 'which has - em¬ 
barked on a policy of seffing 
minority stakes m businesses 
that it cannot amtxriU sold its 
7.6 per cent ettmarmestake in 
SES for £160 miOiatL The 
stake was on ffearsoo’s books, 
ar £23 rmllioa and was the 
• •.-: ' -J.y: 


result of an original £7 mil¬ 
lion investment in the satel¬ 
lite venture by Thames 
Television. Analysts have in 
recent months been valuing 
Pearson’s SES stake in "the 
region of £115 mflfiocL : 

The sale values SES, 
whose main shareholders in¬ 
clude Luxembourg-financial 
institutions and Deutsche 
Telekom, at .more , than £2 
billion. . . ' 

.. . From tune to time the 
possibility ~af a flotation has 
.■ i 1 -. i::'- jt-.. • * 


bin 


in 


By Kathy Dpaxu 


FOSTERS Brewing Group, 
the Australian brewer, lifted 
pretax profit 17J percent to 
A$283 ndlfioa (EI16 nriffionj 
ta file six months to Decem¬ 
ber 31; in- spite of kisses 
indnredJn Aria. 

Losses in Asia deepened 
to A$2L6 mfifiou, marc than 
doable the A$I0.2 nuffian 
loss^recorded in the first half 
last time. 7 . 

- Foster's '. net profit of 
A$lfl7JB mflbon for the peiv 
kid was lower than the 
previous corresponding 



Kunkefcnotpessnnxstk: 


half's A$169.4 imflion but 
-was much better than ana¬ 
lysts’expectations of about 
A$150 million. The group's 
tax bfll also jumped signifi¬ 
cantly from A$ll million to 
A$58iniIliO(L 
Ted Kankd, chief execu¬ 
tive, said the result was a 
good one with its Mfldara 
Blass wine business record¬ 
ing a 55.7 per cent rise in 
earrings before interest 
and tax to A&52 million. 

Gazfton United Brewer- 
ies,'Foster’s Australian and 
■New Zealand division, inc¬ 
reased its share of the beer 
-'.market to 55JJ percent from 
‘ 549per cent and raised pre- 
; tax earnings 15J3 per cent to 
A$2I7.1 million- Mr Kunkd 
.. tfid «« expect the group’s 

perfonnance in Asia to wor¬ 
sen In the second haK. 

Foster’s sales were 153 
per cent stronger at A$I-58 
billion and earnings per 
share increased 11 per cent 
to 9.6 -cents per share. The 
interim dividend is five 
cents a share fully franked 
(tax paid) compared with 
an unfranked dividend of 
five cents last time- 


been considered for. SES but 
there is no sign of a date 
being set SES. which broad¬ 
casts saleUate ielevisi on chan¬ 
nels all over Europe, is 
tomorrow expected to unveil 
a new generation of satellites. 

The sale of the SES stake 
demonstrates just bow big a 
bargain Pearson got when it 
bought Thames Television, 
which had lost its broadcast¬ 
ing licence, from what was 
then Thom EMI for £100 
mfllioo in 19% The Thames 
television production busi¬ 
ness and programme library 
are still part' of Pearson 
Tdevision. -' ~ : 

Greg Dyke, the chairman 
and chief executive of Pear¬ 
son Television, said yester¬ 
day that foe sale “was in line 
with our strategy erf dispos¬ 
ing of passive broadcasting 
investments which do not 
offer any real advantage to 
our actively managed pro¬ 
duction and distribution 
business". 

The deal takes to £295 
million the amount raised by 
Pearson over the past year 
through the disposal of mi¬ 
nority broadcasting stakes. 
Last February Pearson sold 
its stake in TVB, the Hang 
Kong broadcaster, for £111 
million. Then, in June, it sold 
part of its stake in FJextech, 
the cable and satellite chan¬ 
nel provider, for £24 million. 

In October Pearson ex¬ 
panded in the US production 
market with a £373 million 
all-share acquisition erf AD 
American Communications, 
producers of game shows 
and popular dramas such as 
Baywatch. 

Redundancies are expected 
at All American’s Los Ange¬ 
les operations to reduce over¬ 
heads. However, Ftearson 
insists that it remains com¬ 
mitted to production at All 
American. 

Pearson shares feH 5p yes¬ 
terday to 820 p in a falling 
market. 

Last year Marjorie 
Scardino, the Pbarson chief 
executive, set herself the tar¬ 
get of doubling the value of 
the company within five 
years. 








■i... :• < 




rw- - •.•**<': . .«£ - Sv: v 




David Page, foe PizzaExpress chainnm atthe Wimbledon outlet The company yesterday served up a 49 percent rise in interim protax profits 


PK2AEXPRESS, the high 
street restaurant chain, will 
shortly be opening its doors in 
Moscow, Paris and Cairo, 
and within five years expects 
to have as many restaurants 
overseas as it does in the UK 
(Dominic Walsh writes). 

Franchised units have 
opened recently in Cyprus, 
Delhi and Meribd in the 
French Alps, and sites have 
been identified in Istanbul 
and Abu Dhabi David Page, 
chairman, said: “Fiance alone 
could bear a similar number 
of units to foe UK Overseas 


PizzaExpress puts overseas 
expansion on the menu 


expansion will gradually ac¬ 
celerate to overtake the UK 
within five or six years." 

He said the group’s over¬ 
seas expansion would follow 
the same path as in the UK. 
Initial development would be 
through franchising, but once 
the restaurants were estab¬ 


lished PizzaExpress would 
seek to take a majority stake 
in the franchisee company or 
buy h out 

Mr Page was speaking as 
he unveiled a 49 per cent 
jump in pre-tax profits 10 £9.4 
million in the second half of 
1997, from turnover 55 per 


cent higher at £47.6 million. 
Earnings per share were up 41 
per cent to 10.7p and an 
interim dividend of l.05p 
(0J85p) will be paid on April 6 . 

The figures were boosted by 
a full contribution from foe 32 
franchised restaurants ac¬ 
quired in the second half of 


19% and foe opening of 15 
new restaurants in the UK 
The chain has more than 150 
restaurants, of which just 
eight are franchises, and it 
continues to expand at the 
rate of about 30 a year. 

Uke-for-tike sales in restau¬ 
rants open for more than 18 
months were 10 per cent 
ahead, although margins 
were held back by a £330,000 
investment in staff and man¬ 
agement to cope with the 
group's rapid expansion. 

Tern pus. page 30 


Reuters to stay silent on 
Grand Juiy investigation 


Sell-out crowds 
fail to lift Celtic 


By Raymond Snoddy, media editor 


By Jason Ntssfe 


REUTERS, the news and in¬ 
formation group, will today 
resist pressure to say more 
about the Grand Jury investi¬ 
gation that the company is 
facing in the US, as it unveils 
its 1997 results. 

The company believes that it 
has already said what it feels it 
is legally able to white the 
investigation continues into 
alleged improper use of pro¬ 
prietary Bloomberg informa¬ 
tion by its US subsidiary, 
Reuters Analytics. 

Reuters is expected today to 
announce its first decline in 
earnings since the organis¬ 


ation became a public com¬ 
pany. The UK group has been 
hit by economic troubles in the 
Far East and by the strength of 
the pound. Analysts expect the 
full-year results to show pre¬ 
tax profits in the £675 million 
to £690 million range. 

The company will be pro¬ 
viding an update on the per¬ 
formance of its 3000 services, 
the likely cost of dealing with 
the millennium bug and the 
effects of the launch of the euro 
on currency dealings. 

All the signs are that foe 
millennium bug will be a 
manageable problem for Reu¬ 


ters, largely because so many 
of the company's machines are 
being modernised all foe time 
in the normal course of busi¬ 
ness. Next week Reuters will 
also return £1-5 billion in cash 
to shareholders through an 
offer of £13.60 in cash and 13 
new shares for every 15 cur¬ 
rently held. 

Last week Reuters sought to 
limit foe scale of the potential 
damage of foe US Grand Jury 
investigation by saying it did 
nor believe foe allegations 
involved breaking into the 
Bloomberg central computer 
and acquiring lines of code. 


CELTIC the Scottish Premier¬ 
ship football club, paid the 
price of success in the first half 
of this financial year, with 
operating profits failing in 
spite of a higher turnover. 

The Glasgow team has been 
enjoying sell-out crowds in foe 
wake of winning foe Scottish 
Coca-Coia cup. This meant 
turnover rose 24 per cent to 
£15.5 million in the six months 
to December 31, but higher 
payments to players and an 
expansion of foe footballing 
squad meant profits from 
operations fell 4 per rent to 
£354 million. 

This strengthening of the 


squad actually had a positive 
effect on foe pre-tax profits 
because — in spite of spending 
E12 million on players — foe 
group made £6-8 million on 
foe transfer market. Taxable 
profits rose from £2.07 million 
to £7.74 million, earnings per 
share jupmed from £6.23 m 
£25.36. There is no dividend. 

Fergus McCann, the dub's 
chairman, said new invest¬ 
ments, such as its superstore, 
and the expanded South West 
Stand, plus the start of an 
independent Premiership in 
Scotland, will cement the 
group's financial 

improvements. 



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30 MARKETS / ANALYSIS 


THE TIMES TUESDAY FEBRU ARY 10199 8 1 * 

--- 


STOCK MARKET. 


MICHAEL CLARK 

Stock Market Writer 
of the Year 


New York (midday): 

Dow Junes_817340 H5.WI 


FTSE surge peters out 
as investors await data 


IT WAS a day of consolidation 
for investors on the London 
stock market that brought to a 
halt a breathtaking run that 
has swept share prices almost 
9 per cent higher in the past 
two weeks. 

The equity market saw an 
early lead wiped our with 
prices continuing to drift 
throughout the afternoon as 
investors kept a wary eye on 
events in New York where the 
Dow Jones industrial average 
opened lower. 

Even so, the FTSE 100 index 
closed above its worst of the 
day. Down almost -40 points at 
one stage, it finished 28.8 
lower at 5,600.9. Turnover 
was a modest 787 million 
shares. 

Dealers said investors were 
waiting lo see the outcome of 
today's retail prices figures 
before committing themselves 
to opening fresh positions. 
There is still plenty of money 
waiting to find its way into the 
market and this combined 
with any fresh corporate activ¬ 
ity should continue to under¬ 
pin sentiment 

Speculative buying lifted 
Cookson 6p to lS9p on turn¬ 
over of 125 million shares. 
Last month the price hit a low 
of 167 bp. leaving the company 
vulnerable to a bid. 

Cable & Wireless stood out 
with a jump of 19p to 632p as 
speculation about rival British 
Telecom reviving merger talks 
began doing the rounds. BT, 
2p firmer at 565p, was being 
linked with a number of 
partners over the weekend but 
as Lehman Brothers conclud¬ 
ed last week there appears to 
be no clear strategy. Other 
brokers say it is still in need of 
a global partner. 

The composite insurers 
were running for cover after 
Royal & SunAlIiance came 
out with storm losses totalling 
E52 million. Credit Lyonnais 
Laing. the broker, reckons we 
have seen the best of the 
general insurers for the time 
being. Commercial Union fell 
15p to E1023, General Am* 
denf 33p to £1285. Guardian 
Royal Exchange I5p at 3Q2p 
and Royal & Sun Ip at 685p. 

Kingfisher, where Sir Geof¬ 
frey Mulcahy is chief execu¬ 
tive, briefly breached the E10 
level for the first time, touch¬ 
ing £10.16 before closing 8p 
better at 995p. Brokers said 
the shares had been marked 
higher along with other retail¬ 
ers in anticipation of a positive 
January report from the Brit¬ 
ish Retail Consortium. Ana¬ 
lysts have been particularly 









- 


mmmm 




km 


Sir Geoffrey Mulcahy saw Kingfisher breach the £10 level 


encouraged by the perfor¬ 
mance of Kingfisher's B&Q 
DIY business which is reck¬ 
oned ro have traded well over 
the Christmas period. 

Meanwhile, last week's £1.6 
billion bid by Great Universal 
Stores. 2’ 2 p easier at 758p, for 
Argos, 2p lighter at 62hp. has 
focused anention on the value 
of other companies in the 
sector. Heals rose 4p to 171 * 2 p, 
Dixons 7 ’j p at 509^ p. Boots 


PAST SELL-BY DATE 

~FTSE350 
food retailers 
Index 


I2p to 905p, DFS Furniture 
3bp to 534p. Hamleys 7p to 
248 > 2pand Next lO'zptoTSOp. 

Body Sbop continued to 
bump along the bottom shed¬ 
ding 1*2 p at L23p as Steen 
Kan ter stepped down as chief 
executive of the group's US 
subsidiary. Dealers say the 
retailer is in danger of losing 
its place as a constituent of the 
FTSE 250. 

One of the biggest falls on 


, /Jmv 1 


'X.dr 


FTSE afl-sharo 
Index (rebased) 


Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Jan Feb 


FOOD retailers were lick¬ 
ing their wounds after sev¬ 
eral brokers turned bearish 
of the sector. Henderson 
Crosthwaite drew a red 
pencil across the board 
telling clients that the main 
players in the sector were 
overvalued. 

Those coming under the 
hammer included Asda. 
9Up down to I94p, J 
Sainsbury, fop to 468p, 
Tesco. 6p to 5l7p. 
Somerfield. *p to 252■sp, 
and Wm Morrison Supers 
markets. 5p to 255*ap. 
Safeway resisted the trend 
adding 2*2 p at 379p. 

Asda was also hit by 


cautious comments from 
Credit Lyonnais Laing. the 
broker, which has down¬ 
graded its recommenda¬ 
tion. from “buy" lo "hold". 
Laing’s Paul Smiddy says 
Asda has been standing at a 
19 per cent premium to the 
sector, making it 7 per cent 
more expensive than the 
best performer, Tesco. 

Brokers are also contin¬ 
uing to reflect on last 
week's disappointing trad¬ 
ing statement from Sains¬ 
bury showing likefor-like 
sales growth of just 32 per 
cent NatWest Markets is 
urging clients to switch into 
Tesco. 


the day among blue chips was 
British Energy, down 22p at 
438p. Salomon Smith Barney, 
the US securities house, main¬ 
tains the shares are overval¬ 
ued. It has put a target price 
on the shares of 429p. 

Northern Ireland Electric¬ 
ity has now changed its name 
to Viridian. The shares fin¬ 
ished 4 \p cheaper at 566p. 

Some positive comments 
from HSBC James Capef, the 
broker, lifted Bank of Scot¬ 
land 54 p to 675p, while 
Lloyds TSB was down 4p at 
8574 p before foil-year results 
on Friday. NatWest Markets, 
the broker, is forecasting an 
increase in pre-tax profits 
from £22> billion to E3 billion. 
HSBC also advanced 13p to 
£16.79. reflecting another posi¬ 
tive performance for financial 
markets in Asia overnight. 

Mears Group, which is 
listed on the AIM. held steady 
at I2p as Michael Turl 
chucked in the towel as man¬ 
aging director and unloaded 
92 million shares at 104 p 
with various institutions. The 
Turl family continues to hold 
5.8 million shares, or 15.6 per 
cent 

A clutch of “buy” recom¬ 
mendations failed to make 
much impression on Lasmo, 
down 3p at 262p. Morgan 
Stanley, Merrill Lynch, and 
Dresdner Kleinwort Benson 
are all pushing the shares to 
clients. 

There was a positive re¬ 
sponse to first-time dealings in 
Eurosov Energy. Shares in 
the oil industry services group 
were placed by T Hoare, the 
broker, at lOOp and opened at ' 
1054 p. They later closed at 
102p, a premium of 2p. j 

□ GILT-EDGED: Bond 
prices failed to consolidate | 
their early lead achieved on . 
the back of some better than ! 
expected producer price num¬ 
bers. 

A wobbly start by US trea¬ 
sury bonds put paid to any 
hopes that the London market 
could consolidate its position. 

In the futures pit, the March 
series of the long gilt closed 
E*ie lower at E£22 M i6 in 
modest trading that saw just 
26.000 contracts completed. ■" 

fn longs. Treasury 8 per cent 
2021 was unchanged at 
£123 25 3 j as was Treasury 74 
per cent 2007 on £10B T ie. 

□ NEW YORK: Shares drift¬ 
ed lower on a lade of fresh 
economic news. By midday 
the Dow Jones industrial aver¬ 
age was down 15.69 points to 
8.173.80. 


SAP Compos tv_ 

Tokyo: 

SUM Average _ 

Hong Kong: 

Hang Sene - - 

Amsterdam: 

aEs lnd«_ 

Sydney. 

AO ... 

Frankfurt 
dax_ 

Singapore: 

StfBlU ..._— 

Brussels: 

General_ 

Paris: 

CAC-W-..... 

Zurich: 

SKA Gen — 


100148 KW8) 


J 7205,00 HM.W) 


10873,15 (*387.29) 


97197 (41.981 


3085 J (+29-9 


456555 (*67.22) 


154172 (*641) 


15449J3 (♦57.91) 


3220.94 (*4J28) 


1352-80 (-*0.70) 


London: 

FT 30 - 3445J (-7^9 

FTSE 100 - 5600.9 (-2823)' 

FTSE 250 _ 4978.3 (+7.9) 

FTSE 350_fttfl.fi (-f OS) 

FTSE Euro top 100_2498.34 (-1.97) 

FTSE AUSbaiv _260177 f-9L 16) 

FTSE Non Financials _ 2S7CLS0 (-5.S41 
FTSE Fixed ininm_I37.» fnio) 


FTSE Govi secs . 

Bargains -- 

5EAQ Volume __ 

uss- 

German Marie _ 
Exchange index 


_ 102-84 (Same) 

-6025 

_787.2m 

_1.6340 (-01)165) 

-196391*00036) 

_ 1041 (-01) 


Bank of England official dose (4pm) 

fcECU- 1.5030 

fcSDR-1.2145 

RFt _ 1600 Doc (X6%J Jan 1987=100 

HPIX_158-3 Dec (2.7%) Jan 1987=100 


Abbey Natl Dublin 11 

97V 

Aihlone Extrusions 

92 - 5 

Bass B 

95 

Diageo B 

510 

Eurosov Energy 

102 

General Inds 

35V 

Longmead (135) 

140V 

Marchpole 

94V 

Razorback Vehicles 

102V 

Richards Group 

60*i 

Sanctuaiy warrants 

6V ... 


HIGttTSI 


Derwent VTy n/p (520) 40 1 : - 1 
PemexEngyn/p(iS5) lb 


RISES: 

Mofins.3t0p(+37 , ap) 

Ah- London.245p (+274p) 

BPP. 635p (+42Vp) 

Premier Famell. 379'43 (+ 22 p) 

Aggreto.170'ip (+flp) 

Orange.320p(+10p) 

Sinclair Mortf.229p(+1t'sp) 

Character Group —.165Vp(+8p) 

AsWaad . Z11'*t(+10p) 

Chrysalis.646p (+27* ap) 

Caradon. 17fip(+7pj 

TBbury Douglas.2tSp (4-8'sp) 

Ramco Energy. TZTsp (+27 , apj 

Caim Energy.453p (+16’4>) 

British Vita .257*4) (+9p) 

Sebe. 1217p (+42p) 

P&O . 7?8p (+23p) 

Gtynwed ........241p(+9 , spj 

FALLS: 

Brfflsb Energy.438p (-32p) 

Goldsmiths Group.255p (-10’sp) 

Northamber.245p(~J0p) 

GRE. 392p{-15p) 

Abbey National. I239p(~46p} 

J Salisbury.. 468p (-T 6 p) 

WSAlkins. 44flpM6p) 

Brewin Dolphin.. 29(-lOp) 

Oxford Insf.287! jp (-9p) 

JDWetherapoon.30T;p (-lOp) 

Macro 4.320p(-1Dp} 

Closing Prices Page 33 


--si 

A question of savings 


AIRLINES love to moan about the unpredict¬ 
ability of their business. Fuel costs, currency 
fluctuations, volatility in traffic and the 
depredations of discounting rivals make it 
almost impossible to forecast the outcome. It is 
difficult to argue; airline profits must be the 
least defensible of any industry but B ritish 
Airways added further confusion yesterday by 
revealing an extra £32 million of engtre 
maintenance costs. 

According to BA. the blame lies with late 
delivery of invoices by GE and improvements 
to their stable of RB-2II jet engines. Perhaps, 
but if the company cannot accurately budget its 
maintenance expenditure how can the market 
make erven an educated stab at guessing BA’s 
running overhead? Within the maelstrom of ■ 
plunging foe! costs and a spiralling pound, the 
outlook for BA is not too bad. The pound's 


strength is helping BA ro coax rourisjs to the 
FhTiak helping it to avoid 
dumping of extra capacity on me *tgh 
Atlantic routes. And BA's, chief executive 
expresses hope that its American affiance will 
be allowed through the regulatory hoops m 

B TheWg question is whether BA is 
promised cost-savings of £1 bffion ly 2000.. 
There are assurances but evidence is patchy 
The deal with cabin crew means that new stafl 
will cost less, saving £200 million in a foil 
year. Add to that sub-comracnng of services 
and new agreements on cargo handling and 
£600 million of annualised savings are in me 
bag already. But do not expect to see thai in 
the bottom line, fn the worki of BA, £1 bfflwn 
of cost-savings could be here today and gone 
tommorrow. There are safer bets. 


PizzaExpress 

WHEN Peter Boizot wrote 
the PizzaExpress cookbook 
in 1972 he can scarcely have 
imag ined that it would one 
day become a bible to an 
army of pizza makers knock¬ 
ing out more than ten mil¬ 
lion pizzas a year. 

Luke Johnson and Hugh 
Osmond turned a simple 
formula of pizzas and trendy 
interiors into one of the stock 
market's brightest stars, ex-, 
ponding it to more than 150 
restaurants in the UK alone. 
While the basic formula 
remains intact; the recent 
decision of Messrs Johnson 
and Osmond to step down as 
executive directors has 
caused a few jitters. 

Will the bubble burst? In 
particular, fears have been, 
voiced over the cost of new 
sites in the face of an increas¬ 
ingly competitive environ¬ 
ment where lease premiums 


Astec(BSR) 

AST EG (BSR) shareholders 
may be forgiven for being 
confused. Emerson Electric, 
which owns 51 per cent of 
Astec. says the company's 
prospects are grim. Its mar¬ 
kets will remain intensely 
competitive, eroding profits 
and margins, and investment 
in the necessary new prod¬ 
ucts will consume all avail¬ 
able cash, hence its inability 
to sustain dividends. 

But the company itself is 
bullish. Profits are rising 
ahead of City forecasts, the 
market has shown resilience 
in die face of Asia’s woes and 
there is $100 million in the 
bank for a rainy day. 

‘*• So, who to believe? Even 
Astecs executive directors 
find themselves on different 
sides of foe argument, while 
congratulating themselves 
for running a fine company. 
Emerson says Hip a share is 
a decent offer for the minority 
shares; the stock market 
prices the equity at 126p. 

Yesterday's hastily pub- 


on the best sites are again 
becoming common. 

Like-for-tike sales growth 
of 9 per cent for three-year- 
old restaurants and a 40 per 
cent return on capital in the 
second year should help to 
allay fears, while the move 
■ into overseas franchising 
looks a good way to widen 
growth with limited expo¬ 
sure. David Page, the new 


chairman, satys the board 
structure is lime different to 
that of the post five years 
same roles, different t itles . 
The imminent addition of 
two further wm-executives 
will also be a comfort to the 
corporate governance police. 

The stock is by no means 
cheap; but Peter Boizofs 
cookbook is unlikely to be 
remaindered just ytt. 


SAME PIZZAS, HIGHER RENTS 


PIZZAEXPRESS 1 
share price t 


” s y--- -->y i- ----vl 500 

Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Jan Feb 


lished annual figures give the 
lie to Emerson’s claim. Yet in 
spite of the anger -of City 
institutions at the way the US 
company has behaved, Em¬ 
erson is in the driving seat ft 
may nor secure the required, 
acceptances to take over the 
company but it can otherwise 
dictate terms to minority 
shareholders. They may have 
their day in court but a 
prolonged legal battle can 
only damage the company. - 
The nightmare for inves¬ 
tors is that Emerson should 
walk away, leaving the situa> 
lion unresolved. Sharehold¬ 
ers would do well to sell into 
the market now. 

Silver 

FEW on this side of the pond 
may remember, but Paul Re¬ 
vere, the American revolu¬ 
tionary hero who rode to warn 
the minutemen of the arrival 
of British soldiers, was a sil¬ 
versmith. IHe bullion mar¬ 
kets have more pressing 
matters to attend to than 
American history but it may 


explain why silver has a larg¬ 
er echo in the American sub- 
coosdous titan it does to foe 
British. Americans still col¬ 
lect silver dollars, once com¬ 
mon currency, and present 
titan as gifts. So the behav¬ 
iour of Warren Buffett who 
last week revealed that he 
had secured a fifth of world 
silver production and that of 
his unfortunate antecedents. 
Nelson and Bunker Hunt 
may have an element of senti¬ 
mentality about it . 

Market sentiment is much. 
less patriotic and the worry is 
that the silver price is bang 
propped, up by a frantic 
searrii for sfiver to deliver to 
Berkshire Hathaway, in 
order *q tAtofy Mr Buffet's 
purchases. Demand in the 
Par East is depressed and the 
price rise combined with col- 
lapring currencies offers a 
good reason to dump silver. 
If Paul Revere were still in 
tiie saddle, he would be rid¬ 
ing to warn America that the 
sellers are coming. 

. CarlMorttshed 


iur 

tool 


=: <-\ha! 


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Wid Dam 5M « C Sr, n 3£ 38 

'*566*1) 605 7S*i 3T 45 62 M'i 

EM 5CD « 54 Ifir, 26 Jf'- 

'■Saw 5M I? 33 4I*. 4?: S’ 57 

WW 5M 55 rav 02*1 OT: JZ'r J3 

vvn, M 27 fi", U U 5?, 

Sawn 1500 12/ ISO 2X 109 l« IM', 
:'1915'y) 3® 65 144 178V IB7'»J9i'WtB 
Par. «H E6V 8r 10) 71’- 47 W; 

'■M5j B) 26 S! ?7 <0 8J 

TO M K P, 3t M S5'( 
I'TO) Ml 33 1 : 5I T » (0 64'; B2 93 

Si A.-WT. B) 36S 56 Tr a-, 3T.- 46 

•35)M 500 IT M5 ST 1 , SI W TS 

5P BCD 51 77'/ 34'.- J4 «■: 57 

!-ai5':t K >0 29 S*’: TtT: 6 '*.- 75 83 

Si >d l» 1?.- IT- JO'i A 95 11'f 

•■1331 140 gi, 14 n 8 l 5 151 , 

MO 61 77 96 23 38 46 

6 M 35*.- 53 73 46 60*.- 71 

C.U 350 107": 143*. 164': 4?, 65'; K*» 

>*ict.*) ia» mns w, 

SwiW t«0 161'.2S9'-5M|, E 6 117,123'.- 
i-iaar.) ism no is* 3ia*»iii'»iM dg 
f58C IfiCO lC 6 SW,m 99 I4?*J169'> 

'■IHI; 1)110 12!’.-194', 22) )50*i 199 ZM 
•ffliitn «» S3 W. 104 48 B3 1 - 6 T 

-?:95 950 40 754 81 74 90 93 

ia 350 61'( 91 112 » 54^ 69 

'■S64'.-) JOOtl S', 65 »V 59 7-J'. ffi'r 

U«) 5*e 1050 12 91 114 M 49'. 6 ! 

(■10791 HOT *5’, 84', j?', 55 ', nv 85 

J43 SO 57 ffl m it! 20 21; 

i'5Ml 600 26*, 40 31 4;>- 5fl'. 

r«l Pur 650 41 S7 71 3 i>, 50 go 

‘* 6 H '.-1 TOT 2D 1 , 37 51 6 |i, *)>. 30 

WWM H50 84 115 ', 142 75'? 96 11 j 
;*1160',) 12DD 6 T, 95’, 1315105VI23 139*' 
te«r, 550 39*, 54 F9 »: 4J-- 53 ', 

1 "SO*) MO 1B'» 42*, 57V ED 7J'i 81V 

8^45i» 6 W fiff .. ST, si j? ty, 55 

(•E85J 763 S*. 59 66 58 7 J 80-, 1 

VXeioj JOT 32 40 '. 5 J'. |r, 19 ., ;««. 

<•877? ffl ii a a a js ; 

3jt£w< «M 29 39 49V 1? 27*.- 33 

1-4571 EDO 1"* 23 32 SOV Wr 

51*11 420 26 *. iPfl !1 J j I 

I’ISi'ii 4W 12 2iv 31 41', tt', 55 1 

irt*i Ben S* 55 a IDS ffi 59 79'.- 

1-802; CO J4>, 53 65 ft 9? 106 I 

'to Da £50 76’.-1134128'.- SC, « 77 ! 

.-SSO'.-J TOO 51*- 91 106 56 « UC . 

Tharrex 350 4B 73 *)*: 20'.- ffl 47't 


GNI LONDON GRAIN FUTURES 
LIFFE WHEAT I UFFE BARLEY 
(do*e C/Q fdo«r E /0 


Mar 

_hIJS 

Mar.. 

__75.75 

Mav 

81A5 

May - 

-78.UO 

Jill . 

_... M no 

%-p ... 

__7S40 

Sep 

-.te'.7S 

*Ur» .. 

_W.40 

No* 

.... -- 83.75 

JJn 

-62.40 


volume hi 


vnlume: 12 


COMMODfTIES 

ICIS-LOR (London b.OTpm) | 

CRUDE OlLS(5/b»rrt( FOB) ! 

Brem rhj'.tal- 14.75 ^ 3.15 

UlWU 15 day (Man- 15 JO J5 

U/vnl I5da> (Apr)- 15.50 -n.15 

wTnatlnKrnmJiwIMjn i*>70 -oi? 

Wlcu, InirrmudlulcUpr) lo •» -015 
PRODUCTS (5/ Ml) 

Spot CIF NW Europe' (prompi dtOm)) 

RhJ UIIi.T 

Prcmiurn UnM -. Itcin/Q Ml-i) 

Gaswl EEC_ Hltnai I43ln/cj 

A5 Tud Oil_ SQi-tl oli-n 

Na|4i)h*.- -. 1 52 tnJtri 154 in'ri 

irE FUTURES (GNI lid) 

GASOIL 

Feb 140 u>40J5 Mav I45JM5.M 

Msr 141.75-42‘JJ Jun . H7J5-47.75 

Apr . 14350-45.7S Vial. 15503 

BRENT ItUJOpin) 

Mar — 15-28-15JO Juu .. IS.4H-I5«» 

■\pr _15.47-1? 44 Jul ..._unq 

May [567-15 71 Vi>[. 27J5H. 


fCMfiealj (Voltunr prev day) LONDON METAL EXCHANGE Rudoff Wolff 

CopperCOe A iJ/mnn-."- Oik H#or>-luTt)A) 3n«tE lb*nji-lwM.u Vot 113257* 

Leap IS/umne)- 57)JTV5’J.<0 5315O-53U0 21252.* 

zinc Spec III Gde If 1 runnel IOSkoIOVIO 1082010825 265«XJ 

Tin (S'ion nil-- . 525CIIV«550 S27IXO527S.0 177* 

Aluminium HI Cdt IS.’tonncl IWjJ-lftnO 135553 

Nickel isiinnne)_ 54**10-5465.ci J57iuJ.J1,5.o liW!l 

UFFE OPTIONS ^ - i 


LONDON FiMAMCIAL 




UFFE POTATO (Ml i»pen One 

Mar __ unq 70.0 

Apr_*AO 71 JO 

May -- 54.U MJj 

Volume 65 

RUBBER (No I KSS Of p/k) 

Mar. - 51.75-5225 

UFFE BIFFEX (T.N! Lid SIDIpQ 



HJch 

Lew 

Clotv 

Feti "W 

531 

W 

OJ5 

M»r>W 

1005 

10)5 

IDS 

Apr 

1090 

UfV 

t<P*5 

Jul W 

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500 

25 

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m 160 12'.- IV: 2S IV II'. 14'.- 

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J-329W JM 7'.- 24*? i’ J 25V 26V 

B too 1700 64 IM',187 IT, W 112V 

I’ITIlI 1800 lir.- W: 13” 76', 137 163 

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I'TlB'd 600 2': 5'.- 7 21 31 13', 

GatWc 330 3'i 3r, 4J 1 12 iy. 

(•3STd 360 6 ', IT.- 7T. V, ft 29'i 

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625 

73V 

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260 


24 

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14 

16V 

rafitj 

380 

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19V 

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275 

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lT04'.1 7M I 10 ir, 16', a 2i 
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Urt Sa WB 4' 14 ft 1 .- J :$■, ft 

I'CW'H 280 - TV 12'.- 19'- IT; 

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B15 750 »V 67 85 15'- 41V O’- 

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r«s*.-j 230 15V JJV m 25 n 38 

tempi 4M in 52', 117 32V 5l 63 

1*8731 SCO 36 70 ffl'i 57V 75V i?: 


[*873| OTO 36 70 88V 

503 Sr.' 49V ffi 

I*5II',) 550 nv 26V 41 

Ixnac 100 r, ?V 13** 

1 * 1021 110 Ti S 9V 

Innttn 3OT 22*.- 43V 49 

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flDV 341 398 

33 3 »V — 

??3 280V 334'- 

197 250V 

172V 224V 276V 

ISO 203 — 

127 179 229 


106 1« 237 

137V 307',- 264 

174 V 236V JK 

219 266 31 O’ 


fHxm 3 Toot 1097 Ctfte 3W Ptft 712 


31OV 

nutatim 


X 36 ’> 53 
45*- 62 77 
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73V V- 1C: 
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12 S5V I- 
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Maf JW 

187 — 

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22DV — 
3MV 
26C - 

28S 388*, 

nv - 

J38V 364 

: M ta U ffl prita 


Long CHl 

Mar*»8 

122-21 

122-31 

122-20 

122-22 

26417 

Previous open lnrere*i I**35I3 

Jon «W .. 

106-28 

106-31 

106-24 

106-24 

1478 

German Govt Bond (Bund) 

MarOB . 

I0&J6 

106.44 

10628 

10630 

72430 

Previous 'jpen Imeiroi a»UJ4 

Jun W - 

105.82 

105 XI 

103 JO 

10572 

36 

German Gom Bond (Bob!) 

Mur*W . 

IQ5-21 

10521 

10519 

10519 

254 

Previous open Inrerevt l*»53 

Jun 98 _ 




104-85 

0 

Italian Govi Bond (BTP) 

Mar <W . 

117.42 

117.42 

II7J5 

1I7J0 

24129 

Prert.ju> open miersi itzao 

Jun "S ~ 

110.78 

11683 

11678 

11678 

2261 

Japanese Govt Bond (JGB) 

Mar **8 . 

129.14 

129 J7 

12517 

120-27 

1786 


Jun 98 ~ 

138J6 

1284* 

128.56 

USAS 

7sa 

Three Mth Sterling 

M*r<» . 

9155 

92JO 

92JS0 

9U2 

12759 

Jin 98 - 

9168 

92.71 

92JMI 

U65 

14199 

PieMouv open inieres) MOM 8 

Sep 98 .. 

42.88 

92.90 

92JM 

92J5 

9083 

Three Mth Euromark 

Mar on . 

9U.42 

9643 

9642 

9643 

11326 

Previikw open Inieren aooftp) 

Jun 98 . 

9fa_27 

46» 

9627 

9628 

28754 

Three Mth Eurolira 

Mar 98 . 

*M. 16 

44.16 

94.11 

44.11 

16375 

Previous open Inieren 719918 

Jun 98 _ 

95.(17 

9507 

44277 

9500 

14618 

TTiree Mth Euraswiss 

Mar 98 . 

98.71 

98.74 

«69 

9673 

8(44 

Previous .ipen imeresl 16VM3 

Jun 98 „ 

98JW 

9861 

98.57 

98*1 

3757 

Three Mth ECU 

Mar 95 . 


9566 

9565 

4166 

662 

Previous open Imcrea iSJTi 

Jun 98 _ 

95.09 

9569 

4568 

95*9 

107 

FTSE 100 

Mar 98 . 

564 ao 

56750 

S9KUJ 

56120 

5766 

Previous opal Inrcren 2449 

Jun 98 .. 




56750 

0 


MONEY RATES 


B»sr Rates: Ctearins Banks 7'. Finance Use 8 

Disown .Market Loans O/nlgbl high: 7*. Low b Week fixed: 7*» 

Treasury Bills (DiskBuy: 2 rnih T.: 3 mbiT.. Sell: 2 mih T .; 3 mill: 7*.. 


Prune BaiA Bills (IHs): 7V7\ 

Sterling Money Rates 7"o-7"i, 
Interbank: 7**w“"e 

a,eral«lic open r». close V .. 


Local AmboriJy Dtps 
Slcrfinf; CD* 

Dollar CDs 


2 mth 

3 mUi 

6 mill 

UnOi 

7WH 

7*f7*i 

7W*. 


7 , '.-? ,, u 

7"u-7% 

7"«-7**u 

V^rV'n 

TV r ?u a 

7 T S.-7 n n 

7%-T"n 

7%-7% 

n/a 

T» 

7*- 

7', 

W e 

TtT'm 

T*--r. 

7"h-7* b 

n/a 

SAl 

5S4 

5.60 

7<*u-r« 

7"b-Tu 

7"«-7°l- 

Tr7*H 


Citrmwy 

7 day 

1 mth 

j mth 

& mth 

can 

Dollar; 

5"e^'u 

r-5*. 

yrr, 

5V5*i 

pr4*. 

DeriKhnnuh: 

3V3V 

v„y. 

3',-y. 

Try, 

4-3 

French Franc 

JVJ’. 

3'.-3*. 



3'rZ'i 

Swifi. Franc 


2VI" b 


IVI% 

IV, 

Vcs 

'/’l 

W 


V. 

1 -par 


GOLD/PRECIOUSMETAiS (Bahtl&Cby: : :; 

Bullion: Open S^. 10-206 jO CkKe SjOI. 10-301.60 High: 5301JO-301 JO 
Low SZ>8.10208.50 AM: S3m.CV PM; *300,60 
kroferraod: SMWO-3fe.ro ILIRiiO IW 001 

rtatiimn: JJ46lM((74Jj51 Silver; S7XMS 114J4) Palladium: pviffl (LI 44.451 


MkJ Rates for Feb^ 

AiTBi«dam..- 

Brussels- 

Copenlw^en_ 

Dublin_ 

FranUuR—_— 

Lisbon-— 

Madrid_— 

Milan — 

Montre a l __ 

New York- 

Oslo-__— 

Paris_...__ 

SiocUiolm 

Tokyo-- 

sienna.—™ 
Zurich-——— 
Soane. Ext W 


Rmp 

3JMO-JJ449 
6IQ2D4IJ80 
VSttr}lJ]2 
1.1774-1.1853 
2.9574-1*72 
302.76-303^0 
250.71-25 UO 

29Z5.«»-aC8J 

ZJ3te-2J1S3 

10028-1 

I2J44-12J69 

9.91104.9510 

I3J22-I3232 

202^5-333.86 

3L80SW79 

ZJM7-2-3927 


Clase 

3^383-30413 
ftl.M5-t.U18 
1UKVIU97 
1.1802-1.1822 
2.9t,| 1-2.9U7 
*33.12-303^7 
250.91-25 UP 
2925.<».^aj 


I mouth 3 ataudi 
iv-lpr 3>r-)i,pr 

20-lSpr w>53 pr 

'^.pr 

l4-7pr 4>3&pr 

'r»ipr 2V-2*,pr 

Vipr 2 *p]'ipr 

54-f.lpr |73-I54pr 


2?»2S.9-S»28J 35-l9pr iOMQpr 

U42J-U447 0J0-0.44pr 

1«2B «D8 024KL222W 074^.7 Ipr 

I2M-32J53 V«er iv 1 pr 

3'«*r*r 9‘^pr 

15Jtt-133S5 V,pr 

l VI pr 3V3V7T 

20.834-31854 VjJJf 2-l*.pr 

2J875-2JW6 iV-niS . 3VJVpr 

Ptmuutt ■ pr. DisootuU * ds. 


Australia . 

Austria-- 

Belgium (Corn)— 

Canada-- 

Denmark_ 

France ... 

Germany-- 

Hong Kong-- 

Ireland . . 

rtaijr- 

Japan ...... 

Malaysia_ 

Nefbertands_ 

Norway —__ 

Portugal . 

Singapore- 

Spain_ 

Sweden —__ 

Switzerland_ 


- 1.4867-14878 

- 12.74-12.75 

- 37.42-37A6 

- 1.4343-1.4345 

- 6.«10V*.9129 

- 6018860740 

-1^133-1^138 

- 7.73807.7390 

- IJ825;13S40 

——. 1791.1-17926 

- J2lS5-tMJ6S 

-28225-28325 

-20439-20444 

- 7-5545-7JW5 

-155 AS-185.75 

- 1.6565-1/695 

- 153.64-153-60 

— 21108-8.1186 
-1.4615-1.4625 


Argenilna peso*_ 

Australia dollar 

Bahrain dinar_ 

Brazil real*_ 

China yuan__ 

Cyprus pound_ 

Finland markka__ 

Greece drachma _ 

Hong Kong dollar_ 

India rupee _____ 

Indonesia rupiah_ 

Kuwait dinar KD_ 

Malaysia ringgit_ 

New Zealand dollar _ 

Pakistan rupee __ 

Saudi Arabia rtyal _ 

Singapore dollar_ 

S Africa rand (com) _ 

u a E dirham__ 

fiartftga Trtosaty* 1 


- I-63 35-1.6362 

- 24295-24328 

-0611-0*25 

- 1-8380-1.8409 

- 1X443-12743 

-0860087"} 

-8.925-0066 

- 464^5-474.75 

— 126462-126556 

-62.766406 

-— - J)/a 

- 049554X5065 

-6^341-63200 

-— 27985-28036 

-7a 7o Buy 

- 5.905-6.040 

-- 27077-27143 

- 7.972-8.141 

—29575-63)935 
ueydsBank 


AMP Inc 4ZV Ok 

AM* Qnp IW 12 HV 

at* 7 an 

Abban lata 7T« 71N 
Mnand Mias 195 185 
Acna Life «jv- m 

Abnuuwm (HR 6is «n 
Air Find a Ctaan BT- B4*. 
AtaTnnn Comm 4TW 

Albemon 4T. 465 
Akan Abunnrn 31*. ji*. 
ADIed Signal 41'. 414. 
Alan, Co oi Am 7 S'- 78%. 
Amerada Bess 58 SBS 

A 8 J*_ 486, 

Aawr Ewes on gfiV 
Ainer Gen] corp 57 1 . sr» 
Amer Horn Ft «% m 
AIMx Inu 1 IT, ILT. 
Amer Store* 2 JV 22 % 
Amer snndanl m 
Anwtedi 4J'« 4ZV 

Am*en SR S3% 

Amoco US’- R5>- 

Andrew Corp 284 IT5 
ABfteureMBttdL 45S 45% 
Apple Comparer US in 
Aitber Danteb Z 2 S 375 . 
Anmeo 4 % 

Antwrog wrta 71 V 71"* 
feareo 2 T> 23 ** 

AO Rbilteld 749 7ft 
AUnd Qhp 176 17% 

A1UD Data FN 60% 61 


1 - Rb9 

n*6 | 

mkfcky 

.. “ 1 




31 652 

AMVESCAF 853 
ASDA Gp 8.200 
Abbey Nd 2300 
Ailnoe* (elc2303 
Allied Dom I.40Q 
AB Foods 927 
BAA 2203 

BAT tods 5400 
BC 7,900 

BOC 753 

BP 7.900 

BSfiyB 2 HU 

BTR 20500 
BT 1ft ICO 

Bk of Sect 2M0 
Barclay, 1,900 
Bass 484 

BDIIlon 2900 
Blue Clide 1BTO 
BOOB 2700 
BAfi Ir203 . 

BA 4J00 

British EnetaiM5 
BrWsti land 672 
Bril Steel 12000 
Coble wife 7,100 
Cadbwy < 734 

Carlton Ores 3 J00 
Cemrica 8JOO 
cm Union U00 
Olagea 12800 

Dixons 2J0D 
EMI 6200 
Energy Gp 6,900 
EnterprOU 697 
GKN 221 

ORE 1,900 
CDS JJTO 
Gen Ace 1,500 
cmEtec &ajo 
Glaxo Weil 5J» 

Granada ijoo 
HSBC 1 Jtn 

Halifax 6000 
Haw 932 

ICl ' 1,000 

Kingfisher 3.703 
iaSmo sjto 
Ladbrok* mmo 


Land Secs 962 
Legs! ACn 2200 
Lloyds TSB 7.50Q 

Lucasvarliy 2200 

Marts Spr 4J*» 
NaiWS Bt 2500 
NM Grid . 1600 
Hjtforer j^oo 
Next 1900 
N«wfcbUn 2600 
NycoiiRd Amer4l 

Orange t.wo 

PRO 1.70] 

Pearson . 1.400 
prawrGen 6*8 
Prudential inn 
RaOtradc ijoo 
R ank Group 1.100 
Recktncol 133 
Reed Inti 2000 
KemokB 1000 
RetfflRs ft200 
EfoTbun 2007 
Rolls Royce 4J00 
Royal A Sun 3JX» 
Royal BkSct 24W 
'Safeway 2000 
Jains btay 2900 
schroden « 
Scot ft New 34* 
Sew Power 2600. 
SvmTrenr 306 
Sbdl THW» ZL800 
glebe tjm 
SroKlBcB 11.600 

smiths aids rroo 
smciwtd ijoo 
. Sun Ufe 102 
Tesco 8J300 
nuunesW IJOO 
TDreto» 1.700 
Unilever MOO 
tird Utilities WOO 
(fid News W 
Vodsfone . SJOO 
wm feread 503 
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THE TIMES TUESDAY FEBRUARY JO 1998 


Style counsel points to jam tomorrow 


S wfcfefratotbcfiootjaf 

celebrities into Down¬ 
ing Street since the elec¬ 
tion tharyou cotdd be forgiven 
for beUeving tfi« the Govern¬ 
ment was attempting' to 
recreate Hollywood in swi. 
Tony Blair, has" partied with' 
Oasis. Chris Smith, the Secre¬ 
tary of state for Culture, 
Media and Sport; has signed 
up Lord Ptfonam, Paul Smith, 
cne fashion designer, and die 
ubiquitous Richard Branson .. 
fo sit marcreatiye industries 
task force. ' ".*■ 

Superftaally Labour’s woo¬ 
ing of the Soho s«’k>t&s little 
more than an exercise in - 
public relations. Tbe Govern- ! 
ment has been as keen as any- 
teenage groupie to be seen 
hanging. .out with pop stars 
and artists, hoping that some . 
of foe star qualities rub off on : 
tbe Admiaihrafion. The pdb^ ; 


Ifcjseems expected'to suspend. 
“its disbelief al the sight of 
middle-aged pofindans trying, 
to show that they are abreast 
of the latest *yot«" culture- • ■ • 

- Tahonr likes , to argue its 
courting of die stars isparr of 
its attmpt fo •‘rebrarKT Brit¬ 
ain. The Government has tak¬ 
en to trumpeting Britain's 
-Strength in music, deagnand 
new media, and playing down 
its •‘‘heritage"‘aspects, rather. 
as if h is writing one of those 
lists of new year 'ins. and 
wits*. ■; 

Tony Blair asked Sir Ter¬ 
rence Conran to design a 
meeting room for hissuinrait 
with Jacques Chirac --just in 
case the French President was 
in any doubt about the cultur¬ 
al skills of *Tes rosfcrifs" Peter 
MajxWson has deigned to 
proyide - fittfe : information 
about the great MiBenmum 


i.BUSJNESSOP: POLITICS 


Dome project ex¬ 
cept to suggest that 
It wfll provide a 
showcase for the 
country's design 
and innovation tal¬ 
ent, The Govern¬ 
ment's obsession 
with style and im¬ 
age is. however, in 
danger of obscuring 
the real motivation 
for its promotion of 
new media. Labour is not so 
much intent on developing a 
coherent arts policy as an 
industrial strategy. An arts 
polity would also take into 
account the needs of tradition¬ 
al arts such as theatre, classi¬ 
cal music and opera. Instead 
die Government has excluded 



ALASDA1R 

MURRAY 


these Iran the cre¬ 
ative industries com¬ 
mittee and slashed 
the Arts Council 
budget — offending 
many longstanding 
supporters in the 
process. 

The creative in¬ 
dustries task force 
has an economic 
_ not a cultural man¬ 
date. Mr Smith 
spelt this out Iasi autumn, 
telling a Fabian conference 
that the Government believed 
that the jobs and wealth 
creation of the future would 
come from the creative sector. 
“U we gent right, then we will 
be able to assist some of the 
most important industrial sec¬ 


tors in Britain for the new 20 
to 30 years," he chimed. 

the sea or is already esti¬ 
mated to generate about £50 
billion a year and is the 
founh-largest earner for the 
Treasury. Critics argue that 
the strong growth rate in the 
sector, which has been 
achieved without much Gov¬ 
ernment recognition, is a les¬ 
son in why the State should 
refrain from interfering. But 
Labour has absorbed the lat¬ 
est US economic thinking, 
backed up by reports from 
left-leaning think-tanks such 
as Demos, which emphasises 
the need for supply-side re¬ 
forms to improve the job- 
creating potential of the 
sector. Eric Salama. market¬ 
ing direaor of WPP and one of 
the task force members, 
emphasises that the industry 
does not want government 


money but practical help in 
improving training, education 
and access to private finance. 
“We are discussing ways of 
improving the education sys¬ 
tem and if anything can be 
done to enable small com¬ 
panies to benefit from venture 
capital." he explains. “We 
want to discover why multi- 
media start-ups perform 
much better in the US." 

In effect the Government is 
trying to construct the first 
post-industrial industrial poli¬ 
cy. The strong support for the 
creative industries is in total 
contrast to the hesistant app¬ 
roach to traditional industries 
— witness the rather uncert¬ 
ain handling of die coal crisis, 
a sector thaf was once dose to 
the party's heart. Dawning 
Street wants to be at the hub. 
not of a new Hollywood, but 
of a British Silicon Valley. 


Surveying outlook sees firms 

West in fight for capital 



The profession 
is undergoing 
upheaval and 
polarisation, 
saysCari 
Mortished 


'alk into one offhe 
big surveying 
firms in Mayfair 
and ask the first 
agent you meet what his 
business is all about. In the dd 
days the answer would have 
been “location". Today if you 
ask the same .question the 
response is -.lilcdy to be 
“money" — or to be precise 
“capital’'.- 

An equally frequent re-. 
sponse might well be "haven’t 
a due". The turmoil that-is. 
hitting this industry with in¬ 
corporation. restructurings, 
mergers - and alliances is 
changing this orice~cosy frater¬ 
nity beymd'ratogni&Ht Once 
upon atimeyou could moral] 
the people wharoaitered in tbe 





acres ot pnmc real estate in the 
West End. r: ' 

Today the borders don't just 
extend to the City of London 
but include ;America and 
Europe arid points beyond. By 
the end of foe century^ the top 
five or six surveying firms 
could well be under foreign 
ownership or lfoked^by finan¬ 
cial support to overseas cbm- 
panies. These in turn r could 
become targets of financial 
service giants looking for. more 
income. Richard ElKs has tom 
itself asunder in search of the 
financial backers that it reck¬ 
ons to need to keep pace with 
international clients. Savflls 
has thrown its lot in with Hrst 
Pacific, the Hong Kong con¬ 
glomerate. and Jones Lang 
Wootton is abandoning part¬ 
nership and looking for its 
own sugar daddy, probably in 
America. 

Other surveying firms too 
are seeking further. global 
alliances. buoyant UK prop¬ 
erty market is sucking in 
American capital that was 
once heading to foe Far East 
UTZ Debenham Thorpe — 
which itself absorbed French, 
German. Dutch and. Belgian 
practices—flirted with CBC, a 
US partner, a deal that came 
unstuck when the latter^ ac¬ 
quired a Far. Eastern rival. 



Looking to America: from left. Andrew Huntley, Chris Peacock and Chris Bartram have noted the transatlantic trend 


KoU Rad Estate. Grimley 
GVA plans an eventual stock 
market fisting to underpin its 
worldwide expansion. • t 

The surveying firms say 
they are being driven by what 
their clients want The fashion 
is to follow your clients (read: 
follow foe money) round the 
world. Like foe accountants, 
surveyors want to offer a one-, 
stop shop to large funds or 
property companies, inpartie- 
ular advising big US pension 
funds on their property invest¬ 
ments in Europe. That means 
acquiring foreign businesses, 
hence the rush to incorporate 
and use shares as a bargain¬ 
ing tod. : 

But corporate deals , form 
only part of the strategy. The 
new-style surveyors don't just 
broke deals, they put their own 
money in the pot It is foe push 


towards comvestment along¬ 
side clients that arouses con¬ 
troversy and played a large 
part in splitting the Richard 
EUis organisation in two. An¬ 
drew Huntley, chairman of 
Richard Ellis UK is convinced 
(hat financial sendees point 
foe way forward. “We put die 
accent on coinvestment, corpo¬ 
rate deals and securitisation. 
Richard Ellis International 
are more traditionally driven." 

The split means that the 
former partners could end up 
at daggers drawn in some 
foreign field, both carrying 
shields bearing tbe Richard 
Ellis name. Insignia, foe $750 
million (£450 million) New 
York firm, is taking over 
Richard Ellis UK for £50 mil¬ 
lion, while CB Commercial, a 
Californian rival, is to take 
over RE’S 54 international 


offices. Mr Huntley admits 
that the split has caused no 
small heartache: “It has been a 
very difficult time." But he is 
convinced that coinvestment is 
key to the future and pointed 
to the sale of the DSS property 
portfolio as an example of foe 
way tilings could go." 

He said: "The largest prop¬ 
erty venture in foe UK has 
been DSS Prime. We were ad¬ 
vising and involved up to foe 
hilt But poor old RE was left 
out If we had been able to co¬ 
invest we would be in a much 
stronger position today." 

The Richard Ellis experi¬ 
ence is mirrored ar Jones Lang 
Wootton which failed to make 
the running for an important 
property mandate from Cal- 
Pers, the $126 billion Califor¬ 
nian state pension fund. Chris 
Peacock, JLW’s chief execu¬ 


tive. notes that coinvestment is 
seen as normal in the United 
States, a key source of busi¬ 
ness as US fund managers 
increase their allocations to 
Europe. He explains: There is 
a requirement from dienes 
that key advisers put their 
money where their mouth is. If 
you wish to be pre-eminent in 
real estate advice and you 
cannot put any capital into it. 
you are not going io be pre¬ 
eminent." 

In April JLW will incorpo¬ 
rate its worldwide partner¬ 
ship. which in 1997 had fee 
income of £253 million. But the 
search is on for a merger 
partner. Talks have taken 
place with LaSalle, the quoted 
US real estate firm, but Mr 
Peacock is also keeping other 
options open, including strate¬ 
gic stakeholders and, ultimate¬ 


ly. a flotation of the business. 
Not everyone >£ enamoured 
with the comvestment strategy 
which can create unease 
among clients. Some would 
prefer that their advisers re¬ 
main independent profession¬ 
als. rather than investment 
bedfellows. Chris Bartram. 
who runs the UK arm of 
Rodamco, the huge Dutch 
property fund, questioned 
whether surveyors had the 
muscle to engage in meaning¬ 
ful coinvestment and cau¬ 
tioned against the danger of 
putting the interests of some 
dients ahead of others. "If you 
have clients, ynu have an 
equal duty of care to all of 
them. Why would you have a 
capital partner who is also 
giving you advice?" 

However, Mr Bartram indi¬ 
cated that in fond manage¬ 
ment some coin vestment may 
be necessary. Rodamco recent¬ 
ly acquired RREEF, the sixth- 
higgesr US property fund 
manager, and secured an adv¬ 
isory role on a $500 million 
CalPers fond where he indicat¬ 
ed the comvestment require¬ 
ment was “significantly Jess 
than 5 per cent**. 

These conflicts are not new 
to the wheeling and dealing 
Mayfair property agents. Mil¬ 
ner Estates, which was for¬ 
merly Conrad Ritblat. foe 
surveying firm, is well on the 
way to becoming a medium- 
sized property company, while 
FPD Savills is already taking 
stakes in buildings via an in- 
house property fond. But foe 
transatlantic deal-making 
suggests more going on than 
just opportunistic trading. 

For firms like JLW to con¬ 
template mergers with big 
American corporates involves 
contemplating foe ultimate 
corporate sacrifice- In the 
shining sands of tire US 
financial services industry it 
cartnor be long before foe 
predators themselves become 
foe prey. In five years* time 
commercial property advice in 
Britain will probalby look very 
different. At foe bottom, sur¬ 
veying partnerships will still 
profit, ducking and diving in 
small corners of the market. 
But at the top the big players 
could well be divisions erf large 
US investment banks compet¬ 
ing with one or two US 
property firms. Mr Peacock 
sees little future for the resn 
“The business will polarise 
more. The middle ground will 
be under pressure! They will 
have infrastructure costs, but 
they will not have foe financial 
musde to compete." 


Ship comes in 


1 HAVE here the investment opportu¬ 
nity of a lifetime- It could be a lifetime 
of penury, admittedly. Inter-Acfioma 
children’s charity, is selling 
President, moored on the Thames off 
Victoria Embankment and. if you are 
head ing into foe City, just before^ 
hit the hidden speed cameras under 
Blackfriars Bridge. (You do know 
about the hidden speed cameras 
under Blackfriars Bridge, don't 
you?). The ship was built in 191S, 
originally as a “Q" ship, or anti¬ 
submarine decoy. Christie & Co, 



which is handling foe sale, says it 
could convert into a restaurant and 
bar with an annual turnover of 
£450.000 a year. 

But it is impossible to say what the 
ship *s worth, although foe charity 
has put a hidden reserve on the safe 
— my guess is about £250,0001 but 
don’t take it from me. This is because 
foe owners have to pay an annual 
licence fee to the Part of London 
Authority of about £15.000. Renew¬ 
able each year. So how do you know 
that if your venture is a spectacular 
success, the Authority will not raise 
the fee? "You donX" says Paul 
Donoughue, of Christie, showing 
staring honesty for an estate agent 



rebuilt West London air terminal on 
Cromwell Road. 

Goldstone believes die property 
market has beat over-generalising 
about the effect of the financial trou¬ 
bles in the Far East Conditions are 
different in Hong Kang or Singapore 
from the worsr-affecred countries 
such as Indonesia or Thailand, and 
there is still cash rattling around in 
places. The development will be 
ready by ti» end of the year, and it 
seems buyers are taking a longer 
view. "What foty were saying was 
that the turmoil is going to be over by 
then in any event" We shall see. 


fond and the almost defunct London 
d Continental Railways. Not that 
this should put you off, of course. 


Allatsea:ucfaaxi| 

ah rad for HMS i 


Q an invitation to SBC Warburg 
Dillon Read - surely, pm of the 
name must drop off soon? — to dis- 
. cuss the privatisation of the Mexican 
. Airport Authority. Two things are 
certain, even before I enquire further. 

■ They will be after some of your 
money, and somewhere af the bottom 
Of it will be David Freud, that scion 
of the Freud dynasty who got a prop¬ 
erjob in the City rather than electing 
to promote celebrity non-entities or 
write about their dysfunctional fam¬ 
ily. J last came across Freud when he 
was trying to sell me Vienna airport, 
burl.recall Warburg’s other success- 

■ es include Eurotunnel, Euro Disney- 


What slump? 

RUMOURS of the demise of foe 
London property market may be pre¬ 
mature. David Goldstone, chairman 
of Rejplian Properties, has just re¬ 
turned from a three-week promotion¬ 
al visit to Hong Kong and Singapore, 
timed to coincide with the Chinese 
new year. 

The trip was planned last year and 
had therefore to be downplayed more 
than somewhat. Except that by the 
time Goldstone had left the Far East, 
he had sold HOinfifion-wonh of flats 
at his Point West development, the 


U DAVID BROUGHAM is the Brit¬ 
ish banker charged with knocking 
heads together in Indonesia, the 
most de-dawed of the former Asian 
tigers , we learn. The name rings a 
vague bell. Indeed, it is the same 
Brougham who was involved in the 
rescue of Brent Walker, George 
Walker's old leisure empire. As the 
man charged with breaking the news 
to Walker that hb time on the board 
was.up. “A bit evasive, he didn’t like 
committing himself. Life most bank¬ 
ers ," was one insider's recollection. 
And 1 would be evasive if l had been 
sent into the ring with George 
Walker. 


Omnicom. Saatchi & Saatchi has 
poached Beverly Okuda and Keith 
Burnell from GGTs New York agen¬ 
cy. Wells BDDP. These two were 
running the $50 million account for 
Oil of Olay (as they call it in the US) 
which walked our of the door a few 
weeks ago. So Jet me get this right. 
Okuda and Burnell quarrelled with 
Frank Assumma. Now Assumma is 
suing Greenlees and foe rest of GGT. 
So the rwo left because they fell out 
with Assumma, who then fell out 
wifo Jus former employer, ye! they 
are still gone. A disputatious busi¬ 
ness, advertising. Just as well that 
Greenlees enjoys leaving parties. 

Martin Waller 


Love of Mike 

YET more trouble for Mike Green¬ 
lees, chairman of GGT Group, who 
has agreed a 043million takeover by 



“We’re saved! PizzaExpress 
is opening a branch here" 


ANALYSIS 31 


MARKETING 


The search 
for a brand 
new name 


P erhaps one of the 
hardest tasks faring 
Jan JLeschly and Sir 
Richard Sykes as they pon¬ 
der foe proposed merger 
between SmithKJine Bee- 
chum and Glaxo Wellcome 
will he what to call this 

juggernaut of the pharma¬ 
ceuticals industry. 

SmithKline Beecham 
Glaxo Wellcome is dearly 
out of foe question. Either a 
couple of names will have to 
go or foe identity consul¬ 
tants will have to devise a 
completely new name. 

Before anything is derid¬ 
ed. however, there will be 
lengthy discussions on the 
type of font used, to the 
colour of the logo. Having 
been through the turmoil of 
mergers before, both com¬ 
panies take corporate identi¬ 
ty very seriously. 

UK businesses spend about 
£150 million a year buying 
advice on how to brand 
themselves. The design agen¬ 
cies that dreamt up names 
such as CordianL Centrica 
and BA's new budget airline. 
Go!, are enjoying a boom, 
with financial services, phar¬ 
maceutical and IT sectors 
spearheading the growth. 

Richard Watson, a part¬ 
ner at Global Design Regis¬ 
ter. which helps companies 
to find agencies, says foe 
sector is growing for a 
number of reasons not least 
foe current spate of mergers 
and acquisitions. “At foe 
moment you've got a lot of 
chief executives, marketing, 
and communications direc¬ 
tors asking themselves: 
‘With the arrival of foe new 
millennium, isn't it time for 
a change in our identity?*" 
The process by which a 
company arrives at a name 
stems from a number of 
factors. A strong brand, or 
one with a distinct heritage, 
will almost always survive a 
change. Some times names 
are dictated by historical 
circumstances. For example, 
in 1996 when Sun Alliance, 
the insurer, took over Royal 
Insurance, foe marketers 
were unwilling to give up 
the well-known “Royal" la¬ 
bel. So now we have the 
Royal & SunAiliance. 

O. that it were always so 
easy, for wifo a name comes 
baggage. All too often corpo¬ 
rate branding becomes an 
issue of pride as executives of 
merging companies try to 
cling to the last vestiges of 
their company's identity. 

Tony Allen, managing di¬ 
rector of Interbrand Newell 
& Sorrell, the design and 
identity consultant, worked 
on the identity borne out of 


the 1996 merger between 
Pharmacia, foe Swedish 
company, and Upjohn of 
USA. I n the end it was a sim¬ 
ple and relatively painless 
marriage: Pharmacia & Up¬ 
john. But even there emo¬ 
tions ran high. As Allen re¬ 
calls; “A name goes right to 
the heart of the business. It 
affects everyone from the lop 
to foe bottom so you can’t do 
it without stirring emo¬ 
tions." little wonder tem¬ 
pers fray. A company's corp¬ 
orate identity marks the 
start of its marketing 
communications. 

For tbe workforce, the 
City, the press and the 
public alike, your name is 
the first experience of a 
company's brand attributes. 
It can. for example, signal 
international ambition — 
British Telecom rebranded 
as BT. So when, after seven 
months of research in 35 
countries at a cost of 
£250.000. Guinness and 
Grand Metropolitan re¬ 
vealed its new incarnation 
as Diageo last October, 
many thought they had got 
it ludicrously wrong. It 
called to mind more an 
Italian footballer than a 
worldwide empire spanning 
everything from burgers to 
stout. Diageo might have 
succeeded in meeting the 
two vital criteria of a new 
identity, namely, to attract 
and differentiate, but at 
what cost? 

“Of course you expect a bit 
of flak." says the head of 
media relations, Murray 
Loake. “But it's now a part 
of City life. We couldn't have 
called it Guinness; neither 
could we have named it 
Burger King because it 
wouldn't be correctly repre¬ 
senting the whole story (of 
the company's operations).” 
To be fair. Diageo had to 
draw a line. It was forced to 
compromise and adopt a 
new identity, or risk offend¬ 
ing either Guinness or 
GrandMet shareholders 
had it chosen a composite 
name. The adverse publicity 
Diageo encountered was. in 
part, caused by a perception 
within foe business com¬ 
munity that corporate iden¬ 
tity is an overrated and 
expensive discipline. 

One European bank, cur¬ 
rently going through a 
merger, asked four London 
identity consultants to de¬ 
vise a name almost over¬ 
night for just £5.000 for a job 
normally expected to take !8 
months and cost up to 
£500.000. 

JULIAN LEE 


If you want to find your way through 


frf r " ra " r ’ ** 



... you should be calking to us. 


Corporate • Construction 
Employment • Intellectual Property 
• Litigation • Pensions • Property 


Rowe & Maw 


LAWYERS FOR BUSINESS 

20 Black Friars Lime, London EC4V 6HD 
Telephone 01712484282 


WtfttS 




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35 



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EQUITY PRICES 33 ^ 


THE TIMES TUESDAY FEBRUARY 101998 


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ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES 



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34 ARTS DANCE 


THE TIMES TUESDAY FEBRUARY 101998 


The boys get into a Viennese whirl 


Donald Hutera 

meets the six 
members of 
an all-male 
troupe with 
a silly name and 
a new show 


O n a chill January 
afternoon, six lads 
in sweatpants are 
confined to a large 
room near London Bridge. 
Some stand in frozen isolation, 
heads tilted, arms bent and 
fingers spiderishly splayed. 
Others swat the air. clutch one 
another with twisted tender¬ 
ness, then lurch away. Each 
casts out a disturbingly in¬ 
tense gaze, as if acutely aware 
of an imaginary audience. 

Despite the bizarre behav¬ 
iour, this strangely moving 
sextet aren't care in the com¬ 
munity candidates. Rather, 
they are members of Lea An¬ 
derson's all-male contempo¬ 
rary dance group, the Feather- 
slonehaughs . (pronounced 
Fanshaws). working on the 
timing of their new show. 

The company has gained a 
loyal following for its playful 
and sensitive reinvention of 
men in dance. The Feather- 
stonehaughs Draw on the 
Sketch Books of Egon Schiele 
is their tenth-anniversary pro¬ 
duction and. because of die 
vagaries of binding, their first 
in three years. Anderson 
claims it is one of the hardest 
things she has ever done. 

“It'S so unmanageable." she 
wails, huddled in the rehears¬ 
al studio, stopwatch in hand. 
"But I wanted to put myself in 
a different positioa where 1 
can’t rely on models I've 
already used.” 

Unconventionality is a hall¬ 
mark of Anderson’s choreog¬ 
raphy. whether for the 
Featherstonehaughs or their 
equally quirky older “sisters’’, 
the all-female Cholmondeleys 
(Chumleez). Anyone familiar 




mm 


mm 












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f.r-r..s?.* 






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Take three boys: of th^IFeathers ^ ^ (from left) Dem^urEd^e 


Nixon, original team member Frazik Block! and long-serving Stephen Kirkham 


with either troupe knows bet¬ 
ter than to expect classical 
body shapes or pretty-pretty 
stage pictures horn them. In¬ 
stead. peculiarly precise pat¬ 
terns, swift oddball rhythms 
and dry. ironic wit are the 
order of the day. 

Doubtless Anderson’s cre¬ 
ative background helped to 
determine her kinetic style. 
Before becoming a dance- 
maker. she was both band 


singer and art school student 
In the past, her magpie men¬ 
tality has resulted in live and 
filmed pieces influenced by 
cinema, celebrity, magazine 
graphics, sports, ethnic dance, 
alchemy, weather and political 
identity. 

This time round she has 
fused her unique aesthetic 
with that of the Viennese artist 
Egon Schiele. A contemporary 
of Freud, he was a prodigious¬ 


ly talented self-dramatist with 
a painfully vulnerable, frankly 
erotic vision of humanity. His 
speciality was partially nude 
figures, wraith-llke yet over¬ 
ripe, who seem caught in a 
sort of rapturous despair. 
Mannered and morbid, 
Schiele's once-notorious work 
ended in 1918 with his prema¬ 
ture death from influenza, 
aged 28- 

Stumbling across a repro¬ 


duction of his many sketch¬ 
books, Anderson felt an imme¬ 
diate kinship. She too is an 
inveterate notebook-keeper, 
regularly compiling votumes 
of ideas, drawings and found 
images. Beyond that, some of 
Schiele’s sketches — particu¬ 
larly his little drawings of 
figures in proscenium-like 
boxes — strongly suggested 
choreography. 

“What if these were the Tost 


dances' of Egon Schiele?" An¬ 
derson remembers wonder¬ 
ing- “Since he took such care 
and trouble to make them, die 
least I could do was transform 
them from the page to the 
stage.” In examining Schiele's 
art what appealed most to 
Anderson was “the idea of 
expressed feeling on the out¬ 
side of the body. There’s such a 
rawness and sense of exposure 
in his work." 


WhBe the show is in no way 
meant to be interpreted as 
biography, Anderson recog¬ 
nises the impossibility of sev¬ 
ering this particular artist 
from his art “If you’ve got 
such a strong, stylised view of 
the world," she says, “every¬ 
thing you do is a self-portrait 
— even women and land- 


“I khowevoyox will as¬ 
sume rm taking responsibility 


for portraying toe essence of 
Schiele," she continues, “and 
ttn not 1 jusr subjected his 
sketchbooks to my own rules. 
But every single positi on you ll 
see will "have crane from a 
painting or sketch afius.” 

How do the Featoerstone- 
haughs view Schiele? “The 
stow is inspired by die physi- 
cality of bis work." Rem lee 
says, “but ifs not about hun." 

“In the end, it’s about as," 
adds Stephen Kirkham. 

Lee is compact Kirkham 
sturdy. Their differences typify 
what it means to be one of 
Anderson’s dancers! Ithas far 
more to do with individuality 
than traditional dance tech¬ 
nique. 

A dventure in Motion 
Pictures' Matthew 
Bourne was a found¬ 
ing member of the 
Featherstonehaughs. So was 
the late Carl Smith, wh o cited 
Sean Cannery as his major 
dance influence. Of the cur¬ 
rent lot, only lanky Frank 
Bock is bran the original team, 
but Kirkham, Lee and the lfthe 

Dan O'Neill have been around 
almost as long. 

■ The newest company re¬ 
cruits are Eddie -Nixon and 
Taira SilvestrinL Anderson 
pays the farmer a high ccgnpli- 
ment when die says: “He was 
bam to be a Beatoerstone- 
haugh." Fra his part, Nixon 
compares joining the group to 
“suddenly becoming a mem¬ 
ber of a family. There’s a 
whole movement and beha¬ 
vioural language among a 
group of people who*ve been 
together this long. You have to 
. &nd your way into that world 
and see-bow you fit in.” . 

As lira Sflvestrini, his eerie 
resemblance to Schiele makes 
. him superlatively cast in this 
piece. “But really,” Anderson 
says, “they’re ail Egon 
Schiele.” 

• The Featherstonehaughs per- 
form tonight at the Liverpool 
Everyman (0151-709 4776) and 
1 open the Spring Loaded festival at 
London's Place Theatre on Feb 24- 
Other dates include Cardiff (Feb 
. EL). Tewkesbury (Feb 14), Leicester 
(Feb 19-20) and. Brighton (Mar 3). 
The tour continues until March 27 


MUSIC: Hilary Finch sings the praises of a charity’s primary school initiative that is already defying government plans. Plus classical concert reviews 


Who wants children 
to raise their voices? 


Fv t 


I n 195S the composer 
Zolfan Kodaty gave a 
radio talk in which he 
looked back to his work with 
Bart6k at the start of the new 
century. "The vision of an 
educated Hungary, reborn 
from the people, rose before 
us," he said. “We decided to 
devote our lives to its realisa¬ 
tion." The first thing they did 
was to publish a collection of 
folksongs. Then they set up a 
radical programme for daily 


musical training m primary 
schools. 

As the next new century 
approaches, we in Britain 
seem to perceive things rather 
differently. Indeed, if David 
Blunkett wanted to sideline 
music from the primary cur¬ 
riculum with immediate effect, 
rather than simply in two 
years' time, he would have 
very little difficulty. For de¬ 
spite the national curriculum's 
present declaration of each 



child’s statutory entitlement to 
a music education, the great 
majority of our primary 
schools are silenL With £40 
million cut from music teach¬ 
ing budgets in the past three 
years, too many schools lack 
the resources, the skills — 
above all toe sheer confidence 
—to include music for even the 
recommended hour a week. 

But a new organisation 
called the Voices Foundation 
plans to make things much 
more difficult for the Govern¬ 
ment For those who have ears 
to hear, a gentle humming is 
in the air. 

Seven years ago a music 
teacher railed Susan Digby 
went on a Churchill Fellow¬ 
ship to study with Pfcler Erdei. 
director of the Kodaty Institute 
in Kecskemet. What she saw 
there, and in primary schools 
throughout Hungary, “came 
as a thunderbolt It was total 
enlightenment" 

F rom that moment, Dig¬ 
by became convinced 
that the single most 
valuable tool in primary edu¬ 
cation was music. She felt 
there was an urgent need for a 
national body to support 
teachers who had lost their 
way, as well as those who had 
never found it. In the course of 
her search for trustees, and 
much energetic networking, 
she met a man called Michael 
Stocks, who had studied for 
himself how the Koddly sys¬ 
tem worked in the US and. 
while working as a music 
adviser for Somerset had 
collected 2,000 English 
folksongs and bound them 
together into a resource book 
for primary schools called 
Growing with Music. 

Digby appointed Stocks as 
her director of curriculum and 
training, and the Voices Foun¬ 
dation was bom. For no more 
than £15 per child per year the 
foundation, a registered chari¬ 
ty. offers schools a one-year 
programme based on a vast 
repertoire of song. Seventy-six 
schools throughout Britain are 
already involved, and the 
Foundation aims to reach 
24*00 schools within the next 
decade. Teachers, who receive 
both initial and in-service 
training, begin with an armful 
of songs — children's own 
songs, simple, pentatonic 
tried and tested. And through 
these songs they begin to find 
each child’s own singing voice 
to match rather than impose 


• Rkhard Cork's Visual Arts 
column mil appear on these 
pages tomorrow 



Sort the men from the boys 

A debate is currently rag¬ 
ing in a specialist jour¬ 
nal about the relative 


All together. Susan Digby and two young singing stars 


pitch: to discover pulse: to 
distinguish it from rhythm. 

Both Digby and Stocks are 
obsessed with the primacy of 
the human voice. As Stocks 
observes: “For too long we’ve 
been dazzled by instruments. 
If you start with the voice, you 
are the sound, you are the 
instrument, a musical instru¬ 
ment, like a calculator, is 
outside yourself. Both are 
important — bur at a later 
stage." 

At Oakfield Primary School 
in Rugby, the Voices Founda¬ 
tion programme was intro¬ 
duced last September to a 
school with 47 per cent spatial 
needs pupils, dogged by pover¬ 
ty and low expectations. The 
head teacher. Heather Field¬ 
ing. fell that, through singing, 
they could raise the children's 
self-esteem. After just one 
term, listening and speaking 
skills had improved and. at the 
requesr of parents who had 
hitherto refused to come near 
the school, a weekly parents' 
choir had been formed. 


At Oxford Gardens Primary 
in North Kensington, where 
the programme has been run¬ 
ning for four years, every class 
readier in this inner-city 
school of 24 languages now 
sings. And. says the head Liz 
Rayment-Pickard. ‘‘it’s 
.changed the school dramati¬ 
cally. Everything is much 
calmer. The children have 
learnt to listen to each other, to 
have the confidence to sing 
solo. And these skills are very 
easily transferred into learn¬ 
ing to read and work in 
maths." 

Conversely, of course, 
Shakespeare knew all too well 
what happened to those who 
had no music in their souls. 
Sir Peter Hall has recently 
spoken out passionately about 
fus vision of a nation without 
adequate provision for the arts 
as a "dumb nation". In the 
case of music, that is literally 
true. The Voices Foundation is 
giving the nation back its 
voice. Any government will 
suppress it at its peril. 


THE last time Mario 
Venzago came to Symphony 
Hall he brought a Bruckner 
symphony with him. This 
time hfa'programme with 
the City of Birmingham 
Symphony O r ch e st r a could 
hardly have been more dif¬ 
ferent It is true thar it began 
with music by Bruckner's 
idol. Richard Wagner, but it 
went on from there to Ravd, 
whose aesthetic was the very 
antithesis of theirs, and to 
Honegger, who had rather 
more time for Wagner, but 
not that much. 

The impression the Swiss 
conductor left, however, was 
much the same as before. He 
is a benign rather than a 
dynamic influence, effective 
in guiding an orchestra that 
has got into its stride but not 
so good at getting dungs 
started or sustaining the 
pressure where it is liable to 
fail. Honegger’s Mouvement 
symphonique No 1: Pacific 


Struggle 
to get 
going 



231. was a vivid example: 
Once it had got going, it 
thundered along & track 
most impressively. The be¬ 
ginning of the piece, on the 
other hand, had little of the 
vital sense of energy just 
waiting to be released and at 
ate point the performance 
threatened to run out of 

steam. The same composer's 

Mouvement symphonique 
No 3 was well characterised 
in the dramatic opening 


A debate is currently rag¬ 
ing in a specialist jour¬ 
nal about the relative 
advantages of women's and 
boys’ voices as toe-top line in 
choral music Since one of the 
most vigorous proponents of 
the latter is — not surprisingly 
— the director of the Choir erf 
New College. Oxford. Edward 
Higginbottaro, and since that 
choir sings for the King's 
Consort, the debate is topical 
It is a particularly relevant 
discussion in the case of Han¬ 
del’s . oratorio Belshazzar, 
because here the composer 
deploys his choral farces with 
special virtuosity: represent¬ 
ing in turn resilient Jews, seif- 
confident Persians and riotous 
Babylonians, the chorus has to 
run tire gamut from martial 
swagger to drunken orgy. 
New College Choir is wefl- 
drilled. admirably blended 
and able to supply two very 
satisfactory small character 
parts from among its ranks. 
But it would be idle to pretend 
that even this fine chair had 
cbe resources fully to project Its 
multifaceted role. 

That, however, was only one 
of the reasons Wednesdays 
performance took so long to 
catch fire. There were some 
good things in the first part 
Neal Davies dragging toe 
“painful weary life" of toe 
Babylonian defector Gobrias 
in a grief-oppressed melodic 
line; toe-King's Consort can¬ 
tering neatly and efficiently 
through number after num¬ 
ber. But in spite of King's 
generous gesturing, there was 
little sense of phrases being 
sculpted, of paragraphs un¬ 
folding, of arama injected, 
fndeed, the motor of the 
performance seemed to be the 


sections but, in spite of toe 
melodious saxophone sola 
failed in interest some time 
before the epilogue wasover. 

Venzago's most successful 
achievement was in Ravels 
La Valse, where toe rhythms 
were supple, the string-play¬ 
ing voluptuous and the in¬ 
toxicated animation of the 
second half of toe piece 
authentically alannmg-R^*- 
ei's pfano Concerto in 
begun uncertainly and the 
soloist, Anne Queffetec. 
seemed unable to! fold the 
confidence that would have 
allowed her effectively." to 
offset her primly articulated 
Adagio in the quidor move¬ 
ments on either side. The 
orchestra was happier in 
Siegfried’s Rhine Journey 
and Funeral A torch which, 
after another uncertain start, 
achieved all due-heroism m 
sound and stature - ‘ 

Gerald Larner 


- :v I 


splendid continuo section, 
powered by the dynamic Rich¬ 
ard Egarr on harpsichord,-; 
spreading 'and' ornamenting i. 
arpeggios with razziedazzle, . 
but always stylish brilliance. - 
Just what was missing be- : , 
came evident in toe second 
part, when James Bowman, as 
Daniel, stepped forward, at 
Belshazzar's ruddy interrupt¬ 
ed feast, to. interpret the enig¬ 
matic writing on toe walL 
Lowering his score. Bowman . 


actually addressed the- king: 
the first moment of dramatic 
verisimilitude in toe whole 
evening. Belshazzar soon dis¬ 
appeared, but Bowman con¬ 
tinued to hold toe stage, - 
After this, bothLynne Daw¬ 
son (Nitocris) and Catherine 
Doitey (Ctyrus) seemed to 
warm to their parts. Neal 
Davies delivered another fine 
aria and James Gilchrist, dear 
of diction and alert in phras¬ 
ing, won thoroughly deserved 
plaudits for his late substitu¬ 
tion in the title role. 

Barry 

Millington 


TIMES 


J* (M 





See bands 
for free. 




,*» . - 

! Wfrrtire etencs to ste top tra.ufc.witb metre 

Freetn The Times ihis-Satorday. 


PEPSIt 






































THE TIMES TUESDAY FEBRUARY 10 1998 __ 

What’s a nice girl 
like her doing 
on the shelf? 

Have no fear - Joan Cusack is only slightly like the character 
she plays in the hit comedy In & Out. Matt Wolf reports 

C omedy is traditionally the Hollywood can be a really over- live, not in Los Angeles or Nw 
bridesmaid at any awards whelming and mtnmdating experi- York™ but Chicago, not far from ih< 
ceremony, so it is some- ence; it really is a planet suburban town of Evanston when 
thing of a surprise that Hollywood It's very intense and Cusack and her four sittings — ai 


arts film 


C omedy is traditionally the 
bridesmaid at any awards 
ceranony. so it is some¬ 
thing of a surprise that 
Joan Cusack’s performance in In B 
Out as the overweight would-be 
bride to Kevin Kline's “outed" gay 
schoolteacher has received die at¬ 
tention that ir has. In December 
Cusaik was named Best Support¬ 
ing Actress by the New York Fflm 
Critics' Circle, a prize followed up 
by a Golden Globe nomination last 
month (she lost to LA. Confi¬ 
dential's Kim Basinger}- And today 
the actress and older sister of 
Hollywood star John Cusack is 
expected to reappear in the same 
category, alongside Basinger, on 
the Oscar shortlist. 

All this for a performance that 
asks for little more than laughter? 
Of course: not everyone can turn a 
jilted Midwesterner * nuptial dis¬ 
tress into a virtuosic bit of perfor¬ 
mance art. To watch Cusack, in foil 
wedding regalia, drop down in the 
middle of the street and howl “Is 
everybody gay?* is to witness 
hysteria pushed to a hilarious limit 
In a film that tends to promise 
more than it delivers, Cusack 
brings a dizzy spin to the movie's 
didactic and sometimes cloying 
tendencies. 

"I really give credit to Paul 
Ru chuck," Cusack says, referring to 
the screenwriter not just of In & 
Out but of Jeffrey and Addams 
Family Values, the last of which 
featured Cusack as a scheming 
nanny. "It has to be written well 
and cant be silly and goofy in the 
way that sometimes people per¬ 
ceive comic performances to be. 
They just have to be light Paul was 
able to make the part very smart 
and human, to have poignancy as 
well as comedy.” 

However it was accomplished, 
the result has given Cusack, now 
35. her biggest career boost yet in 
the decade since she enlivened 
Mike Nichols* film Working Girt. 
playing Melanie Griffith* secre¬ 
tary-friend with piles of hair. That 
film also brought her an Oscar 
nomination and made her Holly¬ 
wood* discovery of the moment at 
a time when. Cusack feds, she 
wasn’t ready for a spotlight she is 
only really starting to enjoy now. 

*T was so overwhelmed. I didn't 
know how to handle all die stuff,” 
she says. “Just bang part of 


Hollywood can be a really over¬ 
whelming and intimidating experi¬ 
ence: it really is a planet 
Hollywood. It* very intense and 
very powerful, and people are very 
competitive. Back then I didn't have 
any way to try to figure out how to 
shape myself or help myself to be 
presentable in the way I wanted to 
be. I was just young.” 

Her newfound confidence is re¬ 
flected in In & Out, her biggest film 
role to dale. Cusack says she 
auditioned “maybe four times" to 
get the part “I tried to think a led 
about what it would feel like if that 
land of thing happened to me,” she 


C Women 
tend to 
think things 
are their 
problem and 
their fault 5 


says. So hard did she work at 
character identification, in fact that 
she contributed one of the key lines 
of the film, when she asks Kline* 
Howard: “Was there any other 
time you could have told me?" 

Does her character. Emily, not 
realise that the love of her life is 
gay? “You get wrapped up in your 
own things — to her case. losing 
weight malting herself thinner and 
prettier ail the things women tend 
to do to themselves. They think 
things are their problem and their 
fault and that they need to fix 
themselves, and really in this case it 
wasn't her fault at all.” 

Cusack can identify with her 
predicament "l think ive done that 
a million times, where I've thought 
something was wrong with me or I 
wasn't this enough or that enough, 
and itwasTt my fault the guy just 
wasn’t available or just wasn't 
ready to be in a committed relation¬ 
ship, whatever his emotional prob¬ 
lems were." 

For her part Cusack divides her 
time between her flourishing career 
and her life as wife to a corporate 
lawyer and mother to seven-month- 
old sen Dylan. Tellingly, the trio 


live, not in Los Angeles or New 
York, but Chicago, not far from the 
suburban town Of Evanston where 
Cusack and her four sitting — ail 
of them adore, and unrelated to the 
Irish Cusacks — grew up. 

"It* a very kind of modem 
wranan experience." she says. “I 
want a job and a career that are 
meaningful to me and important 
but I also want a family ana a great 
relationship with my husband. 
Having a partner wi th a normal 
kind of job and a stable fife in that 
way. he can say: *Wait a minute; 
that* kind of extreme behaviour 
there' — and there are some very 
ex t rem e behaviours in Hollywood." 



35 m 

'• 1 1 

• r: 1 


•P7j • 


A lthough her famous 

brother John last year co¬ 
wrote and produced his 
own film Grass? Pointe 
Blank (in which Joan took the 
small role of yet another secretary, 
her de facto screen speciality). 
Cusack speaks ambivalently of 
going the Demi Moore route of 
initiating her own screen work. 
"Anyone in any job wants to be able 
to choose, and help to make what 
you do for a living enjoyable. If you 
have a lot of power you may have 
more opportunity to do that, but 
sometimes you have less; some¬ 
times you don't get people around 
you who really tell you the truth. 
That brings its own set of circum¬ 
stances with tt" 

Instead, she is working up a TV 
sitcom for CBS to be shot in 
Chicago, and speaks of wanting to 
return to the theatre, having led 
Off-Broadway productions of 
Cymbeline (as Imogen, the central 
character) and the New York 
premiere of Jim Cartwright* Road. 
complete with a Lancastrian ac¬ 
cent: “I came to England and hung 
out for awhile and tried to really 
get if* 

For now. however, she* back in 
Washington DC filming “a serious 
part” in a mystery, Arlington 
Road, with Jeff Bridges and Ttm 
Robbins, and awaiting Oscar night 
on March 23. “Hopmdfy I wQl 
enjoy the ceremony this time, or at 
least try to enjoy it," site says. “It* 
sad if it just gets to be about 
winning, you know? I mean, I’Ve 
had a great year, a wonderful baby, 
a great part in a film: at that point, 
you've won so much already." 

• In & Oat opens on Frith# 


r. uv A: 







* Vi V- r <• 

-j j, . , ; 

* • - • •• 


Joan Cusack adorns the mantle of stardom: her role as the bride jilted by a gay man in In & Out has put her In Oscar contention 


An admirably arranged marriage 

D espite being billed as Orchestra. True, both the a jazz world less interested in ^ 
part of the Barbican* conductor. Maria Schneider, the accident of a musician* 
current inventing and the principal soloist, saxn- birth than in his commitment 


A t tite age of 27, tie 
American pianist 
Geoff Keezer has more 
professional experience than 
many players twice his age, 
Chris Parker writes. When he 
was 18 he had both made his 
recording debut as a leader 
and become the last occupant 
tt the piano stool in Art 
Blakey* hard-bop academy, 
the Jazz Messengers. He was 
signed to Blue Note at 19 and 
has since worked with mature 
masters such as trumpeter Art 
Farmer and with his own 
generation’s jazz stare: saxo¬ 
phonist Joshua Redman, bass¬ 
ist Christian McBride singer 
Diana Krall, all tt whom 
appear on his latest album. 
Turn up the Quiet. 

This album provided the 
basis for his trio appearance at 
Pizza Express (Dean Sreet, 
Wl). The album* first track, 
the swing classic Stompin' at 
the Souqy, was his opener, 
giving him the opportunity to 
warm up with some of hi s 
trademark splashily percus¬ 
sive soloing aver a slow- 
boiling rhythm section com¬ 
prising bassist James Genus 
and drummer Gary Husband. 
His next selection, however. 


D espite being billed as 
part of the Barbican* 
current Inventing 
America festival, this event 
celebrated the work of a Cana¬ 
dian — Toronto-born compos¬ 
er and arranger Gil Evans — 
interpreted by a European big 
band: the Danish Radio Jazz 


Orchestra. True, both the 
conductor. Maria Schneider, 
and the principal soloist, saxo¬ 
phonist David Sanborn, are 
American, but tite abiding 
impression left at the evening* 
end was that 77ie Legacy of Gil 
Evans, as the concert was 
billed, had been bequeathed to 


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12 February-17 May 

Sponsored by 

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For advance tickets to this major 
exhibition of paintings by Pierre Bonnard 
call First Cali on 0171420 0055. 

Tickets: £8.60/£5.5O inc. booking fee. 
Booking open now. 


a jazz world less interested in 
the accident of a musician* 
birth than in bis commitment 
to a universal language. 

Evans* music, from his 
arrangements far MDes Davis 
tt Falla and Gershwin to his 
own varied, often rock-laced 
compositions, is not easy to 
{day. and the DRJO negotiat¬ 
ed the trickiest of its waters 
with aplomb and not a tittle 
passion. 

The concert began, though, 
not with one tt Evans* pieces, 
but with a Schneider composi¬ 
tion whose exquisite distilla¬ 
tion tt her mentor* music is 
neatly encapsulated in its tide 
Evanescence. Embracing an 
Evansesque floating, plangent 
waft a nxky. guitar-led pas¬ 
sage ami a tender, muted 
trumpet solo, it set the con¬ 
cert* tone perfectly by viewing 
Evans* music both as a 
treasure in itself, and — more 
importantly — also as an 
enduring source of inspiration 
for jazz* current practitioners. 

Sanborn* role necessarily 
involved his playing parts. 


particularly those from Porgy 
and Bess and Sketches of 
Spain, firmly associated with 
Miles Davis, but it is paying 
Sanborn the highest compli¬ 
ment to acknowledge that, 
once the asmngency of his 
sound had been assimilated, 
the ear quickly stopped listen¬ 
ing for his illustrious predeces¬ 
sor* uniquely evocative, 
pierring but vulnerable trum¬ 
pet and simply revelled in the 
alto* fluency and eloquence. 

Such concerts, when they 
work — and this was a 
flawless performance from all 
concerned — do a great deal 
more than push nostalgks’ 
pleasure buttons: they keep 
alive, in a way taken res’ 
granted in the classical world 
but still relatively rare in jazz 
(always a little suspicious of 
repertory music), the apprecia¬ 
tion tt the genius tt masters 
past. 

Chris Parker 


Diamond Keezer 


Bjjork* Venus as a Bay, sud¬ 
denly transformed the trio 
from unplugged modem 
mainstreamers into an electric 
band, Keezer utilising an addi¬ 
tional keyboard for colour and 


contrast, Genus a six-string 
bass guitar to give a bit more 
bite to the sound. 

Two love songs followed, the 
first a luxuriantly stow visit to 
Hoagy Carrakhad* The 


Nearness of You; the second 
an originaf called Island Pal¬ 
ace, inspired by Okinawan 
folk music and featuring 
Keezer* lyrical piano over 
Genus* insistent, chugging 
electric bass. From here on in, 
the trio moved easily between 
post-bop acoustic workouts 
and contemplative ballads. 


|| BUILDING A LIBRARY: DON G 

ilOVANNI | 

i 

A connoisseur’s guide to the best avail; 
1 compact disc, presented in conjunction 

able recordings on 
l with BBC Radio 3 


MOZARTS DON GIOVANNI 

rTanl— lM if * - 

nvmnKi oy 

John nuBiildgs 

T here are 32 current re¬ 
cordings tt Mozart* 
Don Giovanni. Two are 
legendary: Fritz Busch* 1936 
Gfyndebourne recording and 
the live New York Metropoli¬ 
tan Opera performance con¬ 
ducted by Bruno Walter in 
1942. Walter assembled some 
of the leading Mozart ringers 
tt tite day, including the 
magnificent Ezio Pinza as tite 
Don and Alexander Krpnis as 
LeporeUa, who set one another 
alight in a performance bris¬ 
tling with vitality and 
humour. 

Furtwangler* little-known 
1950 Salzburg performance 
had Tito Gobbi in the title rale. 
Gobbi* baritone is more flexi¬ 
ble than Cesare Siepi* famous 
bass in the better-known 1954 
Salzburg performance, bur 
both recordings are maned by 
excessive on-stag: noise and 


Furrwangkr* overly sym¬ 
phonic approach. 

Among the many studio 
recordings, only a few stand 
out. One of the most enduring 
is Joseph Krips’s from the 
mid-1950s, with a feast of good 
singing from Cesare Siepi. 
Lisa Della Casa and Anton 
Dermota. Otto Klempere r* 
Beethovenian thoroughness is 
not to everyone* taste, but his 
profound sympathy with Mo¬ 
zart* score brings out much of 
its enigmatic detail. 

Among the performances on 
period instruments. Arnold 
Ostman’s and Roger 
N omng ton* are notable far 
their acute sense of pace. 
Ostman* version is better, 
dancing its vnty towards the 


demise tt Don Giovanni, but 
without quite catching the 
ex ci t e ment of the climax. 

However, the weightier 
voices in Carlo Maria 
GmlinTs 1959 recording win it 
the palm. Eberhard Waechter, 
Gottlob Frick, Joan Suther¬ 
land and Elisabeth Sch¬ 
warzkopf give it the 
momentum it needs to rise to 
the tragic high-point tt the 
Don*death. The performance 
has warmth and rich detail 
that make the evil in the heart 
tt the hero all the more 
shocking when it emerges. 
GhiKni and his engineers also 
created a highly differentiated 
range tt sound that makes this 
a recording to be treasured 
(EMI CDS 5 56232-2 £46,99). 


• To order the recommended recording, with free delivery, 
please send a cheque payable to The Times Music Shop to 
FREEPOST. SCO68L Forres. IV360BR or plume 0345 023408; 
email: music6the-times.CD.uk 

• Nest Saturday on Radio 3 (9am): Monteverdis !] Combat- 
timeoto di Tancredi e Ctorinda 





















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36 ARTS THEATRE 


THE TIMES TUESDAY FEBRUARY 101998 



LONDON 


AMERICAN SAMPLER: The 

CHjidd.’KSni; soprano BartMie Hendiwte 
jouii Ole New worM Symcihwr, 
Or-ywstrs r.in.Jef Mchaei risen Thomas 
ror .3 p°rlonTidr^:c }l Barter's K nowHe 
Summer of 1$15 in ihis ins! in a senes pr 
eonam-ji -iemng oui to capture the 
pi'Drvxong i.pini oi American rtar.srol 
rompown TH; programme aJw 
looUres, Charles l-.-es end John Adams 
Bartilcan. aik Street. cGj (0171-638 
B0*li Tonight. 730pn> © 




A dally gutide to arts 
andentwilainmerrt 
compiled by Merit H angle 


ELSEWHERE 


CAUSE C ELFR HE RattcanS last 
play, a bathe oi moral aTtiiuOCs between 
Alma RanenCnjry and a woman in the 
tiny wing Ha tor ihe murder gl her 
oWcrly husband Ned Banter. directs 
ihb arvjr,- assesaronl d 1930s 

hypsatsy 

Lyric. Kras SlreeOV5(Otflt-WIJ3tU. 
Opens lonighr. 7 30pm Then l\4on-SaL 
7 30pm. ma: Sal. 2.30pm. Until April 4 


CAMBRIDGE: The acclaimed yorng 
soprano Amanda B-aoaciH >oirc the 
London Mozart Players under its 
musK director Manillas Bn men ID 
periwm ocera anas Mozan and 
Handel. The predominamiy lomarwt 
programme also includes' SibeGvs's 
passionate riigrpfeto&ort tie legend 
a! Peteis end MMsande and 
Boeihouen's Symphony No 4 
Com Exchange. Whecfr.H Street 
(01223 3578S1) Tonight, 7 30pm ft) 


CHESTER MarrCampi. Randal Hertsy 
and Susan TomoB in Alan Bennpifs 

cfeww doubfc-Cuil OfUtx Sorts, 

showing tna age-old hatrfs of office lie 
crumpling as the computer age arrives. 
Gateway, Harnrton Place. Chester 
(01244 3JQ33Z1. Opens loreghi 7 45 pm 
Then Mon-Thu, 7 . 45 pm: Frt and Sal 
apm mate Wed (Fed 25). 2 W" Sat 
(Feb2t).3Dm Until Feb 2d. B 
GLASGOW (Sites HavorgaJ plays (he 
shabDy hero m BreMat's Kropp'a Lest 
Tap®, reptayrg me record ot feeing 
happiness many years whore 
Citizens iStalls Studio). Goit»is (0141- 
429 0022) Free preview Icraghl. 

7 30pm Opens lomorrcw. 7 30pm. 

Then Mon-Sal. 7 30pm 


OF BLESSED MEMORY 5a m 

Brooklyn. George Banner's characters 
include diiteiera seers al Jews. Puerto 
flioans and drug dealers Sflmpses oi 
Irfe or the edge 

King's Hoad' Upper Street M id 171- 
226 1916) Previews hem lomghi Bom 
Opens Feb 16. 7 30pm Than Mon-Sat. 
Bpm: mars Sal and Sun. 3 30pm @ 


SABINA Mew SnooWfaon plav abour 
Jh«? pahenf tSusen VkSlert sjgrjihcjnit,- 
passad on lo .lung (Pool McGannj by 
Fieud iDir.id Ganii Andy Wtoondnects 
Bush. Shophwcfc Bush Grew. WU 
<0131-743 3388) Mon-Sal Spni 


THE SOLDIER'S TALE- The 

ubiquitous Simon CaUow is (be evening's 
nam'oi with me Acaoemv ol 5i Mamn- 
ni-me-FVids Chamtar Ensemble >n a 
seffli-ttaged performance ol 
Straw n&fcv'f masiorpHece It is crec*Med 
by BraruTci s Serenade Ho t Jonathan 
Ah/Srf dire-yj 

Queen Elizabeth Hall. Scum BanK 
SET 10171 - 963 4242) Tomghl, 7 45pm 



READING A CT-venue national Iw* by 
som* ol me country's moa laleffied 
comedians horn London's lamaur. 
Comedy Store louches Clown ban Tim 
C3ark. Sieve Rawlings. Phil Jupltus. 
John Moionev and Mandv Kwqhi are the 
five professionals whose mirthmalong 
sfcds can be aamoled lanaghL while a 
special stot is sei aside tar selected 
amaieure 10 p Ml pnn m tronr ot me 
eyamng's audience. 

Hexagon Theatre. Queen's WaA 

(Dll8960 6080) TomghL Bpm Q 


LONDON GALLERIES 


Barbara Hendricks 
sings at the Barbican 


BarMcan: Shaker The An ol 
Cialtmenshrp (017H538 8891) 

. British Museum: Corner 1900- 
1939 (0171-323 3525) .Dulwich: 
Passion in parting (0181-693 
5334| . Hayward: Henn Cartier - 

Bresson. Europeans . Natkumf- 
Recognising Van Eyck iD17i-747 2885) 
National Portrait Mary 
Woasion 6 walt and Mary Shelley (0171- 
306 00551 . Royal Academy. Ah 

Treasures ot England- The Regional 
Coflections (0171-300 B0001 
SaatcH: Alex (0171-624 82991 .. 
Tata-. Per MrfceOy 10171 -887 80001 . 
Whitechapel: Thomas Schulte (0171- 
522 7888) 


■ ART Pager Aliam. Mick: Ford and 
.lack. Dee m this avoepnonaliy rileresJir^ 
■iama abcui Inendsh^ unspoken 
resaninvni and an airriost an-while 
paininig 

WyndhBiti's. Cnanng Cross Hoad. 

WC2 i 01 71 -358 1 TWi Tue-SaL 3prn. 
maif Wed. 3pm. Sal and Sun. 5pm 


THEATRE GUIDE 


Jeremy Kingston's assessment 
i showing 


onheatre: 


vlng in London 


B BEALfTY AND THE BEAST 

Disney him njmed mio a h J Broadway 
musical JiAe-Alanah Bnghien arri 
Alasdaa Harvey as me leads, wah 
supp.:n Siam trie- likes ol Derek Gnfnths 
and ftorrein Possm-yon. 

Don d n te n. Tonarharfi C^jrt Road. Wt 
tOi 7 1 -4 166 O 6 O 1 Mon-Sat 7 30pm mat 
Sai. 2 »pm 


■ House fidL returns only 
B Same seals available 
□ Seats at aH prices 


B CYRANO DE BERGERAC The 

sell-our BSC prod'JCtion horri Strallord. 
•ntfr Antony Sher as Rosiand's tragic 
romantic hero, m London lor a limned 
season Gregory Doran d«Ms 
Lyric, Sna/tosburyAve. VV1 (017 l-JW 
5054| Mon-Sat. 7 30pm. malt- Wed and 
Sal. 2pm 


□ THE GOLEM Peier Wdl leteHs the 
legend ol HatObi Laevr o< Prague, wh-a 
creared a bang from day iwtft loaitul 
consequcntcei'. The birth ol the 
Frar*ansieln story Produced by 
PcVygW Thear-a Co in as&octjuon with 
Jewish Care,' 

Bridewell, Gnde Lane. EC4 (0171-936 
3456) Cue-Sal. 7 3Upm: mar Sun. 

3 3upm 


■ THE DAY I STOOD STILL 

Impiessw new hewn Syoi play aboui 
me paralysing errecr oi urreguiied 
igay) love (teal carnpamon-ptoce to The 
tn;en;ion o> Love 

National iConestoe). South Bank. SE1 
(017i.928 2252) Today.230pmand 
7 30pw In repertoire © 


B A DELICATE BALANCE Eileen 
Arturs haunungi/ 'ddirng in welcome 
revT^al ol Alroee s piav ^>Out marriage, 
parenthood ^id nen^ibourtine&s 
Maggie Smith plays‘the drunk s»sier 
ArtTiony Page dire-^s 
Theatre Royal. HaymarkeL SW1 
(0171-93080001 Mon-Sal. Bpm: mars 
Wed and Sat. 3pm ® 


□ LAKEBOAT turOfMon prarmew of 
David Mamet's fijy play, dating from 
1970 a rugged Tdice ol lHe at>aard a 
cargo boa) on r);« Great Lakes Aaron 
Muter directs tt;ie oast of etghi tor 
Preiman Produ^ lions 

Lyric Studio King Sire*. 
Harmv2rsmlm.lw6(QiB1-74i 87gi| 
Mon-Sal. 8pmi mat Sel 4 33pm Line! 
February^ ft) 

□ THE MAGISTRATE 1st 

Richaidson pfays the much harassed 
here m a filtuliY funny revival oi Pinero's 
laree Cast includes Graham Crtnvden. 
Frank Mcfdkemass, John Padoen 
Savoy. The Sttand. WC2 (0171-836 
B888) Mon-Sat. 73rjpm. mats Wed and 
Sal. 3pm ft) 


thriller, adapted by Richard I-.ana. who 
plays the cavsler Thwaifes. from Patrick 
Harmtfon's novel The Skaum of 
Soirtuda Jenny Lee directs a co- 
preducuon with Wimbledon sArtc 
Theatre 

Warehouse, Ongwofl Rd. East 
Croydon (0181-680 406D|. Tue. 6 30pm, 
Wed-Sal. 8 pm; mai Sun. 5pm 

□ RICHARD HI Eddie Marion plays 
Oh- yfllamoua hero m Guy Retalad-.'s 
produdfon. set m Ore Easf End's 
gangsMrUndolthe 1980s 
Pleosance Theatre, 40 North Rd. N7 
(0)77-609 IBOOi. Tue-Sar. 730pm. mars 
Thut 2 30pm and Sun. 5pm 

□ ROMEO AND JULIET' Nicholas 
Irons, Ireah out 0 ( drama school, ploys 
optwiitf Kate Rrvlwrotj n Rupert 
Gooid's production ol love and death In 
Verona. Lasl production here before (he 
theatre doses 

Greenwich. Grooms H.H. SE10 [0181- 
8 S 8 77551 Mon-Sal 7.45am: mat Sat 
230pm Unrt March 28 B 


LONG RUNNERS 


□ MISS POACH -S WAR- Chtoe 
Salaman >1 Ihe li'fe roie o( me wartime 


□ Blood Brother* Pboanut (0171-389 

1733) □ Buddy Strand (0171-930 

08001 B Grams' Cambridge 

10171-484 5080) □ Martin Gueitre- 

FYino? Edward (0171-447 5400) .. 

□ Lee MMraMea. Palace (0171 -434 

0909) .. B Mias Sdgon: Drury Lone 
(OT 71-494 5400/ .. u The 
Mousetrap: 9 Martin's (0171-836 
1443) . BORver! Pitedhm (0171- 

494 5020] . ■The Phantom of the 

Opera: Her Majesty's (D171-494 5400) 

. □ Smokey Joe's Cafe Prmce ot 
Wales (0171-839 5967) 

Ticket Urtormanan supplied by Society 
ol London Theatre. 


NEW RELEASES 


CLUBBED TO DEATH (181 A young 
vvoman erpioies ihe rave scene on are 
ourslufts ol Pans Atmospheric bur 
cneikw drama, directed by Yotonde 
Zaubeiman W«i EJodie Boucher, 
Beatnos Dalle. 

Renoir 10171-837 6402) 


MezzerineE) (0181 -315 4215) Virgin 
Troewfcre S10181-9706015) 


Geoff Brown's assessment of 
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THE WINTER GUEST (15) Dutiful re¬ 
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about cnss-ccrwng iriec in a ScotKJi 
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Continental damned 


MARILYN WNGBWJL 


T he Gate launches the 
season of European 
plays it is calling 
Biennale 1998 with 
two short pieces which left me 
feeling that however downcast 
Britain's dramatists may be 
about the prospects for youth 
as the millennium approach* 
es. their counterparts on the 
mainland are glummer stilL 
1 would not recommend a 
young couple to take a trip to 
either the dingy Germany of 
Helmut Krausser’s Leather 1 ' 
face or the drab, wintry Nor> 
way of Jon Fosse's far better 
The Child. After all, the cumu¬ 
lative messa ge is (hat, if the 
Teutonic police don’t get you, 
die Scandinavian gods proba¬ 
bly will. 

“This is the first play its 
author did not destroy,” says 
the publicity for Leather-face; 
and 1 must at least say that I 
admire his forbearance. No 
doubt the piece has a frisson in 
Germany itself, since it is 
based on the case of a Munich 
man who held his girlfriend 
hostage and was shot by 
police. Civil righters reported¬ 
ly saw this as “reintroducing 
the death penalty by the back 
door”. And maybe audiences 
there were prepared to swal¬ 
low Krausser’s claim that it 
deals with “the chronic state of 
panic of the Western world 
gone awry, the resulting 
masks and mutations, the 
complete cancelling out of 
reality in simulation". 

But what we actually see is a 
twerpish youth bickering with 
his girl after he has spent her 
money on a chainsaw and, 
dressed in scarfaoe mask and 
bloody apron, sat down to 
enjoy what presumably is a 
video of The Texas Chainsaw 
Massacre. A neighbour gets 
the wrong idea; a police siege 
starts; and Raul Viragh'S He 
and Katy Carmichael's She. as 
the characters are portentous¬ 
ly called, treat the whole thing 



as a big giggle. This it isnX but 
then it isn't much else either, 
least of all a trenchant com¬ 
ment on our troubled era. All 
Leatherface ends up saying is: 
don’t wave chainsaws at cop¬ 
pers while dressed in monster 
masks and expect to get off 
scot-free. 

Despite what feels like a 
debt to early Pinter and ironic 
references to early Ibsen, The 
Child is a much more original 
piece. Scene I is sec ia a. bus 
shelter occupied by an old 
man {Peter SprouleJ whose 
full-time obsession is collect¬ 
ing empty bodies; a lonely girl 
called Agnes (Sophie Thurs- 
fieki), who always leaves her 
matches at home so as to be 
able to ask strangers for a 
light); and forlorn young Fred¬ 
erick (Andrew Whipp). 

Scene II closets Agnes and 
Fred in their bleak flat with 
her boring mum (Sheila Allen) 
and Scene til has them losing 
their first child in a dour 
hospitaL 

The Child tends to make 
Ingmar Bergman’s or, for that 
matter, Ibsen's Scandinavia 
look like a Californian beach 
party. Yet the flat, repetitive 
dialogue and pale, unsmiling 
faces of Ramin Gray's excel¬ 
lent cast prove more absorb¬ 
ing than Leatherface, as well 
as more successful at creating 
a distinctively contemporary 
feel You are left with the 
impression of baffled, lost 
people haplessly in search of 
— what? Love, God, security, 
understanding, children? At 
times they themselves seem 
scarcely to know. 

Benedict 

Nightingale 






ill 







/*- 






+i. 


. ~ .tv*- 

f V 


d 


Drama with 
feet of clay 



RABBI LOEW probably lived a 
scholarly and blameless life in 16th- 
century Prague, but the legend of die 
Golem has been foisted upon him and. 
like Dr Faustus. the supernatural has 
run away with his name. 

In order to save the inhabitants of 
the ghetto from Jew-baiting Chris¬ 
tians. Loew fashions a man from mud, 
breathes a magic word into him and 
forthwith the Golem, for it is he, roams 
the city spreading terror among the 
wicked Christians. In the manner of so 
many feared technological inventions, 
it then goes out of control, and man 
must learn the folly of dabbling in 
what is God's prerogative. 

So far. so good as a stimulus for 
spine-chilling tales equipped with a 
firmly conservative message. But what 
does Peter Wolfs play make of it? First 
of all. his succession of simple scenes 
does none of the things the pro¬ 
gramme note tells us they will, other 
than to suggest that the Golem 
represents our worst fears. Even this, 
which has theatrical possibilities, is 
limited to Loew's dismay after raising 
his hand against his own daughter — 


ie seeking, albeit briefly, to destroy 
what he loves. 

Where is the whirlwind of the 
elements when Maxwell Hutcheon’s 
Loew and his assistants create the 
monster? One doesn’t ask for flames 
or toppling scenery from a small- 
budget production, but a tittle alarm 
is called for. Mere disbelief is what 
greets the yard-long day model, more 
Homunculus than Golem. In later 
scenes, before we see its fully grown 
form, the cast bend tbdr necks back as 
though the menace is 50ft high. But it 
tains out to be played by the actor who 
has taken tile role of Brother Thadde- 
us, the worst of the Jews’ persecutors. 
This scores high marks for psychology 
but zero for fright 

Hutcheon conveys the other- 
woridiness of Loew, but finds it 
difficult to switch into avenger mode. 
Catherine Cusack plays his daughter 
with her characteristic walk, as 
though shoulders get their instruc¬ 
tions fractionally after hips, suggest¬ 
ing adolescent honesty. As the ghetto 
prostitute Sarah Belcher’s eyes glow 
with the knowledge of male shame. 

Wolf tells his story with daunting 
directness and neither he nor his 
director, Leona Heimfeld. seems to 
possess a necessary sense of the 
absurd. I am not asking for jokes, but 
when a repentant Loew looks in a holy 
book for the appropriate spell — “First 
catch your Golem” — the dialogue has 
wandered in from a cookbook. First 
catch your drama, Mr Wolf. 


Bad skin day: Katy Cannichae^ and Paul Viragh in the German play, Leatherface 

Too much 


- \rr arf- 


jaw-jaw 



Jeremy Kingston 


ONCE upon a/ rime Tehran was a 
happening plade, and between 1951 
and 1953 a budding democracy keen to 
get rid of the Shah and loosen the 
financial thumbscrews snapped on it 
by the Anglo-Iranian Oil Company, 
better known as BP. Try as we might, it 
is hard to dissociate Iran now from the 
subsequent military coup, the routine 
tortures, the Ayatollah, the storming of 
the Iranian Embassy and the Salman 
Rushdie fiatwa. 

Mehrdad Seyf's new play for the 
fledgeling company 30 Bird puts all 
such dodgy baggage to one side as he 
recreates those heath' expectations of 
the early 1950s. His point is that there 
are Iranian heroes and they were 
people like his parents and relatives: 
staid secular types who did the laundry 
while chatting about quantum politics. 
If 1 oouid shed calories explaining the 
convoluted shenanigans of Mos¬ 
sadegh’s Popular Front I would be 
Weight Watchers’ slimmer of the 
century. 

The simple thrust is that four friends 
who rejoice in the long-term health of 
the new Iranian democracy fail to see 


the brutal short terra as their newly 
won freedom is pulled from under 
their feet The problem with Seyfs play 
is that it strains so hard to be theatrical 
and fails so badly at the same time. His 
austere, formal characters never get 
much beyond being one half of a 
political or marital schism. They are 
moulds waiting to be filled with 
something more substantial than the 
cardboard dialogue concocted around 
them. Jelly would be an improvement 
The lad: of emotional chemistry is 
aggravated for flat, cinematic settings. 
Half tile action between Andrew 
Pollan’s political activist Mammad. 
his wife Minou, his political associate 
Parviz and their friend Mitra. takes 
place in four receding cubicles behind 


J1 


,vr 





a large screen placed diagonally across 
The only real logic of this off- 


the stage. 

putting exercise is to move the soporific 
political discussions around unlikely 
parts of the stage. 

So.stilted was the rest of the show, 
particularly the sexless scenes between 
Puilart’s Mammad - and Claire 
Summerfield’s arid intellectual wife 
Minou. that I would happily endorse 
Seyfs claim to be the first Iranian 
Pinter. The one devastating moment, a 
sour pun on the title, provides tardy 
recompense for two and a quarter 
hours of heavy driveL 

Despite the wonderful folk music 
(provided by Hamid Karim-Nessai 
and Behzad Bol ou rforou $ han). Iranian 
theatre remains an indigestible delica¬ 
cy for me. 



"**■*>!*# 


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February 199» 


Eastwood 




[ydePark Corner, Lomkm W1 Freeman 

T bnsiness development pH**™ 

Ilh eo die few* tireworkAop goen for dep*- 
m 200 delegate* wbo-feaye rated *1 wry highly 

t M&orees and network* 

+ JW firm"* repalalkMi 


♦ C«t*8 


of^^'-SCSSEC- 

Andy Smith 

... caiSwtahhi- 

• \-Mcftaci4tanM»'- 

Robert Bn** 

Andy Frifedi 

PaoJRhodes 

Nk* Thompson 


Horwath Cfcnk WhiteM! 

. OtnfonHaS 

Eunpe DeWHeTw^lohriaW 

xtor Camelot 

finm .. . 
luce & Co 

deni The Tunes . 

Rees Pollock 
' Rhodes Benson : 


CMmum rwnnHs 

AJmoriolhe Baaid > 

Bows* Develop***-Europe 

Corporal* Serna* Director 
Partner ' 

Accoenimcy Correspondent 

■ EES 

jr&Hnu* Director &. Cwnpasy Secreiory Bonhams 


AfanHodgart 
Fritz Mofsd** 
Main Eastwood 

jehn Freeman 


Tbe Wtoritstop ***** 

Director cto*| Hector & Dams, Miami, USA 



■-. fcfaniEatwood .■ Manky A Steward. 

. , .jota lteeman ■ VAT > to attend eftbff ^ 

TWES V^ ^SSLio Ifc attend both the fee b reduced te'£666pfes VAT. 

reference or*Wdrfchop. u> an«« W ^ 7Cf > D fours farsoiicitors. 


-—--- - ■ _lAoX-AtiiHr for Accomdfflsts & SoEeitorfir 


Corspetftwe 


Position 


^Organisatuut ^ . ... ... ~ ■ ’ ' -. ' Po8l Code --- Td —------ 

ddrws --—^ 7 T cmmn cdMWKKnom <***** my . 

endowacheq*®**—~ . 7~~- ? J ... :_.__ _-L---da** 1 

4 Wai^bop- □ f66(kVAT (CTSL5S) 

- 


th<* amount of lime our 

Property Oopr-rin.-r.-nt spends on corporate support 



the increase in the size of our 
Property Department over the last 18 months 



the commitment you’ll receive from u* 
as one of the UK leaders in property work 


Statistics car- be used to prove anything. But ir, 
Ber.vin Leighton's case they represent r ea, 
evidence of our superb record of success anc 
expansion m the property market. So much so 
mat me wore the only firm to be tap-rated by —c 
Un.-W *00 in 5 937 to the major categories of 

•Y.-taii occupiers, inve-stnent/institutiona! ana 
;;;’ f /p* Op <s '! V C CC,p ‘i!'IO':». 

A;, ,$■; urtibifieuy 3-5 ytifu ciuisilficri property !5V.yer. 
ymu vv.il icin a team dedicoted to maintaining and 
..tendrng our mputotmn for exemkmee Our 
cverifiing ethos ir. a pr^cticpi approach commmr.o 
n-uarm,d onnerstundtog m the property 
with -.-e r : -?i'iest tear,nice! fiand^rds. 
ihis approach means we continue to win new 
businm-o from, high prof to and exciting clients. 


It you share cur dedicated approach to property 
work, you'li enjoy strong support from across 
the firm, in our progressive environment, the 
expectations are high and the potential 
re-wards are outstanding - the fact that five 
assistants in our property department were 
promoted to partnership in 1S96/7 speaks 
' 0' »tf:0!f. 

To find out more about the opportunities 
we offer, call our retained-consultants, 
Jonathan Brenner or Yvonne Smyth at ZMB 
on 0171 523 3333 (evening/weekends 

0131 94C 68431. Confidential fax 0171 523 3839. 

Alternatively write to them at 37 Sun Street, 
London EC2M 2PY. Email: jonathanigzmb.co.uk 


**««*« 


BERWIN LEIGHTON 




if the law 
is an ass... 

here’s your 
chance to 


in-house legal recruitment consultants 


£ExceHent + Benefits 


The QD Group. Of course jou knew us. jrouiray h*#e 
usmI us, but have jou thought About joining us? 

bosom 

you on afa bt non nspaa&Oq and aumnonyiftan jou 
could *ver Hope fiar as a young lawyer 
As a nait of suffained grow*.^we are recking W» 
coreutams to join our «etfkig t^wJdibaweaiWywrs- 
pqe prefa^V Wwuse or^in priwans practe or with 

previous experience in jnodier recnaonera: consuiaiKy. 

bnxrested "m diffcnem: business sectors with w«U 
denfoped soda] jMHs and i strong commercial 

yon will be attracted by the chaBenge of mi 


exddng tfivlsion within a young, highly profitable and J 
dynamic HR related jyoup whh products ranging from 

recruitment through management consultancy and 
counselling to advertising. 

An exceSme remuneration padoge.n« just a sahry.and 
odwr benefits but with the potential for equity ownership, /. 
acedia-with k»g«nn career advanrement, rred* this a c 
fare opportunity far someone who is seeking somedang 
diffisrent both outside the law and inside recruitment 

Please write with jour Curriculum Vhae 

to June Mesrle or Stephen Rodney at QD ^\T\ 

tn-housc LcgaL 37-41 Betford Row, 

LondonWCIR4jR Fax:0(71 831 6394 •»~ a ‘!ZSk 












































































































£ 339-2 *8.2 3- S'S-fi'S S 5‘^o> _ li’E >S c .^■§P3§9‘3 . S & W § fiS S. 5 


to 

af 




■THR'-TTMRS TUESDAY FEBRUARY 101998 


■*. :• j-'t 



TO ADVERTISE CALL 
01716806828 


T .F.GAL APPOINTMENTS 


0171 


FAX: 





- c f ibl 



Immediate Partnership - No Following Required 


CORPORATE / BANKING 
JUNIOR PARTNER / SENIOR ASSISTANT 

To US$275,000 


8-12 years 1 pqe 


London 


One of the fastest expanding and most progressive US law firms opened an office in London almost a year ago 
and progress has been nothing short of spectacular. Historically one of the undisputed leaders in global energy, 
the firm has established a prominent reputation in international capital markets and M&A 


The firm now wants to appoint at partner level a UK qualified Corporate, Banking or Projects Lawyer. You will 
not be expected to bring business, although contacts will be appreciated - a global client base is already 
instructing the London office on some of the most complex and innovative international finance deals. 


To tackle this workload, you probably have at least 8 years' pqe in a leading UK practice; crucially you have the 
confidence and experience to take a lead role in advising on the UK and International aspects of multi-territory 
transactions. 



(The office of Gas Supply) * ... 

LEGAL ADVISOR 

£40,000 - £45,000 (plus benefits) 


Victoria, London 

OFGAS, fee gas industry regulator, needs an additional lawyer to wwk with fcLegal 
Director in providing high quality advice to its Directra* General endstan on all aspects. of, 
their work. OFGAS has been at the forefront of the successful introduction of compemMm 
into the shipping, transportation and supply of gas. The emphasis of tynr wtgnowis drifting 
to bringing competition into ancillary services and to the exacisevf to Director s powets 
np/fof competition law. The «vi«gt ment of the CoinpctitioD Bill wD accelerate this process. 


The Post ' 

is needed as^SSTof these chan ges. Your aim 
mil be to enable the Director to make fee most effective use of her powers. You will find; 
pragmatic solutions to commercial and economic problems. 

The post will be a permanent appointment and, as lawyers working at OFGAS are part of fee 
wider network of legal teams within fee Government Legal.Service there.may ,be future 
opportunities to work in other departments. 

The Person 


\ir > 


n 


reps 


the si 


You will be a qualified lawyer, barrister or solicitor. You will have a mini mu m , of about five 
years experience in general commercial or regulatory law, gained in government, private 
practice or industry. A familiarity wife domestic competition law and law governing utilities 
would be an advantage. 


You.will be able to weak well wife'staff at ail levels and have an aniharative but diplomatic 
approach to regulated businesses. You must have .first late drafting skills mid be able to deal 
with a flexible and varied workload. 


Please send a full curriculum vitae with a letter outlining your suitability for fee position by 
27 February 1998 to: Mary L Brunton, Head of Personnel, OFGAS, 3rd Floor, 16 Palace 
Street, London SW1E 5JD. 




'M- 


‘ r 
“ ' * • - 


OFGAS is an equal opportunity 
as individuals regardless of age, 
orientation. 


loyex. AH applicants will be considered on their 
* *” , gender, race, religion, marital status or sexuall 


\r. t . a' *-, 

-al.v 


This is a supportive, unified and young partnership, committed to growth in London in response to business 
generated both in Europe and the world's major emerging markets. The firm delivers a very positive message and 
QD consultants have travelled to the US to gain a first hand insight into the firm's culture and ethos. 


BYG0TT BIGGS 


Legal Recruitment 



If you wouM be interested in hearing more about what this firm can offer you please contact William Cock. Gareth Quarry or 
Nick "Shilton (aH qualified lawyers) on 0171-405 6062 (0171-727 7009 eveningsAveeJcends) or write to them at Quarry Doujafl 
Recruitment, 37-41 Bedford Raw, London WCIR 4JH. Confidential fax 0171-831 6394. 


Don’t expect a low profile life as fee number two to 
our sole In-house Counsel and Company 
Secretary. This new role will demand your high 
level commercial input on a broad range of legal 
issues including complex outsourcing deals, 
transactional M&A work and joint venture work. It’s 
a role in which you will not only build productive " 
working relationships wife the rest of our 
management team and our Board, but with our 
customers - household names operating 
predominantly in the finance, retail, leisure and 
service sectors. 


LAWYER - HEMEL HEMPSTEAD 


That's why we'll expect you to bring us 
accomplished communication and interpersonal 
skills as well as technical prowess. Equipped with 
2-4 years' post-qualification experience, you should 
have trained with a City or top regional law firm and 
focused on corporate law since qualifying. 

We operate in the fastest growing sector of the IT 
industry so. like us, you'll need to be flexible, 
adaptable and willing to embrace change. 

In return for your ability to think laterally, commercially 
and for yourself, we offer the kind of rewards you'd 
expect from an organisation acclaimed as one of 
Britain's Top 100 Employers. Your competitive salary, 
for instance, will be backed by an imaginative flexible 
benefits package' and the chance to build a significant 
capital stake in fee company. 

If you're looking for greater exposure, broader 
scope and better prospects, please cad our 
consultants Rebecca Errington or Stephen Leavy in 
confidence on 0171 405 6062 (0181 293 8520 
evenings/ weekends). Or write to them at 
OD In-House Legal, 37-41 Bedford Row, London 
WCIR 4JH. Confidential fax: 0171 831 6394. 




Contact either Jo B; 


Write to them at 7 
Or fax 


on 0115 9480084 
248 663). 

NG15DU. 



■ ? h -I 'v-? 


We build trust. We build 
partnerships. For our customers, 
all blue-chip companies, we build 
competitive advantage. The result? 
An IT Services company that’s a 
market leader in applications 
management and a major player in 
business process implementation and 
change management. With pre-tax 
profits feat have risen by 40% for 
the third year in a row. Clearly, 
when you put people first, 
performance follows. 


F'l'GROlT FLf, 


http://www.figroup.co.uk 




VS 


< 


-te, to- 


GOOD FOR BUSINESS 


Bar Vocational Course 
lecturers 




juick. 
«p that 


We axe seeking to recruit full-time 
lecturers for our Bar Vocational Course. The 
successful candidates will have relevant 
professional qualifications, recent experience 
in practice, and will be able to teach Opinion 
Writing & Drafting; Case Preparation and 
Conference & Negotiation. ' 

Teaching experience is not a prerequisite 
(training will be given) rather we are looking 
for a genuine, enthusiastic commitment to a 
career in tea dung, good communication and 
teamwork skills. 


■pr»c 

■V: 




VII 


Applications must be received by 
, 27th February 1998 ' 


.■MEf*-' 


Ptease Send your CV 
with a handwritten covering letter 
b an envelope dearly marked "Confidentiai^ to 


TNirh 




Jonathan Bacon 
BPP Law School 

Rochdale House, 128 Theobalds Road 
London WCIX SRL 
TeL 0171430 2304 fax 01714041389 


<m> 


QD IN-HOUSE LEGAL 


IP To £55,000 + Benefits 

Household name company with a large csobfehed tepl tram. Seda a 2-5 
year qualified imetleaual property lawyer, to underal® a mix of IP work bui 
with a non- co n tenpous bias. Trademark. Copyright and IT contracts 
experience are all of interest. This orgjmisaban can afar excellent cafibre 
wmrit based in South East Rfi£ TC22745 


TREASURY/CAPITAL MARKETS To £75,000 

This thriving finance institution seeks a masu/generd banking hwyer with 
seme experience in rapitai markets to underrate a pivotal role wfthn its 
edstiqg department You wi h»fi between 2-5 years' pqe from finance 
maxupon or private prance. You wsB need a strong pcrsevaSty to do wefl in 
this fcswnovirg environment Excdknt long term prospects. TC2B465 


M&A/COM MERC JAL To £40,000 + Bens 

Major player in the aviation sector, with an established legal tram based in 
Central London, seeks w recruit a 2-4 year qualified corporate lawyer, 
preferably from a top Gty bw firm. The work is de ma ndi ng bread ranging, 
and heavily Iraa- na tio nal h orientation. You wff tave a commercial, dynamic 
personalty to thrive n this cutting edge orgirwarion. Ret TC44224 


TRIPLE A US COMPANY Retail Finance To&xceRent 

Major US multbnaonai with an unsurpassed repuenion for exc e llence, sedo 
qpprnfct na&i finance lawyer from private practice or in-house to join its 
existing team. One of the worlds strongest financial institutions, this is an 
excellent opportunity to jam an ambitious and extremely commercial 
environment Re£7C42272 


COMMERCIAL LAWYER To £45,000 + Bern 

QutstandVig opportunity to join a comply working w the hi-tech end of the 
me di a sector. You will be 3-4 years qualified, with top academics and 
excellent experierx* gamed other ri private practice or in-house, This role s 
pnmaniy co m m erc ia l contracts, but any speoafct ttitecommuniations 
experience wifi be an advantage. Based in South East Ret TC46746 


COMMERCIAL PROP LAWYER To £50,000 + Bens 

Unique opportunity to lorn this major corporate as sole m-house 
property lawyer, responsible for leasing, licensing and conveyancing. 
You will be 5+ years qualified, with exeeHenr academics and 
the experience to work autonomously. Based in South fast. 
Ret TC44746 


fiy further efimaut « amplae confidence please amtatt Stephen Leery, fane Metric a-Rebecca Brrintun {it ow^Io^wsIbii 0171-405 6062 (0171-7983736 

dm aiQD Maine Legal, 37-41 Bedfbrffa". bral* WCIR4JH Omfidmri fax: 0171631 6394 


QD 


IN-HOUSE LEGAL 

LONDON * SUMWGHAH •. U1M . MKHESIEt - BONG IQKC • PUB • NEW TOnt • SYDRET ■ HH80USNE • AHSHHMH * TOWWTO - ?ATOE3 


Golf in Madeira.... uind 24 hours CPD 


Unique 6 day Law Society accredited residential course at a 5 star hold 
Lectures on conveyancing, trusts, wills, probate, planning, professional DaitnershiiK nr 
Course fee of £1,200 ex vat includes flights, insurance, bed and hr^nw P i^^, 

Depart 9th November 1998 with ABTA aSS ATOL tour operator - SJSbS 

After the success of our Skiing and Lecturing course in die Alps last mo^th ^ ' 
_ we are takin 8 provisional bookings for our next course in January 1999 - 


UmOATOH 
SOUTH- Aaodai. Uni Sol 

Ho^lt Sr o*P Q*» ter High 

Coot UEtgaUen asp. tawhow] 


Cell IbdUukl Me 

ttalT) Ton 01747 " 
01747 838047. 


. 7a> 


ASSISTANT GROUP LEGAL ADVISER 


coMsmucnoR unra- m- 

Umm. band IUMSm, 
Wltfiod far rtx twxuli muaV 





RAPIDLY EXPANDING 
PtRM OP SOOCITORS 
IN CENTRAL 
CWLDR3RD REQOKE 
A SOLICITOR/ 
EXPERIENCED LEGAL 
EXECUTIVE TO ASSIST 
WITH GROWING 
WORKLOAD IN 
RESIDENTIAL/ 
COMMERCIAL 
PROPERTY 
Plem appfy to 
Box No 9748 


Department. The role wUl email involvement in a wiriri* , p ' q,e “*° ^• 
together wife some specialised^^ ^ 

candidate will have good aU round coinmefeial cx^ZT ce ' 

employment-law and experience of ctyntracrual drafting^e^^ 0 ^^ f 
The ideal candidate will be bright, capable of wnrW«„ 
achieving cacting profcsstonai sondanfa withi „ , 





m 






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.'V 


^ TEME^ TUESDAY FEBRUARY 101998 


39 


■At * 



LAW 


MEDIA MEDDLING 41 
LAW REPORT 44 


Frances Gibb talks to the QC written off as a stopgap Attorney-General 


.... "UL-M. 

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PETER MICHOLiS 





!» ,■ 


GS 


I redators with an eye to the job. 
pf Attorney-General in the run¬ 
up to the election bad.John 
Morris, QC/pensiohed off. He 
.proved'them wrong. His 18.years in 
.opposition shadowing the Attorney- 
General’s job finally piud off. “It never 
crossed my mind that I would not be 
doing it" he says.' “I was fold by Tbny 
Blair two years before that ! woold be. 
sain the last six-months I did hot take 
on any long fraud cases. f. was 
preparing for office; touring the coun¬ 
try." 

Now he twinkles with enthusiasm at 
his new career at the age of 66. “I am," 
he says, “enjoying it enormously. " He 
has confounded predictions that he 
. would be a : stbpgap, filling the post ■ 
until retirement, came and. a more 
rigorous candidate tookover. Within, 
weeks .'he had set up a full-scale scru¬ 
tiny of the Crown Prosecution Service, 
whichcould lead to its biggest overhaul 
since its creation in 1986. 

More recently, he was thrust info the 
headlines after taking emergency legal 
action to prevent the identification of 
the Home Secretary's son, who had 
been arrested on cannabis. charges. 
The press coverage.- he - Insists, was 
unfair ahd took no account of his role 


vindication, he argues, of his stance. 
\ ..The .episode is typical of how the 
Attorney, the "Government's chief law 
officer, can be thrust into the limelight, 

. sometimes in what seem to be futile 
efforts to make foie law chase a moving 
target. The Straw case has aroused his 
concern over whether the laws — 
■whethCT to protect the identity of 
juveniles or of rape victims — are now 
redundant or at least ineffective. 

There is a particular threat he says, 
now posed by the'Net The increasing 
use of global technology is "a matter of 
public concern”. What he asks, would 
happen if the wife of a senior politician 
was an alleged rape victim and her 
name was published outside the legal 
jurisdiction; an the Net? 

With the Home Offices, he has set up 
an inquiry into the laws, first into ■ 
anomalies between parts of the United - 
Kingdom on the anonymity provisions 
for sexual offence victims (they do not 
‘ apply in* Northern Ireland, for in¬ 
stance); and secondly, on reporting re¬ 
strictions, which operate differently in 
different places. 

As thing”; stand, tire' law can be 
undermined “by a sidewind,” he says. 
“If you regard the protection of rape 
victims -as important you must leave 



Morris, QC “It never crossed my mind that I would not be doing this job" 


at the "crossroads bf Whitehall; West- - no stone unturned to see if there’s a 


minster and the legal profession". In 
that role, he sees himself as "guardian 
of die public interest". There was just 
one brief phone call from'Jack. Straw: 
Mr Morris recalls: “I deliberately 


way of dealing with this. Otherwise, 
what is the point of having the 
legislation? I am never happy with 
spitting in the wind." 

In his wider role, the Attorney seems 


ill 




- -it- ' li* sAt 

<-a 

■s-Hi***” ,: ' 

«**«“ 


distanced myself. Any charge of cover-,. to want to shake off his reputation for 
up is undermined by thefetf that I took - conservatism, for beating Ihe drum for 
a differentriew.from him.".. ' . ./..his professiqn, the Bar, in the face of 

The AJtbn«y^CeheraL found himself . Lord ‘ Mahkay - of QasWera’s legal 
under fire fim for seddrig the injunc- reforms." He no longer fights its comer 
tion — on legal advice — but more so r on rights of audience in the Crown 
for applying to sustain it after toe boy's' Court although-he is cautious. "We 


name was known in Scotland and from 
the Internet Mr Justire-Mosesr sup¬ 
ported, him in granting the ban, but 
days later Mr Justice Toulson lifted-it 
because of toe changed circumstanced 
Mr Morris .insists ihat.his aim 
throughout was to “protect toe irnegri- 


shouid look at limited rights and see 
how they are working." be says: A 
recent Adam .Smith Institute report 
calling- for the silks.. system to be 
-.scrapped, however, provoked a frosty 
response-in Ms ide as official head of 
the Bar. “I amvery much in favour of 


ty of the criminal justice system?. It . - keeping this system.' he says, while 
was his duty to return to court and pointing out that -he was-not talking- ■ 

the judge' that, “on balance", the . about the “fat car fees of silks attacked 
injunction should continue. The judge by his colleague the Lord Chancellor, 

made no order against him far.cbsts — . But he fevoore a moderate line on 


the press and contempts of court 
“There is a continuing public interest 
in having the courts open, "he explains. 
“I am toe last to constrain the courts 
from fully reporting where possible, 
within the legislation of Parliament... 
1 am not running dial particular hare." 

It was. in feet local newspaper 
reports of trials that drew him to the 
law in the first place. His father was a 
magistrate, bat both father and five 
brothers were farmers —“I didn’t want 
to farm, I was the blade sheep,” he has 
said. He went tp University College of 
Wales, Aberystwyth, then to Gonrille 
and Cams College, Cambridge. 

A fter being commissioned into 
The Royal Welch Fusiliers 
and serving on Germany, he 
stood for Parliament and was 
dected hi 1959 for Aberavon. where he 
is still the Member. His early Bar ex¬ 
perience was in Swansea (personal 
injury work for th$ mineworkers and 
Iron Trades Umofi^ Next he moved to 
London and Frederick" Lawton's cham¬ 


bers, where he did more criminal 
work. Michael Havers, whom he was 
to shadow, was also there. 

In the Commons, he was rising. He 
has the distinction of being the only 
member of the Government to have 
held previous Cabinet office. From 
1966 to 1968, he was a joint parliamen¬ 
tary secretary at Transport, taking the 
Breathalyser Bill through for Barbara 
Castle. After the 1970 Conservative vic¬ 
tory, he returned to the Bar, prosecuting 
in Essex. He became a QC in 1973, and 
in 1974 it was bade to Parliament as 
Welsh Secretary, before toe 18 wilder¬ 
ness years of apposition. When not 
skiing, shooting or fishing—but not, he 
insists, hunting — he spends his spare 
time with Ms six grandchildren and at 
his home in Wales. 

His first real test will come when Sir 
lain GUdewdl’s report on toe CPS is 
published. The Attorney-General’s re¬ 
sponse will be crudal. But for now, he 
is busy showing that an old-style 
Labour minister can reinvent himself 
as a new Labour one. 


A lament for 
parodies lost 


I B 1978 Mr Justice Foster decided that 
“only a moron in a hurry would be 
misled" by toe similarity in name 
between the long-established far-left news¬ 
paper, the Morning Star, and the new Daily 
Star, published by Express Newspapers. He 
therefore dismissed toe claim by the former 
of “passing-off by the latter. Last month the 
MP Alan Clark received a more sympathetic 
response from Mr Justice Lighttnan to his 
passing-off claim against the London Eve¬ 
ning Standard in relation to a spoof diary. 
Mr Dark’s solictor wrote on these pages last 
week applauding the judgment 
In 1993, Mr Clark published his Diaries for 
1983-91, during part of which period he had 
been a minister in the Conservative Govern¬ 
ment The book was a great success, 
describing fin Mr Justice Ughfraan’s words), 
"a larger than life character unconstrained by 
normal standards and conventions of behav¬ 
iour and a total lack of discretion". Mr Clark 
had retired from politics in 
1992. but was elected an MP 
again on May 1 last year. To 
parody Mr Clark’s diaries, and 
to make humorous political 
points about the life and times 
of the Conservative Party, the 
London Evening Standard 
published from March 1997 
Alan Clark’s Secret Election 
Diary and, after the May 1 
election, Alan Clark's Secret 
Political Diaries. 

Mr Dark was not amused. 

He sued for passing-off (and 
for false attribution of author¬ 
ship). claiming that a substan¬ 
tial number of readers had 
been misled into believing that 
he had written the articles, and 
claiming that he (as an author 
with an established reputation) 
was suffering damage. He called a numberof 
witnesses (including other Conservative 
MPs, lawyers, and porters at his London 
home) to testify that they had been misled. 
Mr Justice Lightman agreed dial a reason¬ 
able reader would be misled and that this 
was damaging to Mr Clark. He granted an 
injunction against the newspaper to prevent 
it from suggesting that the articles were 
written by Mr Clark. 

There are two issues, one particular, and 
one general Hie particular issue is whether 
these articles would mislead a reasonable 
reader. True, they were published under Mr 
Clark's name, with his photograph. But toe 
tide referred to a “secret" diary, it stated that 
Peter Bradshaw was the author, and much of 
the text contained (as Mr Justice Lightman 
accepted), “obvious fantasy, incredible and 
wfld exaggeration" even compared with toe 
unconventional nature of Mr Clark's original 
work. The law does not and should not 
grant remedies because inattentive readers 
miss toe point 



COUNSEL 


David 
Pannick qc 


The general issue is how toe law of 
passing-off (and false attribution of author* 
ship) should apply to a parody. Mr Justice 
Lightman considered, “if only to brush 
aside", the submission on behalf of the Even¬ 
ing Standard that Mr Clark was seeking to 
prevent toe defendant from exercising its 
right to freedom of expression by publishing 
a parody of his work. According to the judge, 
“this argument is totally misconceived", 
because there was no restriction on toe right 
to publish a parody, only on toe “presentation 
or packaging of the parody". 

But this raises the central difficulty of the 
case. The art of parody depends on presenta¬ 
tion, as well as content. As the US Court of 
Appeals pointed out in 1993 (in a case in 
which Nike was suing an artist for producing 
T-shirts with toe same logo but with toe word 
“Mike"), parody is a subtle literary form. It 
“must convey two simultaneous — and 
contradictory — messages": that it is the 
original, but also that it is not. 

The purpose and effect of a 
skilful parody is to make 
people almost believe they are 
reading toe real thing. To 
require toe parodist to an¬ 
nounce, in effect, “This is a 
joke." frustrates and devalues 
.this literary form. When the 
context of the parody is polit¬ 
ical expression, the law should 
be especially slow to impose 
restraints that undermine the 
efficacy of toe article and so 
impede freedom of speech. 

The general point about 
parody and toe particular 
point about toe Evening Stan¬ 
dard articles merge. Those 
readers who thought that the 

_ articles were by Mr Clark had 

simply failed to see the joke. 
That is an inevitable risk of an effective 
parody. The problem for the court is whether 
the humourless or inattentive reader should 
be regarded as reasonable or unreasonable in 
the law of passing-off. 

Mr Dark should have lost his case. 
Freedom of expression is of crudal impor¬ 
tance in relation to a political parody and 
toe law should not grant remedies because 
some (or many) readers fail to get the point 
If the law is to recognise the value of parody 
as a subtle literary form, then it cannot 
judge the author by the deficiencies of some 
members of the audience. In this context, 
the law should credit the reasonable reader 
with intelligence, perception and a sense of 
humour. 

The regrettable consequence of Mr Justice 
Lightman's decision will be to undermine the 
art of parody by requiring authors to signal 
the joke to avoid being taken too seriously. 

That is no laughing matter. 

• Tfie author is. a jjrncrisitig barrister and a Fellow 
of All Souls College. Oxford. 



# 


* 



stop that 
stapler 

AS IF the Lord Chancellor did 
mtfhave.^i^h troubles, his 
department has-fallen victim 
to burgfcs; • Almost- £2,000 
worth of office equiprnenr has 
been stolen from the LCD 
since last May. 

Geoff Hocn, Parliamentary 
Secretary at the dlqpartmenL 
told MPs-last week that the 
most oqoensive item missing 
was a laptop computer worth' 
£1300- But also snitohed was 
an electronic stapler worth 
£373 and : a heavy-duty stapler 
worth E55. -:~i. 

Role witch 

IN A classic case of poacher 
turning - gameforeper. one of 

toe Commission ‘for Racial 

Equaliorsleading lawyers has 
left to join Dibb LuptorrAlsop. 
As head of litigation at the 



commission, Makbool Javaid 
spearheaded several major 
cases against employers. At 
Dibb’s, it is the bosses he will 
be working for.. 

The firm says: “Mr Javaid *s 
experience, acting on behalf of 
employees, wifi leave him 
uniquely placed to guide 
employers through a difficult 
area." •• • 

All-conquering 

THE BAR’S own charity, the' 
Barristers’ Benevolent Assocf 
ation,has launced an appeal 
this year to celebrate 125 years. 
The first event is a production 
of She Stoops To Conquer by 
the Bar Theatrical Society. . 

Among the cast? Judge Hen¬ 
ry BlackseU and Mr Justice 
Eady. who were performing 
in toe Middle Temple revel 
last week. Details of the event, 
which will be held at Lincoln's 
Inn Old Hall, from February: 


17- to 21: 0171-400 8409. 
mBettina Gould, a legal seo- 
retary at Stephenson Har¬ 
wood, has won the London 
Legal Secretary of the Year 
award. The newly wed Bettina 
was nominated by her boss, 
Catherine Brearley. who 
described her as having the 
“charm of an angel". 

Meeting of minds 

A NEW group for young tele¬ 
communications Laywers is 
holding its launch meeting 
this week. Don Grukkshank 
of Oftel is the key speaker. 

David Naylor, a founding 
member wbo is celebrating his 
move from the City firm 
Ashurst Morris Crisp to Wed 
Gotshal & Manges, an Ameri¬ 
can firm, says: “It's a group for 
communications and policy 
lawyers who have not yet 
reached dinosaur status." 

The launch is this Thurs- 


— ^ cP® 

u hoots * 


• “ n. 





Coker complaint about Lord Irvine 


Mission impossible 
for Gary Hart? 

GARY HART, senior planning partner at 
Herbert Smith, will be wondering whether 
he is taldng on mission impossible in his post 
as special pohey adviser to the Lord Chancel¬ 
lor. LasTweek he found himself at the centre 
of an industrial claim by Jane Coker, a 
leading immigration solicitor, who claims 
that Lord Irvine of Lairg breached sex dis¬ 
crimination law by not advertising Hart's 
post urine instead the old boy network. Only 
hours before. Hart most have breathed a 
sigh of relief that Robin Cook seemed to have 
replaced Lord Irvine as the press’s favourite 
whipping boy. Then in one breath. Irvine re¬ 
surrected both himself and Cook — with his 
hopes that a new privacy few would stop 
publicity, about Cook’s affair. And all tins 
even before Hart starts in Man*. 


day. Details from Mr Naylor 
via e-mail on: 

davuLnaytortbweiLcom 

The X files 

WILDE SAFTE has released 
details of a strange fire at the 
firm’s Paris office. It happened 
a little over a year ago when 
staff at the firm had just 
completed a huge transaction 
— the export financing of an 
A340 aircraft — after working 
all night Thomas McDonald, 
a Paris partner, explains: 
“Shortly after the exhausted 
but satisfied team of lawyers 
had left with the final versions 
of the multiplicity of docu¬ 
ments on diskette, toe office 
broke out in flames at precise¬ 
ly the spot where toe transac¬ 
tion was centred.'” 

The cause of the Haze, in 
which miraculously no files 
were lost, remains a mystery. 

Legal scrap 

THE prospect of another dog¬ 
fight at the Law Society looms. 
Last week plans to stage a 
mini election within the coun¬ 
cil in April so that it can nomi¬ 
nate its own “official" 
candidates for the deputy vice¬ 
presidency were approved by 
the society’s policy committee. 

The plan now goes to the so¬ 
ciety council in March — an 
earlier draft proposal that 
only nominated candidates be 
allowed to stand for election 
was ditched. 

But even toe watered-down 
form has met with surprise: 
some see it as a sign that big- 
hitters an the council plan to 
challenge Kamlesh Bahl, who 
chairs the Equal Opportuni¬ 
ties Commission, in her pitch 
for the deputy vice-presidency 
this summer. 

Among names mentioned: 
Michael Napier. Irwin Mitch¬ 
ell senior partner, and David 
McIntosh, Davies Arnold 
Cooper senior partner. 

SCRIVENOR 


p 


QueeNS C ovHS£U 


STEUART& FRANCIS 



LEGAL APPOINTMENTS 


CHAMBERS 

M 


BANK! NG . *,r I N A .VCE. 4 . 


23 LONG LANE LONDON EC! A 9HL. TEL: 017 I-606 8844 (FAX: 0171-600 1793) 


BANKING & FINANCE 


Front Office - M&A 
To £100.000+bonu$ 


This well known and innovative securities 
bouse has a burgeoning secu rit isa ti on business 
which operates in a variety of markets and 
products sectors. 

The Principal Finance team seeks an addi¬ 
tional lawyer to join its select monhaship in 
a front office capacity. The ideal candidate 
should have 5-7 years' experience of M&A 
work gained at a leading commercial practice 
or another financial institution. This unique 
opportunity is nndtidisdptinary in nature and 
will encompass the origination, structuring 
and execution of deals. Rewards, bath profes¬ 
sional and financial will be outstanding. 


Global Markets Lawyer 

to £6Q.00Q+bonus _ 

Our diem is a highly regarded and well Hked 
investment bank which has expanded via 
strategic acquisition and organic growth. 

Tbe central kgal department is responsible for 
advising both tbe treasury and capital markets 
businesses. It now seeks 10 recruit two lawyers, 
2-4 years pqe, with experience of investment 
banking manners. Although the work lead is 


In-house counsel 

EExcellent 


debt trading, emerging markets and equity 
derivatives it is essential that applicants have a 
grounding in ISDA documentation. Of prime 
importance is ] 

forms a great part of this role. 


Providing a fully integrated advisory, trading 
and investment service to a broad dient base, 
this international investment house is head¬ 
quartered in London. 

Due to business expansion and development 
of cutting edge products the legal department 
seeks an additional member. It enjoys a high 
profile within the institution, giving trans¬ 
actional support for the capital markets and 
derivatives business. There will also be the 
opportunity to be involved in other commer¬ 
cial issues. Bright lawyers with general banking 
knowledge (2-5 years'pqe) wbo would fife? to 
develop a new focus would be ideal candidates. 


Chambers Banking & Finance recruit lawyers into banks and other financial institutions. For further information or for career 
advice, please ring Deborah Kirkman or Stuart Morton on 0171 606 8844. Confidentiality is assured. 


COMMERCIAL COUNSEL 


Manchester 


Attractive Package 


Jointly owned by Paramount and Universal Studios, UCI is a holding and properly owning company 
involved in the development of multiplex cinema complexes on a global basis. Year on year the 
company has demonstrated an impressive increase in profits, and with its strategy of enhancing 
market leadership in both established and new territories, this progression shows no sign of slowing 
down - and nor does the workload! 

Tbe group now seeks an additional commercial lawyer with around 2 yre PQE and the vitality" and 
enthusiasm to contribute to this continued expansion. Experience of a broad range of commercial 
contracts and agreements is essential, including computer contracts, IP and licensing agreements, 
along with other general commercial matters. A relaxed confident manner and the ability to represent 
the company in outside negotiations may be the final deciding factor in this appointment. 

Ail applications will be forwarded to UCl's consultant 
Jan Collins, Peter Manners Partnership, 

Midlands Office, 4 Asfordby Road, 

Melton Mowbray, Leicestershire LEI 3 OHR. 

Tel: 01664 500140 Fax: 01664 500139 



CINEMAS 





















THE 


timfs TUESDAY FEBRUARY 101998 


TO ADVERTISE CALL 
01716806828 


LEGAL APPOINTMENTS 


0171 782 7899 


mr- 





FINANCE LAWYERS 


Structured Finance 
Banking 


Asset Finance 


Project finance 
Insolvency 


Our busy Finance Department needs first rate lawyers to join our London and other 
international offices. 


"We are looking for lawyers with; 

• the highest level of technical expertise; 

• an appetite for demanding, often highly complex, work; 

• motivation, enthusiasm and confidence; 

• a lively and approachable personality, and 

• a real understanding of clients and their b usine s s es. 



You want a career with a firm that: 

• is one of the world's leading international practices; 

• maintains the highest standards of professionalism; 

• develops your skills, without forcing you to overspecialise; 

• promotes a team-based and supportive culture; 

• demonstrates care and concern for your career, and 

• provides significant opportunities to work outside the UK. 

We welcome applications fiom candidates with up to five years’ post qualification 
experience in the UK or abroad who are ambitious to join in our future. 

Please write, in confidence, enclosing your CV to Jonathon HflL Personnel Manager at 
Freshfields, 65 Fleet Street, London EC4Y 1HS. 


An info rmation pack is available. 


BANGKOK BARCELONA BEIJING BRUSSELS FRANKFURT HANOI HO CHI MINH OTY 
HONGKONG LONDON MADRID MILAN MOSCOW NEW YORK PARK ROME 

SINGAPORE TOKYO 


london appointments 




city EnegotJable 

Opportunity In Uw c.vcullve imralgruUon »orld 
to ho pari of an expand live department, \ouwlll 
alrt-Jd> he immersed In buslnnw Iramleralhw 
mauero and Iwve a fowl wasp of Uie law and the 
simciurrs ulihln which Uw rules operate I you 
protublv have al least 2-3 years or practical 
r\pertrnci'l ir von oiler the clarity or thought, 
nrgmi.illim skills and .ibllllv to read quickly 
ulien required >i«u will And that responsibility Is 
available early and Lhal merit Is quickly 
reropnised and ivwanlcd. 

CnnlaclSue lieson HUM. 


City c£50,000 

Within one or the fastest expanding arena of thb 
prominent HUgnUon pracUcr. the medical 

negligence team plays an Increasing part. Acting 

for the insurers of general health clients, 
hospitals and specialism there la a wide range of 
high quality work. much of It complex and 
challenging, undertaken by Uda Mcndty and 
Informal group. Admitted around 3 years, yon 
will haw iour own caseload and also be Involved 
with others on raa|or pieces of litigation. 
Excellent package. 

Cun lari Stephen Waiklns 12344 


holborn partnership 

Successful, corporaie/eommerclal group of 3 
partners and 3 assistants in mil service 20 
partner Lincoln's Inn commercial firm welcomes 
experienced corporate lawyers. Currently 
diverse range of mainstream corporate work 
performed Including m & a for pics, particular 
expertise in merfla/emertalnmenl work and fast 
growing reputation In offshore. Inumatlonal and 
banking mailers Including leasing and nviaUon 
nuance. Some following required. Farther 
requirement for an assistant with 1-3 years' pqe. 
Contact .Andrew Howe Browne 14893 




central london to £45.000 

Train' - ** rainmaker named for medium Sired firm 
nltli an lnieiT*iilns exHUng «llem b3se. Team 
playr Ideally al the 2-3 pqe level. Is fo take on 
in/i.i .mil ir.m-vu'Umul work In addition t« a fowl 
..I .'..miwr.-iJl mati'Tv Including IP. rr. acency 
and distriliutli-n agreemenb. You will be 
ew-uar.iged t» plav .1 full part In Lhe life of the 
departmenl and will enjoy extensive client 
1 nnian giving ynu the u|ipnrtimiiy to serure your 
fulure .i- a lue-lne.- develnper. 

Ciiiilael sue he-*in NUT 


wc2 c£65.000 

Stand alone department of 9 Tee earners In 
highly respected medium sized litigation led nrm 
wfehfs in reerull enuvpreneurial -wHcllor up to 
It) years pq with (wd comae is and Ideally wme 
following. Ycllng f*ir properly rompanlrs. 
Investment hinds and general trading companies 
the leant covers InvrstmenL site acqutdllons. 
joint ventures, development and landlord and 
tenant law. Scope to develop one's own niche. 
MipporUvr rnvtnmmenL rteOned prospect#. 

Contact Stephen Watkins 14363. 

hare rfr/unt owen. 


gf| EdO.OOO 

Medium sized City nrm with International 
reputation and global network of olHces 
currently Instructed by substantial developer 
rtlenta on large scale, blgi profile. imiJli-fwrty 
prolrcb, nften invwhlng urban regeneration 
and/or PR urgeitliy needs 2 assistants for Uiese 
high value deals. You have 1-4 years' pqe and 
experience probably In planning or property. 
Prnierlsi experience not essential Great 
opportunity 10 gain experience of nnance side. 
Cuntact Andrew Howe Browne 1757. 
kingsutn House. 103 kfngswqr. londou. *t2b 641 . 
lei. 0171130 2349 tax- 0171 831 2536 


Ha vs RicnarcT 






LrmHON 


CHAMBERS 


HBG Construction is one of the UK’s 
lop five building organisations and part 
of HBG nv, die leading European 
construction group. 


JUNIOR TENANCY 


Chambers have a vacancy for a Tenant 
practicing in Commercial Law and or 
in Company, Employment Law, 

Professional Negligence or 
Intellectual Property. 

Practitioners of 7 to 15 years please apply in 
confidence by 24th February enclosing a CV, 
details of instructing solicitors and areas of 
speciality to David Douglas, Chief 
Executive. 

The Chambers of Michael Burton QC 
3 King’s Bench Walk North, Temple, 
London, EC4Y 7HR 


legal executive 
construction industry 


To succeed in this important role, 
you should be qualified to at least ILEX 
Part 1 with 4-5 years’ legal experience 
- Including general litigation. A 
knowledge of the construction industry 
and related litigation is also desirable. 


In return, we offer an attractive salary in 
the range of £2G-£23.GOO and the usual 
benefits associated with a company of 
our standing. 


To apply, please send your cv to 
Richard Bull, Personnel Manager, HBG 
Construction Limited. Merit House, 
Edgware Road, Colindale. London 
NW9 5AF. Fax 01B1-200 0629. 


jasr construction 


Property Lawyers 


As a leading international law firm, Norton Rose.has a reputation for the forest 
quality of service to financial institutions and corporate clients around the world^ or 
specialist Property Practice, which has strong links with our worldwi e * 

urgently needs exceptional lawyers to meet the increasingly complex requiremen 
our clients. We are seeking lawyers with at least two years experience to. strengthen 

our teams in the following areas: 

© Property Development © Property Investments 

© Property Finance Q Corporate Support 

We need people with character, resourcefulness and the ability to handle complex 
t ransa ctions and serve the needs of dema n d in g clients. 

If this sounds like you, we can offer you the chance to derelop your specialist skills 
across a range of challenging and stimulating work. We offer a supportive team 
environment designed to get the best out of all our people. The rewards and career 
po te ntial will be exceptional for the right candidates. 

for further information and details of our opportunities For carter development please 
xvrite with your CV to Celia Staples. 


^m 



The 




Norton Rose 

Kempson House, Cunomile Street, LondoaEC3A7 AN Tel: +44 0171 283 6000 ftx: +44 0171 283 6500 
For further information on Norton Rose visit onr web site at http://www.nortonrose.ami 

LONDON HONGKONG BRUSSELS PARIS SINGAPORE BAHRAIN PIRAEUS MOSCOW 


; Sc 

■ •: gw* 

•• ..v *F- 




'C. - 




ns-#®! 

jLr.'j 'rV^Tfri; 


In-House • London 


Regions 


trading housed 
^iXS^^SrakaeuL 

EDINBURGH . c.l-2yre COMME RCIAL LIT. ^^ v-. ^^^ opecwydti wbet&exyoHareapartner.an. 

Bright, commercial lawyer w join small Broad conumeraal ra^oad^h^ te^ot or a trainee qualifying this year. • 

SSy/SUSSKoS^Pra.xxty : 

craxracn^icoa^tioaismes^ peraoaahty^ 

Ma^opeiator and a top contractor seek Popular Holborn to which TCo gnsa ^^Modram^radp^e^soiicilms. 

OXFORD _ Coramarcrtl 

exp’ce mnild be ideal but is not essentinl. key rate m trt depsmoeot’s goowdL. 

COMMERCIAL PROPERTY 3^yfs INSURANCE UT. . _ ■ 7r4 ^ IS caseload. inrinAW a ronp. reTwvmnwrrial- 

London- High calibre com prop spoadtetro agreeroenttforlrigi' profile clients. , ' 

EES WEftS® '' O^ORD . ; _ mcramrnndtd 

^g^ScMLosnorad^Sg ENVIRONMEWAL. ^ 

house se^s bright, ambitious employment Opportunity fbr jnmor lawyer to specialise KEAWNt* ... corporate 

litigatorwitii3-4years r pqe for challenging in non comemioos environmental law at A mnto of Ica dbigfinn g m timTharoes 
haernalional rale. Fnmch speaker preferred, medhim-sized finu. Prior relewrt exp ce VaUCT baro WMlkuaLt, the jamor 

rtotkth ro S vrs + dKiiabte but urn essennaL 2:1 degree and (NQ-2 yi) mid at the associate (3-5 yr) 

. T .. . ... mT maifiv firm hncfcfrrmind is required, levels TOT bngbt ambitious SOticitOlS. 

M4 Corridor - Ambitious IP LawyerWjom ^ Salaries approving City rams. . . 

expanding co as sole in-house legal adviser, CO/COM N<J-4rrs _T*. . . . , _. , 

handling a broad international workload- High profile Loudon firm which has MANCHESTER/L£EDS Matrl miHH al 
Great opporomity for business involvement. aitractednicreasii^iBimbereofdisillasioQed Sapeib opening fra' high calibre fondly 
irrcc ton Chy lawyers seeks bright lawyer to handle lawyer (^Sym pqe) witii a track record in 

f 1 j Kt.ra, broad corporaie/commeiciai caseload on privately fonded work tojom leading team 

behalf of Dsafii/enrenaininent diesttl. ^.^OrararaZL i 

^e^rojoin their established legal ^ms. PARLIAMENTARY 1-3yrs 

High quality work and generous packages. Leader in this field seeks enthusiasts k» 7 «r esc^je from dieiCity to the Nonh- . 


I 




WERT!SEMU@Sf 
18806828 


COMMERCIAL PROPERTY 3^yrs INSURANCE UT. 
London-High cahbre com prop specudist to Leading firm wdh strong mj 
l'om team at leading co. Padtron is initially tion seeks brigte lawyer for 
offered as a I yr contract but for the right caseload to be based i 
ca ndidate , the prospects are good. To£4&k. Lloyd's office although pn 

EMPLOYMENT UT c3-4yrs 

London- Dynamic international finance ENViKWMEPrrAL 

house se^s bright, ambitions employment Cpportnnity for junior hwy 


RinTFTHro 5vrs+ desarame bid not esseniai. 

M4 Corridor -Ambitions IP Lawyer to join major firm background is 
expanding co as sole in-house legal adviser, CO/COM 


FTSE . .. . - ^ hirad oorporaie/commercfol ^caseload on private^ funded work to joi 

betulfS^amcnaiaraaradirara. ^rauiran.aurirau 

lawyers to jo in their established legal teams. PARLIAMENTARY . 1 i 3yrs fmm tlua rhy m Hw 

High quality work and generous packages. 1 ^"A-foWraJraiwiiimtsair.hdiiiPr escape rmtn me uny ro me 


rnimTirm 2-5vrs 10 underakE a broad range of work for 

8SS2KSs--i.i--ir.vi. s-tsiisssrsrsaas 


Berkshire-unique roie ror an u speoausi 

of IT solutioiui on an inrernational basis. giwp of lmgation procedures. 


For fall of these or other positions please contact Sophie Brooks (Private Practice- 

London). Strum Ban (In-Home) orUz Neser (Private Practice- Regions) on 01714301711 
or write to Graham GUI & Young, 4t> Kingsway, London WC2B6EN. Fax 01718314186. 


GRAHAM CULL A YOUNG 


0171 430 1711 






[■’'H *i* (Hi | 

BIIMBBSRStov 

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7 8j{j THfeflMES tlffiSPAY FEBRUARY 101998 


LAW 41 






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Angela Devlin, left; Jane, Simon and Sheila BowJer, and Tim Devlin: with media help, their campaign succeeded in winning freedom for Mrs Bowler 

The media were right 


ws 


udirial. initation at the media’s 
intervention in miscarriages of jus¬ 
tice emerged several times during 
the past lew weeks at the retrial of . 
Sheila Bowler. She was cleared at the Old 
Bailey last Thursday of the murder of her 
89-year-old aunt Mrs Bowler, 68; alleged 
to have pushed Florence Jackson into an 
East Sussex river in I992,was convicted 
the-next year, and given, a life sentence. 
Until her release last July for the retrial, 
she had served four years of the sentence. 

At roe point the judge, Mr Justice 
Wright stared fixedly at Steve Phelps, die 
producer of Channel 4’s Trial and Error 
programme (shown last night} and his 
colleagues an the press-benches, to wam. 
diem about the bus in programmes that 
had been screened about die case. “Let 
this be r a warning. to thcge who make 1 
television programmes,The,sakU when he 
leanit thattwa hostile witnesses had come.. 
forward as a result of one of three pro- - 
grammes bn the cast "'‘'V" 

Perhaps this was just good fun at the 
mediais expense. But ffithad not been for '• 
television^ proposing and investigating , 
the iteory feat Mrs Jackson might have 
walked toherdeath, supported an air by 
Professor Archie Young, an expert, on 
geriatric behaviour, the case .of Mrs 
Bowie-'would never-have’reached the ' 
Central Criminal Court. 

The case was a difficult one. In theory, 
an accused person is innocent unless 
proved guilty. But .Mrs Bowler* defend- - 


A judge’s criticism of press investigation 
was wrong, say Angela and Tim Devlin 


ers had to show how Aunt Fla seemingly 
immobile and-frail, came to be in die 
water. Her body was found in the river, 
500yards from where she was left ina car 
at night on a.busyroad, while her niece 
was seeking help for a flat tyre. Mr Justice 
Garland said at the first trial (when the 
jury were absent): “The jury can ask. 
themselves: if not the defendant then 
who?” No other plausible explanation was 
offered, and the jury convicted. 

hen we started the campaign 
to free Mrs Bowler—whom, 
because our daughters were 
at die same primary school 
in Rye, we have known for 15 years we 
had the daunting taskpf having to find an 
explanation for- Mrs Jackson’s death. 
Even if die Criminal Cases Review 
Commission had then existed, it would 
not have had the funds to launch an 
inquiry. Solicitors we approached were 

gom g to charge us £ 20 G an hour for an ini¬ 
tial consultation alone. Television was the 
obvious recourse. : ‘ 

J: - The producer and a researcher from 
Trial and Error visited Mrs Bowler "in 
prison and were so convinced of her inno- 
cence that they made a programme before 
the appeal. Three journalists visited her in 



Holloway. Mrs Bowler's account con¬ 
vinced them of her innocence, and they 
wrote moving articles about her plight 

But now, , under a new ruling, journal¬ 
ists and television, researchers are no 
longer allowed access to serving prison¬ 
ers, unless the media people make a 
written undertaking not to use for 
professional purposes any material 
gained from the visit. 

The Court of Appeal last December 
overturned a ruling by Mr Justice Latham 
(in January 1997) that the right of free 
speech includes a right of oral access to 
the media, and that convicted prisoners, 
despite thdr imprisonment, retain this 
rivfl right When Jack Straw appealed 
against the judge's decision, the appeal 
court judges found in the Home Secre¬ 
tary's favour. They concluded: “A convict¬ 
ed prisoner has no right to communicate 
orally with the media through a journal¬ 
ist the loss of that right being part and 
parcel of a sentence of Imprisonment." 

The law lords insisted that though 
prisoners have lost the right to communi¬ 
cate orally with the media through 
journalists, they could still communicate 
by letter. But prisoners' letters are 
routinely opened and some are read by 
prison officers. Many fear reprisals: by 


definition, prisons are places of secrecy 
and paranoia, and staff commonly dis¬ 
courage correspondence with the media. 
Nor can investigative programmes such 
as Trial and Error hope to establish the 
validity of prisoners’ stories or their 
alleged alibis without face-ro-face contact. 

In an ideal world, miscarriages of 
justice would be quickly righted. Mrs 
Bowler was granted leave to appeal fairly 
quickly, although she had spent nvo years 
in jail by the time the appeal was heard. 
The first appeal failed, and their lordships 
objected to criticism of the trial QC in the 
Court of Appeal, which was reported in 
the media. 

I n response to feature articles in nat¬ 
ional newspapers, and a second 
Trial and Error programme, hun¬ 
dreds of members of the public 
wrote to their MPs and to Michael 
Howard, then Home Secretary. Most had 
cared for old people and could testify to 
the extraordinary feats of relatives who 
had been considered immobile. Last 
February Mr Howard referred the case 
back to the Court of Appeal and in July 
last year the Lord Chief Justice ordered 
a retrial. 

Trial by television may irritate their 
lordships, but for Sheila Bowler, and 
many others, it may be their last hope. 

• The authors led the campaign for Mrs Bow¬ 
ler and have written a book. Anybody’s Night¬ 
mare. about it. Advance orders: 01580893640. 


Learned friends fall 
out over education 


A crisis is brewing in the way in 
which Britain educates its lawyers. 

It erupted in public last week when 
the Senate at Bristol University voted to 
dose its legal practice course (LPC). 
Insiders believe that Bristol’s is the first of 
several likely closures, especially in 
regions over-supplied with courses. 

The problems at Bristol pose deep 
questions about the nature or legal 
education and the capability of che legal 
profession, led by its teachers, to under¬ 
take worthwhile applied research. 

This is illustrated in comments made hy 
Professor Peter Birks, QC. and a Fellow of 
All Souls, to Professor David Evans, the 
Pro-Vice-Chancellor of Bristol, about the 
general standard or professional legal 
education. He said, for example, that the 
professional stage of the education of the 
country's lawyers had been done “appall¬ 
ingly badly" and that "the old monopolist 
providers have taught it mechanically 
and uncritically". 

Professor Birks claimed that “genera¬ 
tions of lawyers have been forced to 
abandon the critical and independent 
habits of mind learnt at university and 
have reverted to learning by hearL 
Changes over the last decade have 
brought some improvement, bur nothing 
much is to be expected of institutions 
which repudiate responsibility for re¬ 
search." 

In Bristol, conflict between those pro¬ 
viding the professional training and those 
engaged in more academic research wax 
brought to a head by questions of how- 
limited funds were to be spent. But 
Professor Birks's main point is that 
professional legal education nationwide is 
a form of “dumbing-down" of bright 
graduates, who a re forced into courses led 
by rank-and-file law teachers with no 
research capability. 

The consequence, says Professor Birks. 
is that “little work is done on the realities 
of professional life and practice and not 
much on the theoretical aspects of 
preparing professionals for legal prac¬ 
tice". 

If true, this is a serious charge against 
the profession. But some top legal 
educators claim that the Professor Birks is 
out of date and that recent reforms mean 
the LPC is now “a jewel in the crown" uf 
the legal education system. 

Yet there are debates about where legal 
education should he going, given the pro¬ 
fession* ever-widening diversity-. Ideally, 
the professional bodies should play the - 
crucial role in sorting out this problem. 
But many commentators reckon that the 
Law Society, for one. is too tied up over 
various roles as a regulator and trade 
union to give a positive lead. As a result it 
musT fall to the colleges themselves to 
provide the answers. Professor Nigel 
Savage, the chief executive of the College 
of Law. thinks that the time is ripe to 


/tr whkh 

^r 



Approaches to teaching 
law are being 
questioned, Edward 
Fennell charts the 
growing disquiet 

develop real partnerships between the 
colleges and law firms so That research 
can be undertaken into the professional 
conduct of the law and the management of 
legal services. Already. Professor Savage 
is leading a variety of initiatives to bring 
professional education more into line with 
the real demands of modern-day 
lawyering. 

One of his concerns is die need to 
develop a more professional approach to 
advocacy, training and dispute resolut¬ 
ions. Announcing yesterday the setting up 
of an institute of Litigation. Advocacy and 
Case Mnnageement — which brings to¬ 
gether the Australian Advocacy Institute 
and the Centre for Dispute Resolution — 
he admitted there was “a complete 
absence of structure that enables young li¬ 
tigators to develop ail-round skills ". 

His new institute plans to gu a long way 
towards remedying that weakness, ft will 
benefit from Australia, which has already 
undergone “case management" reform 
and. in particular, the input of the Hon 
Justice George Hampel, rhe chairman of 
the Australian Advocacy lnsrituie. Its 
great strength will be that it should serve 
lawyers throughout their careers, taking 
account of rhe latest developments to be at 
the leading edge of practice. 

As for raising the .siandanj of rhe LPC. 
the College of Law is now keen to exploit 
technology to widen access and put the 
bread and butter aspects on CD-Rom. It 
could then concentrate its human re¬ 
sources on more demanding, smaller 
seminar-style, face-to-face learning. That 
could certainly be one way forward to 
answer Professor Birks's complaints. 


*r* 


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01716806828 


LEGAL APPOINTMENT S 


FAX: 

0171 782 7899 




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lonrimx K'.2M IRO 
Tel: --H i'i -I 1“ !'K!(i 

I .IX. - 1 4 1“ I I I" 1H i" 


GARFIELD 

ROBBINS 

LONDON • SYDNEY 


] 2M. Thv ChLfk-y Tower 
2 Chiflcv Square 
Sydney \.s\v 2()un 
Tel: -012 218 } 

I-ax: -M2 *>.VS 2 !XS 


L O N n ON 


AUSTRALIA 


L O N D O N 


TAXATION ’ 

5 Years+QuaUfltrd SParmwr 

TWs b> a rare opportunity io ro straight in lo a big name We>« End 
player as partner. The departmental world cud is such ihui you 
will cake charm? of an existing diem-base and develop a practice 
of your own focusing on a mixture of corporate and personal ux 
matters ranging from off-shore i rusts io rhe remuneration of 
employees. Experience, comrmen.'iahty- and legal excellence are 
ibe main requirements for die successful candidate since enough 
work already exists io cuiqpeiuale for. a lack of follow In#. After 
that, building up your reputation as a major player is dow n 10 
vou! RcfT03*10.H 
CORPORATT/COMMEROAL 

NQ to 3 Years Quanted ’ SAustmUa 

This top 5 Australian firiri seeks highly motivated City lawyers to 
join in. Corporate Commercial Department Representing some of 
Australia's biggest Wue rhip.corporations, you will he exposed to 
an exciting variety of work- Good experience of M&Ax. 
privatisations or general commercial work from a recognised font 
is required. Firm will sponsor visa applications. Ref:Tl 12-tO.C 


COMMERCIAL PROFEBTY/CORPORATE FINANCE 
2 to 5 Yean Quatffled SAusImUa 

If you have a background in both commercial property and 
corporate finance together with an entrepreneurial Hair then read 
on: our client is a Itigh piuftle corporate practice ansiekiietl with 
one of the Big Sis international ucumnunn firms. It seeks 
ambitious lawyers in join ns progressive ovpnKiie property team 
Involved in large lounsjn and leisure projects front advising clients 
on corporate structure to JCting on the properly side of the 
transactions. The firm encourages client contact and new ideas. It 
will sponsor visa applications. Ref:"nr.W^3.C 
INFORMATION OFFICER - PROPERTY 
5 Years* Quattfted JUSxceUml 

Leading City firm is seeking m appoint an experienced 
commercial property lawyer ii> provide Jos iw-hinv and research 
support to us leading crenmereiil property team. The commercial 
■property department is developing from urvitglh to strength and 
covers the whole specirunt of ionunem.il property law. 
Applicants must have excellent tecltnical ami Li»mmunieaiion 
skills. Ref.LE205t.L 


ENTERTAINMENT 

4 Yean* Qualified to 190.000 

As pun of the conunuing groviih of tins fore anl thinking «"ii\ 
fintt. its recently expanding media unit cs seeking a Liu tx-r u tilt at 
least f«»ur year* experience in film and T\ xurt. Alt Ip •ugh j 
following is Jesiruble as a sign ••! alvliiy it is not essential i- 
there ts no shnnage oi work in the tlepanmeni However, a high 
level ot commercial acumen and a sound idea of Ihisiikss 
dev elnpmeni an.- important. I mn't miss this rare opportunity! 

Ref:Tti!n>U.I. 

ENERGY 

Parmer toXPartnmbip 

Hera,«ned as herng nm- >•] the pre-emmerW enenjv pri.ike- in 
the City this tending firm is seeking recruit an .ulditi- mu I 
partner to jcun its highly successful cneijjt team, file linn has ;i 

substantial presence in both the iviiion.il anJ ... eiK-qn 

sectors. Applicants must have excellent credentials and jii 
inruA-jtive crmimerciat apprr.aclt. A following i- desirable as an 
indication of reputation tbut n>»t essential». ■'mistanding 
ojtpurttinil). Kefttgrtil.L 


Ql'AUFYING IN 1998 
Xeirfy Qualified 

Ve are luppv l>* dl-cilss .ipp..mmiti«- that will exist |,.r |s.s-.pic 
vfualifung in I'**', prep.in- ;«*u I or I hi" liVrnien p/> s r->. 
in prepbinitg vnur C* to put •.•.■u m the |»Mtiin take ad' antauc' 
• ■( •ippiirr unities when iliev arise in tile nexi !cw mm milt-. 
I'reparjip>n is ilie kc-> in easunng \ou ire tt'lc m achieve ’.••nr 
career ambition- Pel:Nk I 'W K 

TELECOMMLIN1CATIONS 

,-f to 6 Venn Qualified lu£68.000 

loin this i,,p tier t.nv turn »nh a hiuhlv regarded 
trie*. «,nnninn.-.gn «)s prj, lire and w.ii will l»e assured ••>! access '• • 
an impressive gluixit blue chip *.lieni base The chance to lx.- at 
tlic-1..lefi'Tii ol inic-nuiiinvil letecommunicaiions work should ran 
Iv mi-scxl Our client is seeking a higtilv competent and icvlinic.il 
l.twtc-r wiiti regular.-rv experience wlm has a iln>r«>nch 
uudersi.inding «'f and . ••Iiipelence in. Eun’pean regnLilion- in 
tin- held A second 1 uo.j-k.-jii language W- add iv preler.it'le hill 

Is not e—cwul kci.'lil.si I.i I’ 


Visit oar utef>-si$i 
more positk>ri$^ 

imruKgarfteldrifM 

* 


-' . 




Please contact Dominique W Peir’elly. Bryn Ron den or Andrea Melnick (ail qualified lawyers) on 0171 4/7 1400 or write 
to them at (he London office for more information in complete confidence. Call .Evenings Weekends 01 SI 960 6144 
Confidential Pax 0171 417 14^-i. Email: doniiniqueup'4garfieUbx>bbins.co.uk 





iirdt* 3 


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i .Si; ' fr '" ' 


RjESDENTlAlTCOMMERClAL PROPERTY ^ If Yc*f?QE. 

Thii 18 partner firm is noted lor tbr quality of >B drear base tnchKfiBg: 
nropwtv utvestmou and «fc*dopmem co’is off-shore mveaors and 
landed "estates. Handle a-mix of portfolio ^ marayenvf pt. landkwd and 
,-i.n r and enfrandusanenr rremers in this hanJwurtang and Sieadly 
Ref: S794.Cootad: Pore Gosdw. 

COMMEROAt PROPERTY x 2 . ^ 

One af die West EndY friendlier and ntosr respected final needs two 
ne* arisranm. The property depararem 4 E™ 5 

who handle inrer ilia.ihe marugeimrnt, aoqmarKn and 
ffisrosal of snbsonrial ponfcdios-iad. for the firmY Media dienr base. 
r^S^IO- Contacts Peter Goadea. 

UK AND TAX LAWYERS - IN-HOUSE ^ ^ 

^ a rax bwrer with the brainpower of » - rodret reyn ust wfao 

w excdlciu dienr skills and well descipped cumreerera] MB? 

rf ^ -v* hw nvinv major Inwsmwm Banks who sec* re hire UA rax 

Lond on N.W Ywh. 

mles are n> k>iP Strucrered Fm«t« depmtmeni* 
m.i . ,H he aoivdy mrolre b devising, marketing and ctcihhjbuig 
^.^rive Jfttnmm h* iotmuraooal coeporanoos. Apprep«re 
icnurame W* vrirtfi s-mp chts background 

nam Omiws: M Rnnaado- 

COBK *^ *,***21* B 

Jlcfc 989. CmtratE Pandora Gmhne. . . _ 

W Yrare’PQE 

PRIVATE CLfENt i-idinE Qry firms in advising prratt clients 

Alrhough th* « °nc ^ toBa3lioI i 4 H y j i, has an 

<***■ *«**?■. *f* 5S23 - 

CeoucrEandura Gtnhrie. 


TELECOMS-IN-HOUSE-LONDON 1-4 Years’PQE 

Central London bawd, otrdkaH is a young and dynamic Telec cm enmpany 
entering an exciting developmental stage- Dealing principally with the UK 
the potdkin indudra supplier and customer ag reements, ntterconnecL. IP with 
scene emptoymenr and adverting mode. Ret 53*3- Conracc Ririard Gnm. 

OIL-IN-HOUSE London 

Excellent opportunity do work for a market-lading ail company. 
A background in cwnmexeial work would be useful Previous oil 
experience an advantage. The s u cce s sful candidate will have a strung 
education and hare worked foe a major dty/law Him. 2 to S years’ PQE. 
Refc 5181. Contact: Richard Gawn. 

ENVIRONMENT LAWYER 0-3 Years’ PQE 

Outstanding opportunity for junior sobrirar ra acquire rop-notch non- 
contenciaas environmental experience io superb City practice. Handle 
i nt ews an g issne* and e xp e ri e nc e a high level of dientgootaLT in expanding 
team- NQTs writ an in te rest in rhis area are welcome io apply. Ref: 5862. 
ConacbJaaeCIanfiag. 

INTERNATIONAL PROJECTS 

(INDIAN WORK) 1-6 Years’ PQE 

UnrivaQed In ita progress within the Indian market, this top City firm 
boosts one of toe leading major projects and corporate praerkw m 
Lootfoa. Inferably-dual qualified Unit oot essential), a suhdror is sought to 
handle major infriratntcnuv proiects of ewremriy high profile. Fantastic 
package. Refc 5785. Contact: Jam Qasdwg. 

EMPLOYMENT 3-5 Years' PQE 

Thu 3$ partner Central Loailun'finn has a dedicated employment practice. 
Hariqg just reciuired a. fnnfaer partneg the grnup seeks to appoint another 
. assistant as the tcamcaurinnei ro expand. Emphaus on Don-cmtrenciouc 
.wuric, ideally with rax and NJ experience. Refi 5861. ContaccCko Binns. 

COMMERCI/du LTnUATlON 2Yca«’l>Q£ 

SpetiaKa hri parinn leam in Ihk ihkBihi m ohI City firm handles high profile 
rf-related disputes. Now they hare an opening for an accompfehcd Imgator 
with strong advoaey skiOs, capable of asoirning early itspomaWny. Soamfi 
unrrinietl Iraekgrritntd ade a nra gnwis. HrP 572Ct CoPtacc Pro Binta. 


Hughes-Castell 


Inremational Legal Recruitment Consultants 


i Am Office 87 Chancery Lane, London WC2A 1ED. TeL- 0171 242 0303 Fax: 0171 242 7111 
Hnnc Kum Office: 602 East lawn Building, 41 Lockhart Rosvj, Hong Kong. TeL- 25201168 Fax: 2865 0925 
Chicaco • Adajta • San Frandsco • Palo Abo •Sydney • Melbourne • Brisbane 


Company Secretary/Director of Legal Affairs 


Milton Keynes 


circa £75,000 + bonus + executive benefits 


Our client is a long established UK PLC in the 
engineering sector, with over 2000 employees, 
supplying specialist machinery to a range of 
industries worldwide. 

The role is to acr as Group Company Secretary, 
on retirement of the present Company 
Secretary later this year, and ro provide the 
Board, the corporate centre and the individual 
businesses with a commercially orientated legal 
service. This will involve compliance, corporate 
governance and other responsibilities of the 
secretary of a UK listed company. It includes 
che review and monitoring of rhe legal aspects 
of all group contract procedures, together 
with the provision of legal advice and assistance 
on a wide range of issues, instructing and 
working with outside lawyers as necessary in 
the UK and abroad 

The person appointed will also have 


administrative responsibility for the group 
parents department staffed by patent 
attorneys. He or she will have a key part ro play 
in risk management affecting all areas of 
the business. 

W"e are seeking a qualified Solicitor or Barrister, 
with substantial experience in an international 
commercial environment, and knowledge of 
company secretarial practice with a PLC. As a 
member of the senior executive team., you 
should have the ability to contribute to the 
future strategy of the business. The successful 
candidate will be highly commercial with strong 
negotiating and influencing skills, ideally 
gained in international contracting. 

The appointment carries a competitive 
re .itineration package, including an attractive 
base salary, bonus scheme, share options and 
the usual executive benefits. 


In the first instance, please send your CV to Peter Phillips, 
Chief Executive, Rada Recruitment Communications Ltd, 
195 Euston Road, London NWl 2BN. 


Rada 

RECRUITMENT 

COMMUNICATIONS 


**•,**•*■ 












THE times TUESDAY FEBRUARY1QJ998 


TO ADVERTISE CALL 
0171680 6828 


LEGAL APPOINTMENTS 


FAX- 

0171 782 7899 


r 


INSOLVENCY 


PRIVATE PRACTICE 


£ PREMIER CAP MKTS (RE-TRAIN} TOCZO^OO^B 



Top ten firm seeks high grade senior insolvency lawyers, to 
add a 'heavy-hitting* element to its insolvency practice. You 
wffl require commercial acumen and the ability to establish 
your credit*fity in this high quality and achieving department 
where success gains high reward. (Ref. 206 78} 


Leading edge capital markets department in leading City One of the top firms SI |he North wishes to bring in a 


fern seeks 0-6 year capital markets or corporate/finance 
lawyers with drive end ambition who are keen to retrain. 


partner with norecontsntious experience who can 
str en gth en its emptqymeX team at a senior level Equ&y w 9 


Excellent training w31 be provided, as well w opportunities be on offer to the right person and financial rewards wSl be 


tor travel and secondments kl this prestigious environment 
(Refi 20516) 


emeient A rare opportunity to become a part of this blus 
chip practice. (ReL 21903) 


BANKING 


Boost your banking careerl Rapidly expanding first-rate 
national tom wishes to recruit several lawyers at various 
levels with mainstream syncficaled loan and asset finance 
experience lor its London office. Make a real contribution to 
this firm and receive commensurate reward. (Ref. 20515} 


ECOMPETITIVeB PROJECT FINANCE STOP RATE^HsNR CONSTRUCTION LEEDS 


One of the foremost cortTracctal City law fume is looking tor 
a lawyer with 4-6 years' pqe to work in the project finance 


hfighty respected teatfeig national construction practice offers 
an extatinQ opportunity for a oocror assistant soScitor or erietirig 


section of its corporate department Deafing with a wide partner to join the team. With co nt en tio us or norvco nte n ti oua 


range of cfients, your work wffl be diverse, of an axcsfant 
quality and ex tr emely rewarding. (Rdf. 20646) 


experience, you wil hands a broad range of work and ploy a 
key rob h the deveiopmart of the practice. (Refi 21566) 


ENERGY 


TO £55, OOa^H CONSTRUCTION TO £52,000^H)N HOUSE LOCUM NORTH EAST 


The expanding energy department of one of the City's 
prsrreer corporate law firms wishes to recruit a junior energy 
lawyer with 2-5 years' pqe. Operating within an area which 
the practice has earmarked (or future development, your 
input wffl be valued and your Future ensured. (Ref. 21545) 


Wrift-estabGshed property department of a major City firm n 
see long to recruit a nan-contentious construction lawyer 
with 0-4 years' pqe to provide advica on the tofl range of 
issues, with increasing involvement in the evolving fields of 
PH and projects work. A superb career moral (Ret 
21188} 


Major industrial company seeks an assistant eoScitor, idealy 
with a minimum of 2 years’ commercial experience. You wifl 
have the confidence to work autonomously on a range of 
matters as well as managing external lawyers. The post wffl 
be for a nwrimun of 3 months and carries an attractive 
salary. (Ret 21886) 


CORPORATE FINANCETO £50,000 ■ PROPERTY 


TO £42,000 M ■ SNR BANKING MANCHESTER i 


Corporate finance deportment at rapidly expanding City firm, 
seeks a senior corporate assistant with 3-5 years' pqe to work 
in the M4A field and related areas. Experienced an Yellow 
Book work or venture capital, you wffl need to be bright, 
oommerc&fy aware and a real leam-pbyw. (Ref. 214521 


Loading muflmational law firm is looking tor a lawyer wrth 1 • 
3 years' experience in commerc i al property work to taka on 
considerable responsibility and a pro-active role in the 
friendly property department of its London office. This is 
unrivalled work in a premier practice. (Ref. 21884} 


Unusual opportunity whhin relatively amal Manchester office 
of estabfishod and reputable London tom for bankkig lawyer 
with minimum 3 years’ pqe sooting to head up his/her own 
practice. An ideal opportunity to mates your mark tor 
someone seeking partnership within 2 years. (Ref. 21842} 


CORPORATE NO 


£N Q M ■ TELECOMS 


TO £48,000 


Qualifying next month? Corporate experience during 
training? We have a superb opportunity for a newly quafified 
lawyer to join the corporate department of one of the City's 
premier firms. Exceflent salary, unrivalled quality of training 
and open-ended career possibilities. (Ref. 21519) 


A superb position for a lawyer with 8-4 years' experience of 
telecoms work, to join the FT and telecommunications group 
in (ha Cky base af one at (he country's top practices, a 
recognised leader in tots field. Remuneration is high and 
career opportunities virtually unfcnfted (Ref- 21283) 



Mr^'af^Jab lax fe&qtt Sjtth 


For further information in complete confidence please contact Yvonne Smyth or Andy Caulfield on 0171 523 3836 (01923 469564 
evenings/weekends} or Lindsay San diford on 0171 523 3672. Alternatively please write to ZMB, Recruitment Consultants, 37 Sun Street, London 
EC2M 2 PY. Confidential fax 0171 523 3839. E-mail yvo nne4jtzmb.co.uk ZMB, a Zarek Group Company 



WWIURtLe«Llk 


J U D t C 1 A L 


studies board 


Equal Treatment 

Advisory Committee 

Applications are invited for membership of the Equal 
Treatment Advisory Committee of the Judicial Studies 

[ TvR J Board QSB). TheJSB is based in Central loratoa 

The JSB is a non-depattmenial public body, sponsored 
by che Lord OttrtCdtort Department, whidi aims to assess the training 
needs of, and to deliver training ft* all part-time and full-time judges, so 
set standards for the training of by magtsnates and to advise srfcunais 
on how to ad judfcialiy. 

The Equal Treatment Advisory Commtoe, EEAC, is a committee 
established by the JSB whose principal term of reference is to advise the 
JSB on training to ensure that "ail who appear before couns or tribunals 
are treated on a basis of equality 1 *. This is intended to include aH groups 
who might be disadvantaged before the courts; groups which obviously 
fell within that definition include those with disabilities, litigarts-in- 
person, children and, in certain drcumaances. women. Then? are 
currently 14 ETAC members and the JSB seeks to appoint 4 new 
members. Appointment is made for an initial 3 years, and may be 
■ renewed for a further two. 

ft»r further details pleaseconraa Zara Grey at the JSB. 9th floor, Milfoank 
Tower, Miflbank, London SW1P 4QU (telephone; 0171 217 4708). The 
closing dare and time for the receipt of completed applications is 
TBednesday, 25 February J99S ax 4pm. 

The Lord Chancellors Department is commuted to equality of opportunity in 
employment for all upo are eligible, cm ibe basis of ability, 
qualifications, and fitness Jbr aw*. Applications are 
invited from ail qualified individuals ^ 
irrespective cf race, gender, marital status, 
disability or sexual orientation. 


IB 


MONEY FOR NOTHING 


SI 


CAPITAL MARKETS To £Partnenfup 

This is your chance m take a lucrative sfice of toe partnership in one of toe 
City's largest and most thriving firms, which is rarely out of the news. This is 
a reflection of toe figh-prafle workload it enjoys, and mans that the capital 
markets partner/senior associate it recruits needs to have a big City CV. 
Refi T44987 

EC/COMPETITION To £70,000 

The Brussels office of this cop 10 Gey practice Is no dull repository of all 
tomgs European in toe firm, fa frigb-proSe and very osmsfuf practice can 
only benefit the oreer of an EOcorrfwtition lawyer with 2-4 years' pqe who 
w* gam invaluable experience try being at toe centre of die EU. Ret T26479 

HONG KONG To £Ex pat package 

Life is as good as it always was m Hong Kong tor quality lawyers at quality 
ferns, fee this top 10 Gty practice. You wffl also receive a package chat wil 
enable you to make die best of it if you are a corporate/corporate finance 
lawyer with good experience and strong Mandarin language skills. 
Re£T25793 

EMPLOYMENT To £50.000 

This well-known medium-sized City firm has made great strides and 
continues to go from strength to strength. This means the prospects are 
unusually good tor an employment lawyer with 0-4 years' pqe in contentious 
and noo-corrorroous work. Ret T46I38 

PROPERTY To £35,000 

Not only wi toe newly qualified commercial propeny sofidtor who joins this 
highly-rejprtJed south London practice be pven immediate respontiMity and 
dwnt contact, but they wdl also enjoy a practice renowned for a spread of 
big and small work, partnership prospects and a friendly workplace. 
Refi T42065 

TAX To £65,000 


PROPERTY To £5 0.000 

Only consider joining this top tfl Gey firm if you are keen to make a long¬ 
term commitment, because that k whai it vriH make to you. You wffl enjoy 
genuine responsftafcy from the start and a true career path, if you have f-3 
years* commercial property pqe and enthusiasm to grow the practice. 
Refi T27747 

INSOLVENCY FAR EAST To £Partnenhip 

Given the sate af the far east economies, it is pertaps no swprise that this 
top 10 Gty firm is looking to send insolvency assistants at aU levels out a 
work in exciting Singapore, where the quality of Kfe outstrips even toe quaiky 
of work. Ttes a one-off opportunity to grab while jtju anRri:T46755 

PROPERTY To £35,000 

This very upwardly-mobile mid-sized Qty firm may offer junior property 
assistants work at toe hghesr quaSty, but it abo recognises that you need a 
life outside the office. That is why your bflling targets are low enough 
ensure that you will have more in life chan just development work. 
Refi 746705 

IN-HOU5E BANKING To £80,000 

This vnematioral farce house is agreat place to go in-house, or to take your 
employed oreer up to a new level, tf you are a capital markets bwyer wito 3-5 
years' pqe. AA the usual bank benefits and more if you can show aptitude in 
debt and espedaly equity capital markets work, and MBA. Refi T4&738 

LITIGATION WITH INSOLVENCY To £60,000 

Whether you are a litigator who wants to specialise to a degree in 

insolvency, or an insolvency htijpror who would like some more general 
work as weU, this top meefium-sbed practice is the one for you. k wi help 
your career go in whichever direction you want if you can show 2-6 years' 
pqe. RefcT46456 

M&A To £65,000 


This top 20 firm has quiedy petitioned itseff as one of toe leadaig corporate If you want a mane personal environment dun some top 20 Gty firms offer 
practices in toe City, meaning that das opening for a corporate tax bwyer but do not want to lose toe quafity of work, then this leading medium-seed 
wito 0-5 years' pqe would be good under any Qm imstances. But as you wtU Gty practice a the perfect answer. It wffl make a good home for an M&A 
have few astisnms above you, die pooemnJ here ureaBy great Ret; T39226 lawyer with 1-6 years'pqe and some YeBow Book experience. Refi T46576 


PROJECTS/CORPORATE To £100,000 

The London office of this very weil-known US firm shares toe firm-wide 
reputation for energy matters, making it a very exciting move for high quatay 


BANKING To £55,000 

As toe top end of toe legal market becomes ever mere ijfiusnjounjj, dus weO- 
known practice Is the lend that wffl prosper, ft ofers young banking assistants 


banking, corporate, project finance or energy lawyers with 2-6 years' pqe with 0-3 years’ pqe a workload that is anything but domesne as well as toe 


keen on the field A reputation gained here a worth a tot Ret T18751 


land of incentives that are also (onagn id many Gty firms. Refi T46440 


QD 


QtlAJiXt DOUCAU 


For further information, n complete confidence, please contact Nick Peacock, AJison Jacobs or Gavin Sharpe foE qualified 
lawyers) on 0171-405 6062 (0/7/-ZZS 0476 or 0171-731 5699 evenings/weekends) or write to them at QD Legal. 
37-41 Bedford Row, London WCIR 4JR Confidential fee 0171-631 6394. 


LONDON * EARNING HAH • LEEDS • fUKCHESTER - HONG KONG • PAWS * HEW TOM • SYDNEY * MEUOUUE • AMSTESDAH • TORONTO - VANCOUVER 


CHAMBERS 


'professional recruitment' 


23 LONG LANE LONDON EC IA 9HL TEL: 01 71-606 3344 (FAX: 0 I 71-600 f 793) 


Confidentiality 
Candidates applying to a new 
form are always anxious that 
rumours of their job applica¬ 
tion might leak back to their 
current employers. They are 
even more anxious if there are 
any personal links between the 
two firms. However good the 
vacancy, it will be passed over 
if the risks seem loo high. 

One of our candidates 
refused to see a firm recently 
because the daughter of his 
senior partner was an assistant 
solicitor there. Another was 
put off because the firm had 
wwked dosefy with bis parfc : 
nera on a recent piece oflitiga- 
rion. There are so many links 
between Jaw firms, that candi¬ 
dates are right to be wary. 

Using reliable recruitment 
consultants should help. They 
can take steps to make persoo- 
nel officers aware of any rides 
of leakage. They can insist 
that an application be treated 
confidentially within the 
firm, at least until a job-offer 
is cm the way. 

In our experience, person¬ 
nel departments arc aware of 
these risks, and will do their 
best to protect a candidate^ 
interests. It is important for 
them. too. to preserve their 
reputation for confidentiality. 
If word got around that they 
leaked information, their sup¬ 
ply of new recruits would 
soon dry up. 

Simon Anderson 


CHAMBERS' DIRECTORY 
Our toga) dredory is auabbte 
horn Bfcfios, (01403 -710 871) 


INDUSTRY Sonya Rayner, Fiona Boxall, Morwenna Lewis, ARcen Shepherd 


IT Lawyer: London 

Sdr vrith 2-3 yeas'ocanm expee and a gemuae interest 
in IT, to join sucoessfiil computer services otmgnny to 
devdop/review/negotme contracts. Must enjoy working 
as pan of a team in an infarmal emtirooment 

Legal Adviser: Central London 

Highly successful global property company seeks 
solicitor with c. 2-4 years’ pqe to provide advice and 
guidance on all its legal issues with a bias towards 
compaay/conuaercia] and corporate finance:. 

lT/Commerctal: London 

Larps consoler company seeks sdre. I-4yxs’pqe-with 
^expg; ofTT con trac ts who would hte the opport im ity of 
'goSgxmroivef^&buaness.En^Ueni package! 


Sole Lawyer: Northern Home Counties 
Solr or bore with 2-4 yrs* pqe to run legal and secretarial 
fimetkn ofleatfing consumer services cctqpaqy. Broad 

mirmyr cial «qyy. and sound taKrtt-ss afaise ffmmrial . 

Commercial Lawyer: M25 Corridor 
Lots of client contact for sdr or bair with 1-3 years', 
pqe in the expanding legal department of US credit: 
card processing company where cotumetciarexpcA 
presence, and enthusiasm for business are more 
i m po rt ant than technical abiliiy. Langnage s useful. 

Commercial Property: London 
Soiitifiorw&ta I-2-yeara'rooninierciaTproperf^ •- 
experi ence to jo in higb-calibre legal department of 

.Wfonniiiiia i- . --A . l-3- w *i 

wen-known property company. 


PRIVATE PRACTICE London: David Wooffson, Simon Anderson, Paul Thomas 
SOUTH: Noel Murray, Hedtey Walsh NORTH: Suki Bahra 


Construction Partner 
Large Qty firm wrtri strong ener^Mmshucture piactiDB 
seeks a turtoer construction partner, preferably wth a 
contentious Has, to he*? expend (Ms department 

Litigation Partner: City 
Lruge Qty firm seeks heavy hitting litigation partner to 
join at senior equity k\eL This is a real chance for an 
antoitkius lawyer to build an international tepatanan- 

Commerciai Property: City 

Niche nxnmcrdal firm requires a 1-3 year pqe 
solicitor to handle a broad caseload. Fast track career 
progression leading to partnership. 

Employment: City 

Mid sized City firm seeks 2-4 year qualified solicitor 
to assist a high profile employment partner. Very little 
corporate support wort and excellent prospects. 

Private Client: City 

t e nding City firm requires a solicitor with 1-3 years’ 
pqe to handle an expanding caseload to include tax, 
trust and estates planning work. 


Information Technology: City 
Tbp 20 Gty firm with growing JTcfient haseseete 2-4 
year qualified assistant to haodle a broad mix of work. 
Direct experience in the IT industry an advantage. - 

Tax:-City 

1 en ding corporate practice seeks ajurrior solicitor to. 
join established and reputable team advising high •• 
profileccnporaDonsaiHjindividBais.- 

Commercial Litigation: City 


a ssiintn ttohandlealB^hqqaBty txM i im ma a! fai gntipw 
cas e foad nx.an informal wodring environment 

Company/Commercial: West End 
h&xfia firm requires a srdidtorwhh 2-4 yeas’relevant 
experience to advise on a range of noa-coareotuxis: 
mtetea, including some corporate wort 

Company/Commercial: Surrey 


c5 years’ pqe. JP/TTexpaxaceasaKiaL City package. 





-> '9*V - * .‘5 7 

■S 





LA5MO is a substantial independent 
oil and gas exploration and production 
company whose shares are listed in 
the London, New York, Montreal and 
Toronto Stock Exchanges. 

1997 was a record year, with a turnover 
in excess of US$ 1 billion, a market 
capitalisation of U5S 4 billion and an 
international portfolio now extending to 
interests in thirteen countries. 


LASMO has a major business development programme underway which 
has created an increased and varied workload for the legal department, and 
accordingly an opportunity has arisen for a Legal Adviser to join our 
headquarters in the City. 


Legal Adviser 

London-City 


£ Excellent Package 


We seek a lawyer with between 2-5 years' post qualification 
experience which may have been gained in either private practice 
or industry. Previous experience of oil and gas work is essential. 
The work will be broad-ranging covering both North Sea and 
international projects where you will advise and negotiate at 
all project stages. You must be commercially minded and 
team-driven with a commitment to providing quality advice. 

This is an excellent opportunity for an ambitious lawyer to gain 
considerable involvement in the commercial as well as legal 
aspects of the industry and to succeed you must be a credible 
individual, capable of dealing with all levels of personnel. 

For further information, please contact our advising consultant 
Lindsey Newman on 0171 405 0151 (fax 0171 831 6498) 
or write to her at: 


In-House Legal, 1st Floor, 

High Holbom House, 

Ho I bom, London WC1V 6RL 
email: lindseynewman©hwgraup.com 
internet: http://www.hw.graup.com 


I V l-iiYr-J l\ 

.1 \ r lJ' : ./ 

>>£ 7-' s r s i 

!■' * • _J W ^ -.1^4 


COMPETITION LAWYERS 


The Office of Fair Trading exists to encourage and sustain 
competition in business at all levels, k is an independent 
non-pofitical depanment; established in 1973, and headed by 
the Director General of Fair Trading. It pfays a key role in 
the enforcement of competition taw. 

The Competition Bill currently before Parliament will 
introduce an entirely new regime that will ffve die f 
Director General enhanced powers to investigate 
and take action against agreements which restrict 
competition and conduce which is an abuse of 1 ffvj 
dominant position. This is an exciting and r\ yj 
challenging time for die OFT, and in order to help 
us meet that challenge we require energetic and *" 
emhuaastic lawyers. 

This is a superb opportunity do apply existing bw, advising 
the Director General and his officers on a range of matters 
including restrictive practices, monopolies, resale price 
maintenance and UK and EC mergers, lawyers wffl also be 
involved in the implementation of the new lave acquiring 
competition Jaw experience as the new n^foie develops. 


The successful applicants must be solicitors dr bdrrisc^ 
admitted or called in England and Wales ami may sdread 
nwe some experience of competition law, although thE 
onot essential They wffl relish the chance 

. The posts are based fo Central London and haw 
Cx* -'^.itag b tin 

/2lY P^^ rf .P^«^tn more senior posts 
(Where an applicant k rfexceptionalcamKeam 

sEy; a e ^^ wappofeT ^ 

ZZ''. a tl w*r maximum irey be con^dered) if w* 

please call Brter Rostron on 0171 211 8895 or P=« 
Edwards on 0171 211 8892. ™ 

To obtain an application form please - : 

Chancery Lane, London WQA JSP 0^017*?, 
Fax:0l7l 211 8553). ' “ 0,7t 2J1 87536 

Qosfog date for appficaticms 24 February ,99ft. 




OFFICE OF FAIR TRADING 






1 ■ 




































43 


THE.TIMES ■TUESDAY FEBRUARY 101998 


TO ADVERTISE CALL 
01716806828 


LEGAL APPOINTMENTS 


0171 782 7899 


INVESTMENT BANKING 


JWony of oar ffobajjmwrtnicflt banking cBentt.ho*erecentty qddnx^thdrrcai^tmentplans for 1998. 
Here fbflowp a Detection of some of the opportunities that exist in US, Japanese and European banks. 


BA NKING/M &A • To £80,000 

2?*****#* and rejponsfcte nth n a teadtag namxkxai tankw^sce a 
lawyer wfch 4 yrara 1 pqe support the emgr g b & marten tor cOT n m t talking ttani 
™"V w tootency-febax} brick, and abajMTC mti-ftml advise oo USA. The 

WoJ«isifie i jrnponant*rfilieJt4>.RidtTB4M7i4 

ASSET MANAGEMENT ^ To £90,000 

. T 5 "* ™ TO front One of aotc ni^BKa wwic by 

: !***« *k mariux-teufing name. You will need 5+ yean* pqe, good atuc 
tmpmnc experience and Meaty Fh»xfc German or baton tUk Bsperiaux 
™»*Kton*would be eMmbeav.lta£TB46757 

EQUITY.CAPITAL MARKETS Tbtl 10,000 

You wO ber^r hi the thick cf things advbfrj; the equhy opal nsrtecs twn of 
sret bfnous finanoehwise oa a range of^obal equkjr oSeringi an M the leadfrg 
, i «o<Vxxchan^*w^ *e world So KweaM ^lOytars'ptje and Experience 
ofUS equity ofcriqp; you *0 have a confident personafey. ReETBCMOff 

CORPORATBDEBT : fo'ilOfltOOO* 

There w* be every opportunity far die 6-7 yean quaHod corporate taper vto 
'pfcB tfb TOrankuwItankw move foo the bushes tide in time, which Is what 
The perswi you are replacing <fid. Ar. Srst,you w» be wpl** on a locofjtasta 
itarera in pankubr, mtoty on thei debt skfcvRe£TB4fi834 ■ - 


BANKING/RNANCIAL SERVICES To 00,000 package 

tf the City tanking heayywetoto am not quite you. then how about dm famous 

street real rang It his a very, inreresting opening far > taper with 3-5 
yean* pqe oo deaf wtth a wide range of retail banking issues in a snail and 
reipet^ team. The padogBcJera a sarfrg erf super benefits. ReETEMCTBO 

ASSETMANAGEMENT To £100,000 

Thtt fa very much a fronfroflfcg rote for die asset mana geme nt lawyer with 5+ 
years' pqe who mate an noCgenicarecr move m this leafing martas name. It 
means you must be able to handte styrffleanc retpomUSiy and some erf die 
btdnas's top people. Ex p e rie n ce of the US system would help. Ret TB46757 

EMERGING MARKETS . To £100,000 

ITk nature t/mriogh emerging jrnvkmnnnsttanvdb a b(g pan of the 
Job. If dot a whar you want then lode no further than this top emerging rmrioco. 
asm. unhid) needs a general banlrinfcapio) markers or cwporace lawyer wi t h 2- 
5 yean' pqe and an Merest, f not experience. In die field. Re£TB43569 

PRINCIPAL. FINANCE To £150,000 

An ouDsxsndng opportunity id more ken a quaP^ejp] role with one of die tearing 
principal finance cams In die Gey. Fan moving, co mm ercial, exciting and 
newsworthy work; ftits ■ not a donee id be missed far a 2n5 yearrf pqe lawn* 
bwyer. UTMS70S 


. QUAWtY DOOCAU. 


Phase col Seems Hoar. Mkfceflo McGregor or William Cock (<A quaffed tayes) on 0(71-405 6062 (U/7M095727 or 
. 0171-792 0475 oenlnpA/eekentls) or t b atraMf write to diem cl QD Lmgat - Benfcfng. 

■ jr^lRa^l^.LanimVKlR^Co^kk^(ac0l7t-a3i&m. 



The Qnmbero of Mr Ami Fedor, Lamb Bonding, 
EC4 are pleased to announce that: 


Mr K^cbidl Batman 
• {formerly of 9 Kings’ Bench Walk EC4) 

; has joined chambers; and that 

Mbs C. Joy Dykers and Mr Paul Bitmead 
have accepted invitations to join chambers 
fpBowfng the successful completion of their pupillage. 


Members of Chambers 


Mr Am! Fedcr 
Mr Kcnneth Wheeler 
Mr'Ivan KroHdc 
Mn 1 Maureen Mullally 
MrVIctorLeveDe 
Mr.David Edlin 
Mr John Fox 
Mr Anthony Edie 
Mr John Waters 

Mr Jaemy Gadoa 

ftrfiss Jacc pe lqte Peiiy. 

Mr Spenser EQllard .. 

Mr juan Barton 
Mr Michael Hi t man . 

[Miss Angela Hbdes 
[Mr Mictmd HaStai 
,Mr J. Lavid Cook 

; . ■'f'.AiJw 

■ ' 1 ■ 1 " "IT 'S . 


Miss CTiritfa Holden 
; Mr Jlichard Roberts 
Miss Deborah Sawbney 
Mr Bernard Richmond 
Miss Smannah Cooerill 
Miss M. Jane. Terry 
Mr Jeremy Hanghty 
Miss R. Frances ECntfle 
Mr David Brooqger 
Mr J. Seamus Kearney 
Ms Anita Geser 
Miss Lindsay Weinstien 
Mr Paul Crunpni 
Mr Joanne RomweD 
Mr Martin Cole 
Miss C. Joy Dykexs 
Mr Paul Bitmmd 


ROPEWALK CHAMBERS 

NOTTINGHAM 

Chambers of Richard Maxwell Q.C. 

Am pteiod to armouries thto Doughi HmbM calad 1973, Rknaad 
ScMfarook catod 1987 and Jam Cent caMd 1982 (oH feanwrly d St 
Uv/a Chambers. SO Mgh Pammart, Nottingham) Kav* loinsd Fkipawralc 
Qwnbara. Noonghwo. 


1988 

1984 

1972 

1962 

1977 

1984 
1885 
1983 
1967 
1988 
1972 
1873 
19178 
1977 
1977 
1980 

1982 

1983 
1884 

1985 
1985 
1988 
1987 
1987 

1987 

1988 
1889 
1982 

1982 

1983 

1893 
1983 
1985 

1894 


Mr Metaatl Maxwri Q.C. ftsea) 
Mr W£. Woodwurt OC. (16 
Ik M hony Sddiftajb OC. 

Mr Ian McUmsi Q.C. 

Mr RJF. Oman OjC. 

18 Hchwd Papin 
llr QJkL Jarand 
Ur Orahwi UacMn 
MrHchvd H. Buns 
Mr ndwd Suaki 
Mr Anttwny BurWad 
Ur Dougiss Herbert 
Mr Stophan Berwtorf 
Ur Sbnon Gash 
Was Maon Hampton 
Ur Simon Baird 
Mas iayna Mams 
Mbs HoaaBnd Coa 
Ur Soot On 
18 DornHc No ton 
Max Bryony Clark 
Mr Andrew Pia s twich 
Mr Pafetok Umb 
Mr Andrew rOgMineeM 
Mr Bfchud Saahnx* 

Mr FMpTurton 
Ur Toby SMwart 
18 Jorattun MKhM 
Mr Jaaon Cox 
Mas Dabocah Onto 
Mss Bbataadi Hodgson 
Mm Hotel IMmi 
Mn HaMar McCowui 
Prtooosnr Mchaai Bridga 

Clark to OiMfcar*- Onto Austin 


24 THE ROPEWALK, NOTTINGHAM. NG1 

DocBoart Brehanos. 18060 NOTTINGHAM 17 


5EF 


TH> OllS 847 2S81 
FAX- 0115 847 6532 
W7SSNE7 0440. ADDRESS 8 
mp—8rmiSi 


BURTON COPELAND 

SOLICITORS 

'The'partners-are-pleased 
' .• . ‘to announce that 

MARK HASLAM 

joined the ; :rm on 1st January 1998 

* 51 Lincoln’s Inn fields 

. . London VVC2A 3LZ 
Tel: 0171 430 2277 


Small and (tynhHte yddat family law 
practice, operating at ihe highest levels, seeks 
two soliritors, 1-4 years post quabficaiion 
experience (or suitably qualified legal executive) 
to join its committed Central London team this 
June. 

We will offer a happy environment, good pay 
and a top quality practice in return for 
competence, dedication and hard work. 

AppV to Box No 9941 


nWMTX MMSTMT - DOKSET - 


S3& 


With 

ssi 1 st pHUM TniUiar ttsln- 

toq Bsaflabto. K a cu loaaM * 

c wff « w, (tori 14 _ DoT " 
SttMTiWata. WlX 3TB. 7M, 

0X747 828W7, To 01747 

83BQ47._ 


Tin A L'AUKKR 
THAT ISN'T ITX; U. 


So fr* 


toed 25-33. or dnse of send 

scadnie hsefesmuod to be mined* 

the hlabca s tsnit n i d «bh ton of toll 

profit potidpotnn wttto 2-3 )“». 

dr. mark Martin 
0171240 8820 


THE MAMW OWEMSaON 



Are you a ' 
dynamic go-getter? 
Leading W1 law firm 
seek comm Property 
lawyer 3-4 yre PQE. 
Exc p'ship prospects far 
above average lawyer 
£40-45K. Call: 0171 
583 0566 (Agy) 


The Peachell Group 


Tor confidential advice on 
moving in-house into 
banking or commerce, 
contact one of onr 
consultants: 

Laurence Munoz 
Seema Kapoor 
SueBown 


The Bar Theatrical Society 
presents 

Oliver Goldsmith’s 

She Stoops to 
Conquer 

For the 125th Anniversary 
of the 

Barristers’ Benelovent 
Association 

17th-21th February 

Old Hall, Lincoln’s Inn 
Box Office: 

0171-400 8509 
Fax: 0171-405 7456 ' 
Tickets £25 single, 

£40 double 
£10 OAPs, Students 

(by. kin d permission of the Masters of 
the Bench of Lincoln's Inn) 


raBilS&TlMES 



LEGAL 

APPOINTMENTS 

Forthcoming Features 


Feb 17th: 
May 26 tbz 


Manchester and the North Wert 
Birmingham ami the Midland, 


June 30th: . Bristol and the South West 

Sept/Ocu Australia and New Zealand 


Times will tocos cm a specific area of the country, focusing and informing on local legal issues, 
gach month The inies ^ ^ available for corporate and recruitment advertising, 

ibae is limited space so please book well in advance. 

et F.PHONE: 0171 680 6830/6831 FAX: 017) 782 7899 


In-House Lawyers 

Banking - City 

Our client is a major high street Bank. 

Two experienced lawyers are now sought to join dynamic 
teams operating within the Bank's in-house legal department. 
Both challenging roles offer a broad range of work and 
opportunities, close liaison with client departments and all the 
usual advantages of working in-house. 

Retail Banking Lawyer 

A senior lawyer is sought, ideally with around 5PQE to join the 
team dealing with banking and consumer products (including 
card schemes) and general contract/commercial work. 

Corporate Banking Lawyer 

A lawyer with 1-3PQE is sought to join the department 
specialising in corporate loan and security documentation, 
dealing with major corporate customers of the Bank and their 
professional representatives. Good drafting and negotiating 
skills essential. 

The ideal candidates will have good interpersonal skills and 
the enthusiasm to thrive on the demands and pressures 
inherent in servicing the department's clients. Both 
opportunities offer competitive salary packages. 


A 


UPSON 

UOYB 

JONES 


To discuss the potential 
offered by these 
exceptional opportunities, 
contact 

Marian Lloyd-Jones, 

in confidence. 


UPSON LLOYD-JONES 

LEGAL RECRUITMENT 


1 27 Cbeapside 


London 


EC2V6BT 


Tel 0171 600 1690 


WANTED, 
ILAWYERS 
TO DEFEND 
THE 

COUNTRY 


Msr.-b*'j iTTha Sec; si 
profession, fness sre the 'acts. 
‘AT '.vair. nicirech-:' lawyers. 

We need Dfflcersio work in 
i-;lirary iaiv. To prepare and 
prosecute esses before ecu ns 
maniai. Advise soldiers and 
rneii f emi.ic-5. And Uto enjoy 
navei and seen. 

VVs thersfo'e put it to yoo 
that you would enjey a most . 
challenging, stinvjiatmc and 
vsriacl careen So. consider 


ARMY 

BE THE BEST 


Whiten applications, with CVand 
daytime phone number should 
be sent U) U. Col. P.D- McEvoy, 
AGC {ALSJ MOD, Trenchant Lines, 
Upavon; Nr Pewsey, Wrttshfre 
SNfffiBE. by Z7ttiftbruafy 1598. 
Applicants should beZJ-S5 year 
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44 LAW 


\S**‘ 


Court of Appeal 


Law Report February 101998 


Restraining breach of copyright 


THE TIMES TT TF.S DAY FEBRUARY 101998 

Court of Appeal ,!- q 

_aah !^I 


Compelled interview can; 1 


Phonographic Performance 
Ltd v Maitra and Others* 
Performing Right Society 
Ltd,Interveners 
Before Lord Woolf. Master of the 
Rolls, Lord Justice Aldous and 
Lord Justice Mummery 
[Judgment February 3] 

A copyright owner or assignee 
should, ordinarily, be granted an 
injunction with immediate effect 
and without express time limit 
where a defendant had infringed, 
and threatened to continue to 
infringe his copyright. 

The Coin of Appeal so held in a 
reserved judgment allowing ap¬ 
peals of the plaintiff 1 . Phono¬ 
graphic Performance Ltd. against 
derisions of Mr Justice Chadwick 
in the Chancery Division on June 
W. 1907 to restrict the injunctions 
he Granted following judgment in 
default of defence against the 
defendants. Simon Andrew. Nick 
Rose and the Underworld 
(Bradford) Ltd for breach of copy¬ 
right {The Times July W. |Q97; 
1!W| 3 All ER 073). The appeal 
against an order made against 
Saihal Maitra was not pursued. 

Mr Pteter Goldsmith. QC. Mr 
Jonathan Rayner Janies. QC and 
Miss Amanda Michaels for PPL 
Miss Maty Vitoria. QC for the 
ftriorming Right Society Ltd. 
interveners: Mr Michael 
Silverlear. QC as amicus curiae. 

THE MASTER OF THE 
ROLLS, giving thejudgment of the 
court, said that the appeal raised 
the question of what was the 
appropriate order to be made 
when final judgment for infringe¬ 
ment of copyright was given in 
favour of the PPL in default of 
defence. 


PPL as assignees, administered 
on behalf of the vast majority of 
record companies, the performing, 
broadcasting and cable pro¬ 
gramme rights in their sound 
recordings. Like other collecting 
societies. PPL operated a number 
of standard tariffs for annual 
licences. A person who Look a 
licence was entitled to use all of the 
recordings in the repertoire of 
PPL's member companies. 

PPL had for many years sought 
and obtained from the judges of 
the Chancery Division final judg¬ 
ment in default against persons 
using the repertoire who had failed 
to take a licence. The orders 
included an injunction to restrain 
further infringement in the normal 
form, that is. with immediate effect 
and withour an express limit of 
rime. 

in the present cases the judge 
had limited the injunction by 
providing that it should take effect 
28 days after the date of the order 
and should continue for only seven 
months. The issue was whether the 
judge had been right to refuse to 
grant an injunction without the 
two limbs or the proviso. 

The practice of PPL was to 
require a person who applied for a 
licence to rake the licence bom the 
first day that the person used the 
repertoire. Thus a person who 
infringed would only be granted a 
licence when he had regularised 
his position. Similarly a person 
who had been injuncted would not 
be granted a licence if he did not 
pay the appropriate licence fee in 
respect of the rime when he had 
infringed. 

The judge had been concerned at 
the practice of PPL using an 
injunction of unlimited duration as 
a lever to extract payment of past 


fees, a practice he regarded as an 
abuse of process. 

PPL submined thar where a 
plaintiff established that his copy¬ 
right had been infringed and there 
was a threat of further infringe¬ 
ment he was auitted as of course to 
an injunction to prevent the defen¬ 
dant from carrying out further 
infringements. 

Their Lordships accepted that 
when a person established 
infringement of copyright and a 
threat to continue infringement, an 
injunction would in the ordinary 
case be granted without restric¬ 
tion. That was especially true 
when the defendant took no part in 
the proceedings. 

But the court, when granting an 
injunction, was still required to 
exercise a discretion and in so 
doing there could be circum- 
srances where restriction or refusal 
of an injunction would be war¬ 
ranted. Their Lordships did not 
believe that such circumstances 
arose in the present case or would 
normally do so in similar cases. 

A person who exploited his 
properly right by licensing was 
entitled, unless there were special 
circumstances, ro prevent another 
from using that property right 
without his licence and to refuse to 
grant a licence save on his terms 
and conditions as to payment and 
use. 

Where the defendant did not 
contest the allegation in the PPL'S 
statement of claim, was well aware 
of PPL"s rights and that he was 
infringing and showed an inten¬ 
tion to continue to infringe, the 
court could see no reason why the 
use of an injunction in the norma] 
form to prevent further infringe¬ 
ment could be an abuse. 

No doubt the consequence was 


that a defendant was forced to pay 
if he unshed to use the repertoire, 
but PPL were entitled k> use the 
rights assigned to them for the 
purpose of requiring payment of 
foes in return for a licence to do 
what would, in the absence of a 
licence, be an infringement of the 
rights. 

There bad been no grounds for 
suspending the injunction for 28 
days to provide time for negotia¬ 
tion. The defendant had. with frill 
knowledge of the position, dis¬ 
regarded the proprietary rights of 
PPL To allow him a further 2S 
days of infringement, which could 
also be 3 criminal offence ureter 
section I07(3)(b) of the Copyright, 

Designs and Patents Act 1988. was 
wrong. 

The second limb of the proviso 
was intended to ensure that the 
injunction did not continue for a 
period longer than was necessary 
to protect PPL's rights. The pur¬ 
pose of such a limitation in tune 
was to prevent PPL using the 
threat of committal to mate the 
defendant pay further licence fees. 

Where unauthorised use of 
PPL'S copyright was taking pi are. 
their Lordships did not believe it 
was an abuse to refuse 10 license 
that copyright without an appro¬ 
priate payment for past use and an 
agreement for future use. Nor was 
it an abuse for PPL to require 
compliance with an injunction 
either by the person refraining 
from using the repertoire or by 
paying for such use that had taken 
place and would take place. 

It had been suggested by Mr 
Silverteaf that it might be appro¬ 
priate in the present circum¬ 
stances. where licences were 
available, ro refuse to grant an 
injunction at all as damages would 


be an adequate remedy and, if 
necessary, to award damages in 
lieu of an injunction under section 
SO of the Supreme Court Act 1981. 
That, it was said, wwkl refieetthe 
position and provide appropriate 
relief - as PPL's desire was to 
maximise their return and not to 
refuse licences. 

Such a course would not be 
sufficient to safeguard the rights of 
PPL for four reasons. 

1 Tbe defendants had an intention 

to continue to infringe PPL'S 

rights. An injunction was the 
a pp ropr ia te remedy to prevent that 
intention being earned out 

2 Calculation of the damages for 
future infringements of copyright 
in lieu of the injunction would nor 
be practical, as it would not be 
possible to estimate the length of 
time the infringement would con¬ 
tinue. Damages were rarefy an 
appropriate remedy for unlicensed 
future use of copyright. 

3 FPL were, the owners of a 
statutory property right which 
they were seeking to enforce in the 
same way as they had done for 
many years. It would be surpris¬ 
ing, absent special orcumstanoes. 
if the court framed an injunction in 
terms which would license a 
defendant's activities when Par¬ 
liament. in the 1988 Act. did not 
consider it was right to do so. 

4 There was no reason why a court 
should have any sympathy with a 
defendant who was aware of PPL'S 
rights and that he was infrin g in g 
diem and then showed an inten¬ 
tion to continue to do so. 

Solicitors: Hamlin Stowe, Ox¬ 
ford Circus and Green Sheikh <S 
Co. Marylebone; Mr N. 
Koonoupias, Oxford Circus; Trea¬ 
sury Sofiritor. 



m 



Regina v Secretary of State 
for Trade and Industry, Ex 
parte McCormick 
Before Lord Justice Morritt, Lord 
Justice Waiter and Sir Christopher 
Slaughter 

{Judgment February 5] 

The Secretary of State far Trade 
and Industry was entitied toderide 
that in proceedings for the dis¬ 
qualification of a company direo 
- for. she woo Id use transcripts of 
the evidence- which the director 
was compelled under section 434 of 
the companies Act 1985 to give to 
inspectors appointed by the sec¬ 
retary of state to investigate his 
company's affairs. 

The Court of Appeal so seated 
dismissing an appeal by the direc¬ 
tor. David Austin McCormick, 
from the dismissal by Mr Justice 
Rimer oa December 18,1997 of his 
application for judicial review of 
tte derision of the secretary of state 
dated May 2L1997 confirming dial 
die intended to use the transcripts 
of the evidence given by the 
director to inspectors appointed by 
hfcr to investigate and report on the 
affairs of his company. Atlantic 
Computers pic and its subsidiary, 
Atlantic Systems pic The director 
had sought an order of certiorari to 
quash that decision and a declara¬ 
tion that it was unlawful. 

Mr Matthew Codings for Mr 
McCormick: Mr Roger Kaye. QC 
and Mr James Eadie for the 
secretary of state. 


Burden on Revenue Special needs power limited 


Hurley vTaylor (Inspector of 
Taxes) 

Before Mr Justice Park 
JJudgment January 20| 

On an appeal by a taxpayer 
against extended lime limit assess¬ 
ments under section 26 of the 
Taxes Management Ad 1970. the 
burden of prosing a loss of tax 
attributable to fraud or negligent 
conduct by the taxpayer lay on the 
Revenue. 

The burden was not discharged 
by the commissioners, who. while 
not rejecting the taxpayer’s 
explanation of deficiencies shown 
in capital statements, did nor 
accept it either. 

Mr Justice Park so held in the 
Chancery Division allowing an 
appeal by Mr Anthony C. Hurley 
from part of the determination by 
Bromley general commissioners 
relating to back duty assessments 
to Schedule D income tax for years 
from 1983 to 1987. 

Mr C. R. A. Argles for the 
taxpayer: Mr Bruce Carr for the 
Revenue. 


MR JUSTICE PARK said that 
the Revenue could discharge the 
section 36 burden simply-tyriap- - • Orp ing t on;- Sobritor 
ital statements showing that the Revenue. ' 


taxpayer had more money to spend 
than his declared income 
suggested. 

Whether that burden was so 
discharged depended on rbe tax¬ 
payer tendering any explanation of 
the deficiencies and. if he did. on 
how the commissioners viewed his 
explanation, if he advanced an 
explanation but the commissioners 
rejected it, that is. they positively 
disbelieved it, the capital state¬ 
ments by themselves could dis¬ 
charge the burden. 

But if the taxpayer advanced an 
explanation fait the commis¬ 
sioners. while not rejecting it. did 
nor accept it either, that is they 
were not satisfied on the balance of 
probabilities that it was untrue but 
were not satisfied on the balance of 
probabilities that it was true either, 
the capita 1 statements by them- 
sefves were not sufficient. 

In .such circumstances the 
commissioners' derision might be 
challenged try the Revenue on 
appeal to the High Cburt but only 
on the grounds laid down by die 
House of Lords in Edwards v 
Bairstow Q195bl AC 14k 

Solicitors: T. G. Baynes & Sons, 
of Inland 


G v Wakefield City Metropol¬ 
itan District Council and 
Another 

Before Mr Justice Laws 
[Judgment January 29] 

In considering whether proper 
provision bad been made for a 
child's needs the Special Educa¬ 
tional Needs Tribunal had no 
power id consider domestic 
circumstances or conditions unless 
those matters related directly to a 
child's learning difficulties. 

Mr Justice Laws so held in die 
Queens Bench Division in 
dismissing G* appeal against the 
derision of the Special Educational 
Needs Tribunal of February 19. 
1997 not to amend her daughter's 
statement of special educational 
needs so as to specify the use of a 
residential special school. 

G was the mother of a severely 
disabled child. She had found it 
difficult to provide necessary care 
for her daughter because of her 
own disability and because vol¬ 
untarily provided weekend respite 
care for her daughter was no 
longer available. 

Although the tribunal had con¬ 
cluded in its derision that residen¬ 
tial education wasn^r necessary, it 
did say that in itsabsenbe'the total 


education authority should mate a 
request under section 322 of the 
Education Act 1996 for respite care 
provision - from the local 
authority's- social services 
department 

Section 322 provides^(l) Where 
it appears to a local education 
authority that any health authority 
or local authority could, by taking 
any specified action, help in the 
exercise of any of their 
under this Part they may 
the help of the authority. .- 
the action in question.” 

Mr John Friel for G; Lord 
Campbell of AUoway. QC and Mr 
Lachlan Wilson for the local au¬ 
thority; the tribunal did not 
appear. 

MR JUSTICE LAWS said that 
Mr Friel had submitted that the 
tribunal's decision was flawed by a 
want of procedural fairness, 
because the possible deployment of 
section 322 was not raised at the 
hearing or at any other stage, so 
that the first the appellant knew of 
it was when she saw the derision. 

Lord Campbell submitted that 
the tribunal's reference to section 
322 went beyond any issue cog¬ 
nizable in the appeal, since any 
provision uf respite care by social 


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services would not amount to 
educational provision designed to 
meet special educational needs 
and would therefore fall outwith 
the matters to which, alone, die 
tribunal could direct its consid¬ 
eration under section 326 of the 
1996 Act. 

It was obvious to his Lordship . 
that the co nc e pts of "teaming 
difficulty" and “special educational 
provision" were not tightly de¬ 
fined What was dear was that 
measures taken fry a local edu¬ 
cation authority which were sub¬ 
ject to appeal before the tribunal 
had to be directly related to the 
child's (earning difficulties. 

Economic problems faced fay the 
child's parents, where, for exam¬ 
ple. different and perhaps more 
spacious living accommodation 
would in an ideal world be suitable 
for the famfly because of the child’s 
physical disability. were not or¬ 
dinarily within the remit of the 
tribunal. 

Nat were difficulties associated 
with a parent's disabilities where 
the effect was that the child was. in 
physical terms, more difficult id 
fook after. Such problems would 
fall to be dealt with par under die . 
1996 Act but. so far as they might,. 
be met by public pfwrction. mimf 
soda! welfare legislation. 

As a matter of common sense 
and ordinary human experience 
conditions in the home were al¬ 
most always bound to have some 
effect, for better or worse, on a 
child's learning capacity and 
educational chances. 

That was a general fact of famfly 
life but for present purposes it had 
to be distinguished from rircum- 
stances, which it was dearly 
possible to envisage, where some 
kinds of day to day domestic 
problems directly related to the 
child's learning difficulties. Such 
direct relation had to be shown in 
order to involve such problems in 
the tribunals jurisdiction under 
section 326. 

Given the tribunal's conclusion 
that the child was getting more 
than satisfactory education at her 
present school it seemed to his 
Lordship that the reference to 
section 322 constituted a recom¬ 
mendation for action that would be 
outside special educational 
provision. 

In those circumstances, his 
Lordship did not consider that Mr 
Friel* argument that die tribunal 
decision was vitiated by want of 
fairness was made ouL 

Solicitors: Ridley & HalL 
Huddersfield; Mr James Hob. 
Wakefield. 


LORD JUSTICE MORRITT 
said that the grounds for the 
application stemmed from the 
derision of the European Court of 
Human Rights in Saunders v 
United ■ Kingdom (The Times 
December l& 1996s; 09971 BCC 
872). 

The prosecution bad relied an 
the answers given by Mr Saunders 
to the inspectors before he was 
charged with the offences for 
which he was prosecuted. Mr 
Saunders was convi c te d and his 

appeal was dismissed. 

He then applied to the European 
Court of Human Rights churning 
that the use of such answers was 
an infringement of article 6J of the 
Convention for the Protection'of 
Human Rights and Fundamental 
Freedoms (1953) (Crad 8969). His 
complaint was upheld. 

In consequence of and since that 
derisim, the secretary of state 
fanned and applied a policy of rrot 
using against the accused in 
criminal proceedings transcripts of 
compelled evidence given by him 
to inspectors whether befo re or 
after he was charged. 

It was notdispirted that director 
disqualification proceedings did 


notirrvoJvra “criminal charge* as 
. '-those words were used and under-' 
stood b the domestic law of 
England. 

But it was common ground that 
the question would have to be 
determined in accordance with the 
jurisprudence of the European 
Court of Human Rights. However 
as foe European Convention had 
not yd been moorporatef into the 
domestic law of England die c ourt 
was not concerned with the direct 
application of article 6J. 

7he refevanoe of the point waste 
impact an the proper exercise of 
the secrehuy of slate* power to use 
the transcripts of the evidence of 
the director. . . 

If it were dear that the proceed¬ 
ings did involve a cr iminal charge 
then prima fade such _ power 
should be exercised so as so give, 
effect to the obligations of the 
Untied Kingdom m such a case 
rather than in breach of them. 

Counsel far the director sad that 
it was dear. His Lordship did not 
accept that submission. 

U was established by the juris¬ 
prudence of the EuropcanCcairt of 
Homan Rights that if the domestic 
law classified the proceedings as 
criminal then they roust be treated 
as involving a criminal charge for 
the purpose of article 6.L 
If the proceedings were not so 
classified then the question would 
depend on the nature and severity 
of the penalty to which those who 
committed the relevant act made 
themselves liable. 

The combination of several de¬ 
cisions of the European Court of 
Human Rights ami a consid¬ 
eration of the nature and s ev erity 
of a disqualification order ap¬ 
peared to his Lordship to cast a 
very real doubt an the proposition’. 
that proceedings for such an order' 
involved a criminal charge 
The disqualification order dig- 
not prevent the person subject twte. 
terms carrying-on anycommariat 
activity in bis own name save t hro e. . 
of a receiver, bentidator or crater 
party p romoter; us effect wax ta- 
remoye the p-irifege of doing s*# 
through a company with tinrittdl 

liability ; 

The consequences of the renter '• 
were serious for the' individual 
concerned and had been described- 
as penal butlhey did not involve a 
deprivation offiberty, livelihood or. 
property. 

In his Lordsbiprs judgment it .' 
was dear that the secretary of state “ 
was not bound in exercising her 
statutory powers to treat such 
proceedings as if they involved a. 
criminal charge rather than the 
determination of civil .rights and 
obligations. 


Cgunsd for the director submit¬ 
ted in the aftemain* tfctf as artKte 
6.1 applied also to the dMHTO- 
indtion of dvfl rights and obBga- 
tioos, the secretary of stale was 
bound to fo&w the same proce¬ 
dure in such proceedings as she 
applied to proceedings involving a 

criminal charge. 

His Lordship did not accept mat 
submission either. Irwas true dial 
in eadua* the person m quesOT 
was aimed to a “fair and pub fa 
hearing 1 ’. But the requiremenr o 
. fainiessdidnotnecesKrifyrequir 
the same treat m ent in dvfl cases a- 
in criminal- That was ctearl 
recognised in (he derision of tfc ■ 
European Own of Human Rigfr 
in Dombo Beheer BV v Th - 
Netherlands fll993j Series A N 
274/3). 

Moreover, it was apparent (ha 
the decision of the EurppeanCour r 
of Human Rights in. Sounder'. 
which fed to the policy of the 
secretary of state with regard to the. 
use. of axnpdfed evidence in 
criminal cases was inapplicable to ; 
dvfl cases. 

There was no question of the use 
of the compelled evidence in dis¬ 
qualification. proceedings involv¬ 
ing any infringement of the right .' 
not to incriminate oneself unless 
the issue in the proceedings in¬ 
volved a criminal charge. But, as 
his Lordship had already derided, 
die secretary of state was not 
bound to exerdse her discretion on - 
the basis that it did. 

In any even! the use of the 
processes of discovery and 
interrogatories involved foe use of 
compelled evidence in dvfl , 
proceedings because of the rules of- 
court which permitted them. But 
those rules were designed to pro¬ 
duce a fair triaL 
It would not be sensible to allow 
the evidence independent of the 
will of the person in question in die : 
form of the report and any docu¬ 
ments produced to the inspectors 
by the witness but exdude the 
witness X apbrndon of the fatter 
which: justified an opinion or fact 
seroat in the former. 

Given ton the secretary of slate 
was* not bound ro exercise her 
powe rs on the footing that dis- 
,< P«lKw'at ron procee ding s involved 
iMt a criminal charge <but the 
droe mri natian af a dvfl right and 
obligation, his Lordstrip saw no 
reason why she. should conclude 
that a fair hearing required her to 
abstain from using the director's 
evidence to the inspectors. 

Lewd Jostke Wallof agreed foul 
Sir Christopher Staaghrtxn deliv¬ 
ered a concurring jud gment. • 
Sotidtore: Boers & Pfetersf Trea¬ 
sury Solicitor •* \ 



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Risk of injustice over inference 


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IKjjhxil’ffiiffiO 
Before Lord Bingham of CominU,. 
Lord Chief Justice, Mr Justice 
Garland and Mr Justice Rix 
podgment January 201 
The requirement that the jury had 
to be satisfied that the prosecution 
had established a case to answer 
was an essential precondition to 
their drawing any inference from a 
defendant's failure to testify under 
section 35 of the Criminal Justice 
and Public Order Act 1994. 

Where therefore a judge failed to 
direct the jury- on that pre¬ 
condition, either in the terms of tbe 
standard direction (see R v Cowan 
1(1996] QB 373) or in similar terms, 
a dear risk of injustice arose. 

The Court of Appeal so stated 
when allowing an appeal fay Keith 
Bircfaall against his conviction for 
murder bdbre Mr Justice Latham 
and a jury at Nottingham in 
March 1996. The court concluded 
that the judge's omission to direct 
the jury on that precondition 
together with new evidence admit¬ 
ted on the appeal rendered tie 
conviction unsafe. The Crown did 
not seek a retriaL 

In Cowan (at pp379 and 3SIJ the 
Coon of Appeal had considered 
and approved a model direction 
promulgated by the judicial stud¬ 
ies hoard in relation to, inter alia, 
"essential (4)” which required that 


Ji H 
£ 


the jury had In have found there to >' 
be a case to answer on the 
prosecution evidence before draw¬ 
ing an adverse infcroice from die 
defendants silence. 




to 


Mr Roy Amkx. QC, Mr Anthony 
Jennings and Mr David Emanuel ' 
for Mr BocbalL Mr Peter. Joyce;. 
QC and Mr Avik Mukherjee for 
the prosecution. 


THE LORD CHIEF JUSTICE 
said that the Crown accepted that 
the judge had omitted to direct the 
jury on “essential (4)” bat 'bad 
contended that the omission-was 
immaterial because there was ' 
plainly a prima fade case. 

His Lordship said that the court 
was reluctant to countenance the 1 
view that direction of ajoxy'cafled 
for the mouthing of a number of 
mandatory formulae, and depar¬ 
ture fay a trial judge from a 
prescribed form of words would by 
no means always justify the upset, 
ting- of a jurys verdict. 

Standard directions were; how¬ 
ever. devised to serve the ends of 
justice and' the court had to be 
astute to ensure that those ends 
were not jeopardised-by iailure to 
give directions where they *wre 
called far. 

The drawing of inferences from 
silence was a particularly sensitive 1 
area. Many respected authorities 
had voiced the fearthar section 35 


wrongful convictions. 

It seemed possible that the 
application of those provisi o ns 
could lead to derisions adverse m 
the United Kingdom at Strasbourg 
under articles 6(1) and tip} of the 
European ConvwtionJ far the 
Protection of Human Rights and 
Fundamental Freedom? (1953) 
(Cmd 8969) unless those provisions 
were die subject of 'carefully 
framed dirariora tojuriefc. 

Inescapable' kigk demanded 
that a jmy should notlstfor to 
consider whether to draw in- 
ferences from a defendant 4 !: failure 
to rive oral evidence at his trial 
until they had concluded that the 
Crmws case against him ? was 
sufficiently co m pel l ing to cafl- for 
an answer by him. 

Whar was called “essential 4’ in 
Onraff was correctly described as 
sxh. That was a dear risk of 
.iffidstioe 'if the requirements of 
logic and fairness in that respect 
were not observed. 

. The court considered whether 
the judged omission.bad rendered 
the jury’s verdict unsafe and 
having reviewed- the evidence, 
indnBng new material received 
<m the appeal concluded tint the 
conviction was 1 unsafe and shouM 
be'quasbecL •• 

Solicitors: Ms Katie' Afcesten 
GPS. Nottingham, f • 



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Commissioners of Customs 
and Excise v Liverpool 
School of Per f or min g Arts 
Before Mr Justice Camwath 
(Judgment January 30] 

When a person who made taxable 
supplies and out of country sup¬ 
plies which would be taxable if 
made in the UK. wished to 
determine the attribution of input 
tax to those supplies under Part V 
of the Value Added Tax (General) 
Regulations (SI 19© No 886). the 
out of country supplies were to be 
treated as 'taxable supplies” 
within (he meaning of regulation 
30(2) even [hough under the Value 
Added Tax Act 1983, they were not 
taxable supplies as such. 

Mr Justice Camwath. sitting as 
an additional judge of die Queen's 
Bench Division, so hdd in a 
reserved judgment in dismissing 
an appeal by the Commissioners of 
Customs and Excise against a 
decision of a VAT tribunal on 
October 10. 1996 in respect of a 
ruling of the commissioners that 
certain supplies made by the 
taxpayer. Liverpool School Of 
Performing Arts were not to be 
treated as taxable supplies for the 
purpose of calculating the deduct¬ 
ible proportion of input tax. 

Mr Nicholas Raines. QC. for the 
commissioners; Mr Richard Bar- 
low. instructed by Panned Kerr 
Forster, accountants, for die 
taxpayer. 


MR JUSTICE CARNWATH 
said that Liverpool School erf 
Performing Arts commenced 
proriding educational services in 
September 1995. 

in February 1993, ir had entered 
into a sponsorship agreement with 

a German company m 1993 where¬ 
by it agreed to provide supplies of 


advertising and publicity. A large 
part of the agreed fee was paid 
before L1PA registered for VAT. 

Between March and May 1993 
. the only supplies made were out of 
country supplies to Germany. 
Between June 1993 and May 1995 
L1PA made both oat of country 
and taxable supplies but no ex¬ 
empt supplies. From June 1995, 
LJPA made taxable, oert of country 
and ex em pt supplies. 

The dispute concerned the cor¬ 
ner treatment of the input tax 
attributable to UFA'S overheads. 

His Lordship reviewed the rele¬ 
vant English legislation and set 
out regulations 30 and 32 of the 
1985 Regulations. 

The commissi oners bad con¬ 
tended that regulation 32 was a 
self-contained code dealing with 
out of country supplies, input tax 
attributable to such suppbes was 
ascertained by reference to die 
extent of use of the goods or 
services in question. Whatwas left 
was then subject to apportionment 
between taxable and exempt sup- 
plies in accordance with regulation 
3ft For that purpose it -was 
accepted that the reference to/"aH 
taxable supplies” m paragraph’ 
3Q(l)(d) had to be read as referral 
to taxable and exetnpr suppHes 
only, and not inctac&ig': 0 «fr of 
country supplies. 

The taxpayer hadcontended^that 
regulations 30 and 32 were to be 
read together as pans of a ringle 
code, the effect of regulation 32 
being amply to indicate howen* trf 
country supplies wweto be taken 
into account in carrying out'tne 
regulation 30 catadations. < 

lnpm^cmsaviastfaedforma 

of country supplies was, to me 
extent of such use. to.be dealt with- 
in the same way as input 9" 


taxable supplies under regulation 
30. 

Thus. in so far as suppiies were 
wholly in respect ol taxable or out 
of coontry supplies, foe whole of 
the input tax was treated as 
attributable- to taxable supplies 

under regulation 300(b). ^ ta so far 
as it was partly so used, an 
appo r tio n ment had to be made in 

accordance with value under 
regulation 30(2)(d). 

The tribunal had concluded that 
the taxpayer's construction was 
correct and had formed the dear 
view that out of country suppfie? 
which would have been treated as 
taxable supplies had they beat 
iwfcinthe UK were far all input 
tax purposes to be treated - as 
taxable supplies mad*? in the UK. 

If one confined oneself to the 
domestic legislation it would be 
difficult to conclude that the an¬ 
swer was as dear as the tribunal , 
bad suggested. Each rorszractioo 
contended for fay the parlies in- 
volved reading, the words of 
regulation 36 in. something other 
than their ordinary meanin g • 

. Rntixmon. each cotattucefon 
involved finding, a ; link between 
regulation 30 and 32 which was 
not in terms expressed fo Ste- 
ktosfatitm: . • - 

: However* i he statutory ref¬ 
erences which the tribunal- hajj 
made in hs decision fadoded- 
references to the relevant pro- 
viaons of the European- Sixth 
Directive (77/388/EEQ (Ctl vm 
L14S/1), on which the UK legisla¬ 
tion was based. It was dearly right 
to have regard fothe-Dircctiwraj 
an aid to construction, and-wfiere: 
possible to construe the- rcgufa. 
tteus in aotxadance . with ifa 
. scheme. His Loidship set out dte 

refevant ports of artides 17 and 19 


of tfye Directive. There'were dear 
Ittrallete .brtween die schemeTof 


' ' W.A. 4 

!“= <■ -J —-‘ »» 'fat 

‘ '*-■■■ W-vit' 

-•«— c tr*i 


musoprovisKmiand tfiesTOenfeof 
fftere^ulations. ^The scheme of tire 
Direcnre seemed to correspond 
more dowdy , so. the taxpayers 
niterpretstticm. - ' 

The- itormaL rate- anbodjaJ in 
artides 17{I> to (3) and 19 was that 
were 

frtiUmjQ j^orisefy the same^way 




'rrvm 


WWtfcMMftt- 


The fraction 

article 19 


for in 
transactions 


ZjZuZ. ™swtwns 

wider both unden^arela.- and 

ffius; mUnned Kingdom tenmmrf- 

QCV.aichvMfiMhiwukL._■!■ 


mauded txKh taxable su 
and out of axmuy stq^ifes. 

Tfr°s, txw would normally eat- 
peatofed the standard rub* as 
“ regoiation 30 of. the 
EaalUk'jTOBhgon. treating tax- 
^an.rfSrnny... 
auppbra o h the same bads for tfe ' 
pffpo ir ; f the fractipTv and that. ■ 

** *S5* - 

to ensure that (te 1 

ot.country supplies wba. - • 


J "£•' 


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testifv 


THE TIME*! TUESDAY FEBRUARY 101998 


SPORT 45 


1 RACING: FORMIDABLE RAIDING PARTY BEING ASSEMBLED TO CHALLENGE FOR FESTIVAL PRIZES 


* 



TEN years ago. as the Irish 
might have put it themselves, 
t he sit uation had become des¬ 
perate—but not serious. They 
stfll recognised in the Chelten¬ 
ham Festival a compulsory 
tesr of endurance for liver and 
wallet- Those three mad 
March days still owed much 
to their dauntless pilgrimage. 
The trouble was that tbeir 
contribution was no longer 
being rewarded. 

In 1987, ten years after 
returning with a record seven 
winners, they managed just 
one. The same was true the 
following year, and then in 
1989 things reached rode bot¬ 
tom with a whitewash. There 
were a bare couple to follow, 
and — if they celebrated 
bravely — it remained very 
much; a wake. How sweet, 
then, is this new awakening. 

During those dark days, the 
Irish could not afford to keep 
their mast promising young 
horses; “silly money" was 
being offered by the patrons of 
fashionable Lamboum yards. 
Since the turn of die decade, 
however, they can seemingly 
afford to be ally themselves. 

They turned the-comer in 
1993, with half a dozen win¬ 
ners; two years ago, they 
matched the record of 1977. 
Last year, they rather trod 
water with' three. This time, 
however, there is unprece¬ 
dented strength Jn depth. - 

Auspiciously, ifae Festival 
opens on March 17. St Pat¬ 
rick’s Day. Even with, the 
handicaps as yet unframed, a 
strong case can be made for 
backing a record with Coral. 
Eight winners is quoted at 
14-1, with 25-1 against nine. 


. JBvChws McGrath 

and -40-1 against tat The 
turning of the tide is vividly 
danonstrated by die same 
price being available against a 
whitewash: five winners is 
favoured at 4-1. 

The betting ring's heavy 
artillery will be trained on the 
first race of the meeting/the 
' Citroen / Supreme Novices’ 
Hunlle. His Song is being 
viewed as a banker after 
rattling Istabraq in The Irish 
Champion Hurdle. . though 
'Native Estates'hxdted a soud 
alternative at Leopardstown 
on Sunday. 

Istabraq himself lived up to 


RICHARD EVANS 


Nap; Forever Noble 
^jgAQCariisle) 

''' ■'Tgbod rennet 

“ ‘ 

y. last 



NR 
: (Z50 Warwick) 


banker status as a novice last 
season, and now strives to do 
so again in the Sznurfit Cham¬ 
pion Hurdle itself. Also on the 
opening card, HID Society is 
among the fences for the 
Guinness Arkle Trophy, while 
Papillon's successful recon¬ 
naissance last month gave a 
due to the Irish potential in 
the seven Festival handicaps. 

Success in the opening ex¬ 
changes, however, would 
serve principally to ensure 
that Cotswold pubs echo with 
even bolder talk about tile 
horse already prompting bra¬ 


zen comparisons with the in- ' 
comparable Arkle. William 
Hill offers a risible 54 against 
Florida FtearL winning the 
Royal SunAUiance Chase cm 
tiie Wednesday, though he 
must travel half a mile further 
titan when fending off Boss 
Doyle on Sunday/ 

. -Florida Pfcari won the 
Champion Bumper last year, 
and the Irish are confident of 
preserving their domination of 
this event Willie Mullins, 
indeed, is seeking a third 
consecutive success wife Hotel 
Tuskar. a 15-length winner at 
Fkirybouse last month. Ano¬ 
ther who has already flour¬ 
ished up the Cheltenham hill 
is Klairon Davis, who at¬ 
tempts to retrieve the Queen 
Mother Champion Chase, 
while the four-mile National 
Hunt Chase has always at¬ 
tracted a strong challenge. 

Elegant Lord, who also Um¬ 
bered up impressively on Sure 
day, has already outclassed 
one field for the Christies 
Foxhunter Chase, while the 
third day also sees numerous 
battle-hardened contenders 
for the Elite Club Triumph 
Hurdle. Then there is Dorans 
Pride in the Tote Cheltenham 
Gold Cup. 

The sponsor yesterday dan¬ 
gled a carrot of 100-1 against 
the Irish winning all three 
championship events, with in¬ 
dividual “team" quotes of 9-4 
in the Champion Hurdle 
{Ladbrokes offers just 2-1 
against Istabraq on his own); 
9-2 in the Champion Chase; 
and 9-2 in the Gold Cup. As 
Rob Hartnett, its spokesman, 
said: "This year, nothing 
seems impossible." 



Adwcat 


Tibetan 


Ca iUtoBf j gaota 
Mabrewafl 



VFOM 


im 




R9I 



Florida Pearl is one of the leading lights of a powerful Irish team for Cheltenham 


wrm ibe detection of Relkael. Shadow Leader and 
Marello at yesterday's five-day acceptance stage, 
the weights for Saturday's Tote Gold Trophy at 
Newbury have risen by 211b. The Irish are mounting 
a strong challenge to win die £ 100 . 000 -added race 
for the first time since Insh Fashion in 1976. with 
%r )X- five of the 18 possible runners. 

Graphic Equaliser was most Impressive in winning 
the Ladbroke Hurdle at Leopardstown last month, 
and has to be respected with Just a 41b penalty. 
There is a good chance that he has improved since 
Joining Arthur Moore, but he win haw to overcome 
totally different conditions rf he Is to relieve the 
bookmakers of more sponsorship money. 

Ccmmanche Court was ante-post favourite for the 
Ladbroke. but was withdrawn after failing to sparkle 
on the home gallops. A best-priced s-J. he wilt go 
well if in the same heart as when winning at 
Leopardstown in December. 

Given the forecast of a dry week, best of the 
hometramed runners may be Cariito Bn game and 

E Nahrawah, who were unsulted by the soft ground 

: sf-JitijiJa when third and seventh behind Shahrur in the 
ttempton last month. 

earlier finished second to Major 
contest at Sandown, and makes 
strong appeal at 25-1 with the Tore, who are 
offering a non-runner, no bet concession. 

However, preference Is for Cariito Brigante. His 
trainer. Paul Webber, said yesterday; "He's In good 
form and a drying week will suit him welL The 
weights going up is good news for Robert Thornton, 
who lakes the ride." Winner of the Imperial Cup last 
season. CARt/TO BRIGAN7E should be backed at 
16-1 now that he has returned to form. 



THUNDERER 


1.50 AJhosaam . 

2£0 Soprema Lady 

2.50 Sunsutn Gotda 

Carl Evans: 420 Earthmover. 


3.20 Nazza/o 

&50 Cheerful Aspect 

4.20 The Malakarma 
4.50 Knlghtsbridge Brad 


GOING: GOOD 


TOTE JACKPOT MEETING 


SIS 


1.50 BYTONJUVBfflE NOVICES HWflftf 

(4-Y-Q: £2,828:2m) <22 rums) 


3213 HUMOE LAO 43 (D.8) (P' 
21 TCM3RAL 11 p) JB €mt 

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104 

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116 

117 

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1MRHIZMJ1AM ID-12 6 Why fll-4t») I B*Snfl16« 

lObride Lad 131 3rd (9 5 to Ra ta a i di in grade 1 tirafe at 
Chepstow (2m 11<M. hesvyV Temtrjd best Faurdroed 241 In 
noma hurtle to Folfcastons (2m 11 nQyrJ. good to sift) Ungrate 
& I tortte at Smto*m (2m 110yd. soft. Time Pro}*** 371 Sm to 
i Ctetentam f2m H good) wift Itopta lift. 

useM on fe H4 and corfd knprow slgnScartly 


10-12_BayLjros 

10-12-- Pfbfer 

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Altaare 



3S5lhol 8 to French I 
Sound Appeal in once 
ALHOSAAM 


2.20 MMUFACnURDIS INDUSTRIES NOVICES CHASE 

(£3.631: 2m 4f 110yd) f!3 rannere) 


701 

ro 

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20« 

355 

206 

357 

208 

209 

21D 

217 

212 

713 


2P5W1 A5X 7?£ WIS H 
111-01F sn OWIE 11 PJ 
t i«.T2 sjPBaewrso 
I2MW CM YOU JUST 78 
170-742 COOL 15 

1P5T DSJGHT 678 — 

QMS R0RLESS 


.. U Pipe 7-11-8 - A P MeCcy 110 

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B£TtB«- 3-1 Ask n» Bate. 4-1 Sir D*«. Sapn*MUb(. 7-1 Sfep Ejrc. Cod GtfPW, IM oTtara. 

«gr. CMOAMN 7-f t-9 J R Kaanijh <W 1w} A Hantear Ifl m 

Ask The BWIerbeaf Jeftrts Hll h norlce chase * lAasieran 
4f HOvd nood) Sr Dante W1 to nwire dase d Foftednne (2m 

_ 5j goal); (Kgvnasfy beto Vfbo Am I beaten a disiance to oovtee 

amC j ^w«ira»> Om qood) ^mwiw Lwhf oodi 2nd to Wlstoy Wonder innonce chased 
cSaK sobrcoof^&nr Oilaad to Swm Darnew to redee ctoe*WMsor 

Step Do Eyre 2« 3n» to Chead Oe Guene « imta chase at Wanrid {2m AI Ifflyd. heavy). 
arm kv * Da sal to tsanshr ladul iurBes ham to chasing 


2.50 


m NATWUAL W1NT NOVICES WHOLE 

(QtriiHer £3.791: 2m 4f 110yd) (24 runners) 

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107 




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303 

304 

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303 

309 

310 

311 
212 

313 

314 

315 

316 

317 

318 
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320 
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54 00 ^ la^Wa- IM ^ a ** B ^ 14 ‘ 1 

I uiw tuM CJow Hammy H to 14-nawet nwklai lude 

“a^'bS a? US 'ist 

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reves hstfe a a 1 ’?T b9a 

tact a taffifl 4SW ffltoll ig; Ol 17 to Heal fed m.nmrro Hadea WtootoR 

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101 11S143 GOOD TICS 13 (BF.F,£LS) (MtD RoWrann) BH4112-0-BWest(7) 88 


Rswcart rurfcer. Sh-lon tom {F—ML P— nn< Bf —team lawatto In Hast race). 
Pj - ^ ri lWet ;, mtoeedto 

ten tad 6—flood. S —si, 9 ®d to son, 

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3.20 ffORCS C 0 ^ CHALLBIff CIB* HAWNCAP CHASE 

(£5.998:3m 5f) (9 rums) 

320001 A N C EXPRSSS 24 (CtXS] (H ftrari J King 10-11-10_A P McCoy II 

34MP0 SGOORn6A17ff.&S) SlMdl)SUeler9-11-0-C Weft (3) 1 

3F-F2P6 RAI0FOATS24(BtoXS)(MBated)MnHKnight 12-11-6 MAFtejertd II 

WJ2234 AWREIWAL28(FAS) (MbC# iflN)KBefc»0-11-5-*?•"“" J 

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442-49* ALLO GEOHEE24 (tS) (IresSp«T6) A Howcnnl* 12-10-8 AIWMbd II 

4-41292 KARAR IS ffA) (Mr* U Sampson) H (taw 8-10-7.... AG*n*y (7) 1! 

73S23P6 (A? SO HAIWY 19 (F,Q.S) [Mi R Sm») R Cud 10-1S-3 -J Lncn II 

8ETTWS: 2-1A « C E*res. 5-1FH Of Ctm. tma. 7-1 Man. Ann Uai. 10-1 Breto M. IM <*« 

■ 1997) VUSnWIEAStnB 11-JI-JO A kftflufe (M) D Wdnhen 7 an 


A N C Express Deal MarteJI Boy berJen a Astana to IB-rum 

.Im 51. hewyt toth Fito 01 Oats {130> 

441 Mi uM3 to 



Up to handicap eh m to Wtowfcfc i 
handicap chase to Worcester (2m T 
& Whdsor (Sn M TfOytJ, good). 

LliUch 0m, good to »8). 

NAZZAR0 is vary eeB handicapped tsn his best term 


3.50 BBN6TWI HANDICAP HURDLE (£3,857: 2m 41 llOytf) (8 nnrn) 

501 122-2 CrtHHfl. AS’STf 14 (5) (Lady PVtanotar) T Foratef 5-77-73 NMnini SB 

502 -3F112F HAIttBl* CHORUS 19 PS) (WaMi Lid) Mo J PLb dy 27 

503 334W1 ANNA SOLBL 19 (D/A (M ft QuMon) 0 ^anrool 5-1M . M RUMdl 130 

504 H-1222 CASSa^S BOV iOwfDASI IlycnsJWI Radog) 6 IfeCool 7-lO-B D J SfcdM 127 

505 PI30-64 BOWCtm COURT 59 (BF.S) (A Sponcn] J Mount 6-10-4 C UP Wt |B ttB 

SOB 1-03215 BRECOH 22 (B^l (four WUb ratMttM W Mute 5-1 CM . A? McCoy 129 

507 7UB3B- S7BP WHO 283 (D,9 ff Morgm) CMcricrt HM JR J18 

SB 4-55332 WA0ADA 11 (P/4 R 0 Bath* 7-10-1 .... D J teiitf 120 
BETTM6: MCteerM Aspect 4-1 Area Safe*. S-1 Hartoyto Cftw Cassfc's 8-1 3e« fori. 10-1 (toxft. 

1987: REAfiANESOLC 5-1D-11 B FtPwl |B4) PUupfe 6 W 

3 Cheerful Aspect neck 2nd ol 7 to Beecffleto Flyer «i hendkap 
hudte to ufester (2m 41110yd, soft). Harter** Chorus tell m 
rwite dase to LuDo* (2m 41, flood to soU), previously 1112nd of 
'' 1). Anna SoW beat 

2012nd ol 3 to 
i). Bowdfi Court beaten a 
)}0p),st4l) Brecon beaten a 
in of 110 yd. good to soB): 
2M1IM jot). Steve Fort 






Balding loses 

TOBY BALDING yesterday 
lost his appeal against a 
El 000 fine imposed over the 
running of Jimmy’s Cross, 
vvho finished second at Win- 
canton last month. A Jockey 
Club disciplinary committee 
hearing confirmed the stew- 
juds- view that the horse was 
schooled in publlc- 


9 to Music Therapy in norta dose a Hutongdon (2m 4f ill 
Stem 3#» to 5-rnrer handicap hwife to Taunton {2m H ' 

MatoTs Law to terxSop hurde el Lewster (2m 4t lir 
d(St90 4thol5ieHmyLtBsinlandKapl>a(dtoa: . 
instance 5ft of 8 to QnWatpay m henoe^i hurdle to Fontwfl 
(Rnously beto Ooctoor Kl to 4-runner handicap hunfle to Fonlwfl 
be« aneran 31 to 5-nnner tandieap hidle to Uttuw (2m M 110yd. good). Wadada 312nd ol 
7 to Province to toreScap hurdle to FoBerione (2m V UDyd good to sod) 

CHEBtfU L ASPECT can be made to look wefl tretoed on hb Ltoceaa tain 

4.20 AH WBHNNG TROPHY HUNTERS CHASE 

(Amateurs: £1,087: 3m 21) (5 nmners) 

6th PZBSJf- t3tAMt»roW2SSmFMIMR«aoeltoJMctow^ 

602 111114 EAflTWMB W (R Pmy) R Btow 7-124 — Mb P ta*y 0 

683 /SIPM HOLHC HOUSE 34P P&S) IE *ofH) ? dsns 12-134 _ C Mob 

604 312304 RUSTY BROGE 84PJW&S) {1 tomato .Me S totem 11-124 R ftMS 

SIS «3a?l- UeiMWKARMAZSaatFA^ffOrey)SirsCBMyIMM BPrfct*. 

BETTM& 9-4 Ertwow. 5-2 Hoiaad rtns*. 7-J It* IkUonm. 4-1 Ramd Fori 10-1 ftsfir Bddfl* 

1997: TW IIAlAKAfBiA 11-12-8 M B Potodi (4-6 tei) Mia C Sandn 4 m 

Diamond Fort bear Spedai Account HI to 12-rUHKf ftanScap 
dare to Shadoid (3m 4f. good n firm). Eanhnover beat Storo- 

_ flies Qoty 41 in Murm fuller ctase to Stratford (3m M. ooodj. 

7th dll to Ceftc Abbey to horttr chan to Stradoid (in to. good to finro. The 
bed (tailing Cupid 71 m 7-rentw lute dasa to UOneler (4m a. good effli Rusty 
Bridge (levels) 241 3d and Hotand House (26) belter off) ML 

EAR THMOVER is ore ol fee be3 hates arotrd and can hold Upland House 

4.50 FEBRUARY MARES ONLY MAIDEN NATIONAL HUNT FLAT RACE 

(£1,445: 2m) (22 runners) 

a Nfflennw 27 (E Sewn N Hmtersao 5-114- T fogpr Q 

CWW PE (D Bta) D (ichofajD 6-114- R «**S»r gt 

00 GRACSU. DOLLY 12 (HyOo - Ms) A strata 5-114 . I Curarte (5) 

00 JOKAMf T9 (7 Ewjf n «4o^n 5-114 ... _. * Q 

LLY FDR LOOKS (Pd Md ParrtK) I WCWns 5-114 - E festal) (3) 

4 MaODY PRMCSS 35 ff Ctarte) 0 Dfeto 5-114 ... H Ohtr 0 

05 HV DAWN 27 (A Fbu) C Horiotto 5-114 -— - D J Kawatfi @ 

0 ATT DfSWMM 1? (J*3 H ftafcflbf C 5-tl4 ... U NMR (7) 

Msn-UME (C T HamngsA; J ZM-vmh i were s-n-e t^DemAi 
ax Ksmens ms j vam kb v wawnn 4-114 . _ s Kdy pi 

5 SPNffUNG DOVE 83 (C Piter) C J Pnc* 5-114-O tame fi) 

0- TAraOETTE 368 (P Wegnm) ? thrpom 6-114 Mbs iJtae m 
0 T AND 0W41S 27 (Caw Vecchfo) R Ctrtto 6-114 J Pv«»« 0 

4 MEADS 64 |C Mated) C Motor* 5-1'4 _ -- 0 

0 TUDOR M30XA 13 <P Pvtfi P Pudy M14--•— .Cm 0 

DORANS BSWE JMh J CrratoSfeuO <1 Ate 4-1M2 5opha WM g) 

0 00U&E RSI 38 p Sreenj W G M Tuner 4-10-12- J*™" 0 

D IW9WL LAW 2? ftta y cranai) 0 0 W* 4-10-12 x Mam P) 
KMGHTSSnOS BRB) (OVtoiatta BC) I Wftams A-10-12 - Jtate 

USS PMX (Us P Sty) Iks P 5fy 4-MM2 — — - * 0 0 

■ PUP'S PET (F Mffl taB) J WBm 4-1M2---_*.?*« 5? 

SALLY UBflHNJT (t*s B Padta) P Mar 4-1B-12 - P fe«*y (3) 

BETTliaK Owy Pk M Arierihv.lM Uy OM.SWteanufc. Doans 6«w. 12-1 J«»sm Somotog 
flow. M. Doubts first, 2D>1 often. 

1997: ERMTANIE 4-11-0 MrT Dooiw (6-4 ter) F Douoai (ft) 22 bi 

».Ar«nliny WM4 l2toLucy Waltois to mares IjHtt race to 
ftfastme (2m ll 11M. good to soft) toft My tom fteeb) 
_„ 7K) 5S? aad T AndSwge tods) beater a 

BraseM Doly 31115ft of ? to fWteepff In ffl W oce a joodto 

soft). Jaanm 451 Oft of« to M aenETiHH «<w a Luttw^n. 

Prteess 2114ft of 12 to CH Met Laid In NH U race at Ludlow (2m. soflj mft Gnc^My 
newlsl 3S m Siy Oesp^ 18 9ft of 18 to liiri of Tfe ftes to NH flto rare elDmraaer On 
110yd, mod). Spoaiww SI 5ft to IS to Ulto SWiess in nares VH M race to Hereford Cm 
It. modTiRniB 6V514ft ol 18 to Bay Bex m NH tu tat* al Uifto* (2m. god) taftto ftsl 
bfatan a dUon Tfli if B to Hra Fate to nh to at* a Wu«s»McH_gn. y»d to aS) 
Empertol Lady 2417ft to Comnandie Han n nWttoC NH W iaa ai Fonteefl (an 21. good to soil) 

KMSHI5B8HX3E WED is tom a stale eatable ol gedmg (ten nadir first Sue 



COURSE SPECIALISTS 


TRAINERS 

T Carey 

j r 

0 _ 

M Pipe 
Us J Ptorec 
.0 Mtafton 


me 

An 

« 

JOCKEYS 

WflOfC 

BMb 

% 

4 

6 

13 

22 

308 

273 

AP McCoy 

R Omoiay 

17 

21 

42 

53 

405 
3 tS 

10 

39 

£6 

N Vflfltasan 

16 

73 

313 

2S 

109 

739 

T Maptfii 

4 

19 

211 

15 

60 

22.1 

G Tmney 

4 

22 

182 

19 

97 

116 

J Kwnagh 

9 

57 

158 


YESTERDAY'S 

RESULTS 


Fontwell Park 

Going: good (good to flnn In ptacasi 
150 (2m 6t 110yd htte) 1. Flay River (J 
Ryan. 8-1). 2. Mhgus (33-1>: 3. Gay 
Ruffian (16-1); *. Maryjo (20-1». Fatotdon 
5-1 lav. 18 ran ml. « K Wlr«rove. Tola 
£9 20, £2.00. £9 40. £7.90. £550. DF: 
£31220 Tno: no! won (pool ol £592.13 
carried forward to 250 Warwic*. today) 
CSF. £19344 Tncasl: £2.853 25. 

220 (2m 2t chi 1. Dear Do (M A 
FegareU, 5-f); 2. High Learie (7-1). 3. 
WlnspV (7-1) StemRrm7-4lav II ran. II, 
4i N Henderson Tote• C4.30: £1.70. 
£1.B0,S1.Ba DF: £7.60. Trio' £11.90. CSF: 
C424& Tricast £279.56. 

2J0 tan 2 f 1 10yd tidte) 1 Rad Curate (D 
Bndswaler. 9-4 (I Lawj. 2. r«teHve Bayw 
(9-4 y-tev): 3. Huricane Jena 110-1) 16 
ran. 101. G G McCoun Tore. £ 280 ; £200. 
El 30. £2.40. DPE430 Trio' £1050. CSF 
E622 

3^0 (3m 2» 110yd ch) 1. BBotwnbcup fR 
Dunwoodv. 1-3 lav): 2. Dancerteyoudrop 
(7-1); 3. OSum's Secret (7-1). 5 ran. Dtai. 
tfisL M Roberts. Tore El 30. El 10, El .BO 
DF £270. CSF' £3.21. 

350 (2m 21 110yd Me) 1. Caracol (T 
Dascombs. 7-1f. Z. Como On Ftonny (14- 
1). 3. Beyond Our Reach (14-1) Royal 
Action 9*2 lav. IS ran r*. 3. J hwSa 
Tote. E7 40. £230. £4.00, £4.30. DP- 
£87.10. Trio: £27860. CSF: £9924. 
Tricaa: £1265.00. 

420 (3m 21110yd ch) l.Luv4>FrankWP 
McCcy, I3-B k-tBYl 2. Rhoman Fun 
(12-1): 3. Benbinn (16-1) Ragman im 
)H av. 10 ran. NR: MMan Rest 31. II. M 
Pipe. To«: £230; £1.50. £250. £420. DF: 
£13 40. Trio: £44.50. CSF: £18.57. Tncast 
£219.10. 


■a (7-11. 16 
DHtdnf Tote: £4 70: £1 60. £150. £360 
DF- £14 70 Tno- £39.10. CSF' £21.95. 
Jackpot £2357.10. 

Placepot £134.90. Quadpot £17.10 

Newcastle 

Going: good (good to soft in places) 

270 On llDyd eft) 1. Eddwete Du 
Moulin (P Cartwny, 2-11 lav). 2 Oui By 
NWd 125-1). 3, Fiwp Saeftie (13-2). 10 
ran. ill 2fel G Rtcbwds. Tow C12G. 
£1.70. £210. E110 DF. £12 BO. Trio; 
£2930 CSF £11.00. 

240 fan betel T. Mrthraic (R McGratb. 
5-1). 2 Klercftem (16-11. 3. Knayton 
Knight (0-11. Tnenmum7-2tav. 14 ran NR- 
FchtSig Tones 81. 31. W Cunnintfram. 
Tote' 0.40: £2M. 0.30. £2.60. DF. 
£43 80. Tito: El 5430 CSF' E66 76. 
Trtoast £500.67. 

3.10 (3m ch) 1. Ask Me Later (Mr M 
Bractune, 15-8 fev; Richard Evens's 
nap): 2 Brighter Shade (9-2). 3. Flea! 
Tcrtc (5-1). It nan II. ifcL Mrs S 
Bradbwne. Tote: £240: £130. £ 220 . 
£2.10. OF: £7 SO. Trio. £15 60 CSF: 
£1118. Tricar* £37 73. 

3.40 (3m ch) 1. Maybe O’Grady (N Smith. 
2-1 )Hav); 2 Kir#aw (2-1 Jr-fev): 3. Up For 
Ransome (9-4). 7 ran 3». 1L W 
Cunningham True £3.00: El 40. £1 60 
DF £230 CSF- £6.70. 

4.10 £2m 41 hefle) 1. Over The Beck (E 
Callaghan. 7-2 lav): 2. DenticUaia (50-1): 
3. Ncrtfwm Mono (6-1): 4. Jumbo 9ar 
(33-1) 17 ran. NR Menshaar. i W. 15*1. J 
Jeltersen. Tote’ £390. £130, £5.70, 
£220. £11.80 DF-£150.80. Trio: £208 40. 
CSF £186 78 Tncasl £1,006.56 

4.40 Cm hefe) 1. BaBad Minstrel (P 
Cerbeny, 2-1); 2. fteieVi (4-1); 3. wynyarri 
Krtttv (5-4 lev] 17 ran Nk. 11 J 
FioSerakl Tow: £3.40 (3 30. £2 ID. 
E1.10.DF:£5.70.Tno:E29Q.CSF £1032 
Placapoe £38.50. Ouadpot £7.00. 

Southwell 

Gong: standard 


£1 £0. D.BO. Q.10-" bF: £7 50. Trio- 
£44.40. CSF: £1728. Tncast- £183.42 
200 (im 3fi 1. Read (G DuffieW, 4-1 p- 
fev), 2 Double Echo (4-1 #4wl; 3. 
Emboa Boy (4-1 jr-lav) Oran. W. 2L **e 
A Swtobank. To»- £4® £180. £1.50. 
£1 80. DF. £5 60 Trio- £8 60. CSF. £1920 
Tncast £6357 

230(71) 1, Uve Project IS Whfrnorth, 4-1 
tav): 2. Chaertul Groom (9-21. 3. Gwrie 
John(7-1). 11 ran.Nk tel HOapgETae 
£3.40. Cl 40. £1.70, £230 OP £10». 
Trio. £2430. CSF: E20.35 Tricast 
£104.46. 

200 dm) t. Sttoritelne (D Holland. S-2 
fav): 2. First Mils iio-l). 3. Chaimww 
Chofc* (5-1). 11 «n- NR Ajp** HUe- 
awsy. 3 . hd. M John^n. Totr £320. 
E2.00. £3.80. £100. DF- £1530 Trio: 
£15.50 CSF £29.91. Trteast £11757. 
3J30 (61) 1. AdrenaBn (J Gotobod.7-11:2. 
Stravsas /evens taV); 3. Famdon ftwcdss 
(2-1). 7 tan. W. mi T Ctemart. Tore- 
€2M £140 DF £8.90. CSF: 

E15JJ0 

4DO (Bfl T. BoW Aristocrat (F Ljredi. 
13-2); Z Ktyaa Max (12-1); 3. Eton Ud- 

K (5-4 lav). 10 ran. W. 3. R Hotfinshead. 

a: £7 40- £220, £1 GO. £1.10 DF- 
£8120. Tno: £4820. CSF- E7S54. 

4 J30 (2ml 1, Wng Of Sparta (Mr G Ba«w. 
3-1): 2 Tire Can Tell (8-1); 3. Notation 

e t) Undo Doug 5-2 fav. 9 raa frm The 
al McCoy S. U 0 Sherwood. Tote. 
£4 S3 £1.10. £3 50. £t DO. OF- £9 .70 Trio 
£15.00. CSF £27 DO. Tflcsst: £1 to.W 
Ptacepot: £9DO. Quar^ot £320. 




THUNDERER 

1.40 Ganpafi. 2.10 Swan bister. 2.40 Spirit Of Steel. 
3.10 Marble Men. 3.40 Cherry Dee. 4.10 HighbeaJti. 

4.40 Young Thruster. 

Timekeeper's top rating: 3.10 STORMY CORAL 


GOING GOOD TO SOFT 


SIS 


1.40 HOECHST ROUSSEL PANACUR EBF MARES 
N H NOVICES HURDLE (E2.619 2m 41110yd) (18 runners) 

1 All 6AM>AT1 72 (D.S1 N TmOMkma 7-11-12 . . C Mwdt BS 

2 00-f ALlHteECKK J Cottfog 8-10-12 . . . . -. JScppte 

3 5a>WOOkHOOS£S3Beowfe«MO-i: C UcCmttoc* (5J 

4 0 CHANTILLY ROSE 80 R Brrvtt 6-10-12 - . . ASSnift 

5 W ROSS THE BOSS 57 Mr J 8ro» 5-10-12-BSkmy 

6 0-PGRACELAND73F Mipht S-tO-1 - .UFoas 

7P334 HURST R.YBI 25 (BFTl f te*Bflh 6-KM2 - A Dot**! 

B43EJOWD0W 42 testifinTBan 5-10-12__ D Patau 

9 4 KFRKSDALE 62 Ptetanort 6-10-1?.R 5tnpk 

10 LADVHAUGHRJolfBOOi-IO-i; .. KJOteon 

It 22-4 UPWLOUSE25Ate MBwdey5-10-1? - .... P»er 
12 50-MADGEMCSPIASH493JJetem6-HM; . ECaBqtan - 

15 0 MEMFHS 6UC5 B! (BO S KeUevtll 6-10-1? 

Mr C Bora (3) 

14 3W UEUSAH9 CKSTBU SB (Cj S Goteqs MO-I? 

MrSDua&P) 

J5 KEF MSS 8/WTHOLWCW18 U Harmcn) 8-10-12 . 8 Gmty - 

16 41)4 DUCK MARCH 40 EWeymes 510-12-N Hnmrt* p) TO 

J72f¥M SECOND RODLF 11 0 ftavan 8-10-12.Nflrew 96 

18 W4> SH MORE CASTLES IT G A Harts 7-10-1? _ .BHatirfl 

9-< Gvpx. T-2 tiooy lauBa S-1 temaiOtt Otattem. 8-1 JMVMy. Seajnd 
PlWr. 10-1 lira Flyer. 12-1 UMp «t5ateh. 14-1 omen. 


2.10 TOTE NOVICES CHASE 

(Qualifier. £4.075. 3m) (13) 

13331 FSL&UKE GOLD 10 (S> G Rtdarte 10 - 11 -3 . A DoMxn FDB 

7 -POT CRAS«AaOO 5 P CJnsatrouafi 7-ld-iO _ _ ASSnMi 

34466 BWKSTRET11 0 Broran HMB-10 ... . MBrewn » 

4 PP-P FARMERS SUBSOY 40 G M Mom 6-10-10 . ... N Betty - 

5 *04 FBftiK RAMBLER 10 R Jotasrn 7-10-10 KJotas® - 

6/2-4 SRATE Dffl. B7 ff)P Btatart 8-10-10 -- E Cafctfrai 

7 OOaHaWVOOOOWBfeTStomtarf 6-10-10 mCBonraP) 

8 2PP- LBTWM COTTAfiE 331P B Spur 7-16-10 _ W Stems 

9 -OOP SANTA JET 40 fl>5) 6 M Mom* 7-10-ID . JCatetfan ~ 

104S3P SfffBl 4 f Uuragft 6-flMfl..-J&4X* 97 

11 IM SWAMBSTHt 5 PT.S) 11»9> 6-lHO.R Siflte - 

12 MB THE CROOkHI OAK 46 k Teeta-Owte 510-10 CUtorit 78 

13 -3P4 FL0WS1 OF OUBLAME 18 (BJ»Tl Vn 0 Tharawi 7-10-5 

0 Pater 00 

6- 4 Path Lie Gold. 7-4 Smadtaa. 7-111* CmAad Ote. 10-1 Bonra Start 15- 
1 Grac bed. 16-1 Sotga. 20-1 fetoe Reifikr. 55-1 Odm 

2.40 POLYFLOR NOVICES HURDLE 

(£2.528- 2m 41110yd) (IB) 

10F13 BOURBON DYNASTY 18 ffifS) 6 fetads 511-10 A Dgbbm 112 
2 PI U EASBY JOKSt 17 (OTAS) S KriUtMl 10-11-10 

UrCBomrp) 107 

3-U13NOBlENORMAN40(0,6)ktaURneley7-11-10 . Gin 100 
41-4P BROTHER OFHS34(G) Mrs VRndey 5-11-4 PHtwn 

5 PO CICE10NE 34 lifesLftBsdl 8-11-4 ... T Reed 

6 P BSPOL KflNG£ 17 G OUruto 5-11-4-PMUcftyp) 

7 3 FA« FARM LAD 17 JJdknoB 6-11-4 .. ..ECatedW 

62-62 FOREVER ND0L£ 45M Hanrenfl 511-4 -RGanHy 

9 4-FWTIRE’STRADER42UHamrayS5-11-4 - DBretey 
100000 KHAN WCER0Y 34 J Time 511-4 _ RSippte 

11 2- LOOKS LBI TTOLBlf 373PK Owics 6-11-4 MrSDa»* (S) - 

12 OPWWMBfWSSItatWtemwifrlM.ABetomy - 

13 2M NATURAL lALBCtOBCPtete 6-11-4 ..DPatar 

14 04E SRRIT OF ST®. TZ (5 T INe 5-fM-JCkbflfei 76 

15 62-3 TIC VMtRQR 52 GMIkne 7-11-4..NBsteey 

16 MO KAMLTON PRNCESS j A Hagg 6-18-13-U Fatter 

17 502 HADBK 14 C (tan 4-10-7-Jlta0«p} 115 

18 FOSTRATtaN GOLD 18 tejUfterehy 4-10-7-A Soft 

7- 3 EBbr Jota. 4-1 Barton Drreflv 6-1 Ftrtva Noble. 8-1 Haul. 10-1 
Satei 0( tee. rime Warier. 12-1 ottws 


03 


3.10 UNGMQOR HANDICAP CHASE (£3.388:2m) (6) 

1 im FABFBCATOR16 (D.S) P Fm (fee) 12-12-0 .. k HVtnrtl (7) 

.295 (CC ' 


2 135- STORMY CORAL i5S (C0/£5) C FWtor S-Il-6 . B 52arsy 
33415 MARBLE MAN 25 (CDE.S) M Peft 6-10-12 0 Banter 120 

4 -F35 BHOSSZI BAY 73 ff J5) Mrs M Rndar 10-10-7 PNraw - 

5 IFF RAIIWG MRAOE 50 (8 DEI G tart 8-1M Mi S Dmdr (SI 

6 FM- NORTHPRDE 283 (Off)UBeats 13-10-0 ..STaytarp) 87 
2-1 ttenif Mar. 9-4 Sarniy Coni. 5-2 fltassii Bar T-1 FaBncata 8-1 Ramng 
Ihde 33-1 Norm Pride 

3.40 NETHBS6UI CONDITIONAL JOCKEYS 

HANDICAP HURDLE (£2.290: 3m 110yd) (IQ) 

12332 LH&ATHBI24 (DT.G^) Mra M ftwtey 8-12-0 . G Lu 125 
:0SF1 H.1Y 18 (W/.S) A Sreae B-H-IO . ... -S Taylor 120 

32251 RVE FLAGS 45 (F.6.S) tte S Smtt 10-11-9 R Wfflanstm in 
41411 MRE STAN 10 |CD,G^)L Lugo 7-11-7 WOowtaflOi ffg 
5 S3F NORfifiW SQURE 24 B.CD.S) J Jettosw 10-11-6 E Ctagtat 
G lM CHEM1V DEE 82 ffAS) P EaunH 7-11-0 BGrrtan 119 

7 03-5 MASTER OFTWIW* 14 (WW5l J Mata 9-10-13 

CMcCtnrart 123 

8P33010B77 (F£)GRidanb 510-12 . ..0 Haring 125 

9 (040 DOCKMASTBi 24 fDJLS) ten K UlSgn )-lO-H NHnmuta H9 

106P62 WHAT JM1NAMI5 7 J J ONeJI 5-10-0.PMcGraft 109 

7-2 trne Star. S-1 fiwft*. 6-1 UiMtai Ou*/r Lira 7-1 T», 8-1 7tey 10-1 
Nowam Sryat- twAnraw. W* Am Want. IM Maoa 011r* flack. 


4.10 JAMES HALSTEAD HANDICAP CHASE 

(£3.189: 2m4( llflytf) (II) 


1P11F CHPPED OUT 17 |6^)U Todmrtn 8-12-0 
21250 HGHBEATMII (0J5I MraM Rarelfy 7-11-9 
3-UPP KALAJ017 (DE5) L timgo 8-U-J - - - 
41-24 MWAY138 (CE.G51 M Bane 8-11-0 . .. 
5122f ETHWAL OTY R (BFE^l G fBeha* 7-10-13 

6 -212 UFEBUOY 82 (CD.Fjti J lomo 7-IP-9 - 

7 FFO-MARCHHOOO 388 P.S] 

8 -654 F ARMEY GLSI19 


AS) N Chanfaertia 11-10-7 


PCarieny 
. P Niven 
- RS«Wfc 
STavteip) 
ADottai 
JStttph 
BSarey 


117 

115 


(F.S.SI J J owe 11-10-7 R Mefirafi (3) 
34555 MA6IC BLOOM 43 (Df.6) J JeBeraon 1M06 _ECtagtan 


10 5-PZ POTATO MAN 24 (D5| B Blcon 12-tiW C McCortbc* (5f 
113420 KARENASntlO 17 (5) Mra S&ratti 7-160 RWWmnn(5) 


123 
IDO 

107 
100 
117 

108 

11-4 cn*e»d art 5-1 Earral C*y 6-1 Hem*. Ltabuoy. 7-1 HflhtaaBi. Fanvy 
Ban. 10-1 Plata Mn. 12-\ afters 

4.40 DlIRDAR IMT098BMATE NATIONAL HUNT HAT 

RACE (£1.350: 2m II) (20) 


1 PBKV PATKffi'tR 12 (S) NTW9En4mcsS-ll.il 

J GoUflnn (7) 

P-BALTBLAtfSaoPtessKWitanHi-r - - f Crttfsn 

CAP H HAM) I4i S Srart 6-11-4- SPW«0 

F1-COPPSNJ0SH.2fi2PflJJ0Np8i-n-4 .RMcfinftffl 

GUSCUMNGHAM NtoU FMrv 6-11-4 . _ .. E Lie 

Wtt-SCOUNTRYKUwn6-II-< ... _ IriSOmeipl 

0LUatYM0W24SM«atelSn-4 ... . IftCBrwwiS) 

OVB1 THE SOLWAYl lings 6-H-*.WD«*ig(7) 

00 SAMSHAN143 KHn« 5-11-4. DT1taiBSl7) 

0SHAYBAP24ttsJ5liro5-n-4 ....Urfll 
O-mjJAM0fORMG62976fltoBrts6-i1-4 .. Bl 
Y0UN67HRUS70? H(tKXn-Oam 5-M-4 LSrd«ni(7j 
BOOKHGN0H F Itaphy6-10-13 .MrPMun*iyf7) 


CMS) KOPJE MSteSBi-IO-13. Slipup) 

GfflFffl. STAR F lAnrigh 6-10-13.J Magee {3> 

Cf7YG0frmvra*o«4-iW.. FU*yf3j 

0 JACK FLASH 24 5 KUBewJI 4-1M -- .. T Hngg (7) 
lUUalfTYr&LNESWMctaMn 4-iM. CMcEnmw*(5) 
06C01MAI LAD 34 GM Moore 4-1M -- _ NHanrey f7) 

SON OF AAAGON C Iterann 4-10-8 . — . HHanw*s(b) 

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af 


46 SPORT 


ATHLETICS: DISGRACED PROMOTER RALLIES SUPPORT 


Norman back on the 
inside track as BAF 


attempts kick-start 


By David Powell, athletics correspondent 


ANDY NORMAN, the disgraced 
former promotions officer for Brit¬ 
ish athletics, is playing an increas¬ 
ingly influential role in the 
collective effort to resuscitate the 
sport in this country. Norman has 
been helping with the supply of 
athletes for the Bupa indoor grand 
prix in Birmingham on Sunday, 
the first international track meet¬ 
ing in Britain since the British 
Athletic Federation (BAF) went into 
administration. According to Fati¬ 
ma Whitbread, his wife he "does 
not want to see the thing go to rack 
and ruin”. 

The athletes concerned are not 
only those managed by Norman 
bur some from outside his stable 
who are owed money by the BAF. 
Norman’s growing influence is the 
cause of some unease for David 
Moorcroft who. on being appointed 
as the BAF chief executive last July, 
said: "It is right that AiKiy no 
longer works for the federation." 

Moorcroft was a close friend of 
Cliff Temple, The Sunday Times 
journalist whose suicide in 1094 led 
to Norman's dismissal as the 
Federation’s promotions officer. 
During the AAAs indoor champi¬ 
onships at the weekend, Moorcroft 
declined to talk in detail about any 
role Norman may play in the 
future as the sport undergoes 
restructuring, but he is dearly 
disturbed at the thought of a dose 
working assodation. 

However, despite a call last 
month by Jonathan Edwards. Brit¬ 
ain's triple jump world record- 
holder. who is managed by 
Norman, for the former policeman 
to be put back in charge of 
promoting leading meetings, he is 
not interested, at least nor in the 
foreseeable future. The role be¬ 
comes vacant after the Bupa meet¬ 
ing. the last to be directed by Ian 
Stewart. 

Norman has other commitments 
rhar he would not want to give up, 
including a job that underlines has 
standing among senior interna¬ 
tional officials as a trouble-shooter. 
He has been hired by the European 
Athletic Association to help pro¬ 
mote and organise die European 
championships in Budapest in 
August, championships that are 
attempting to hold their ground 
despite the fact that they are not 
paying prize-money at a time when 
the International Amateur Athletic 


Federation is offering rich rewards 
at all its key events. 

Norman is also busy in South 
Africa, working on sport develop¬ 
ment; so busy, in fact, that 
Whitbread is flying out to give birth 
to their first child there in March. 
“He would not have given it 
[promoting British meetings] any 
thought whatsoever." Whitbread 
said. "He has worked overseas for 
the last four years and thoroughly 
enjoys what he does." 

According to Whitbread, the 1987 
javelin world champion. Norman 
is sympathetic towards the present 
crisis, rather than relishing die 
demise of the federation that 
dismissed him in tragic and acri¬ 
monious circumstances in 1994. 

FYom a position of strength in 
die 80s and early 90s, the BAF now 



Norman: influential 


has debts of £2 million, has been 
forced to put its headquarters up 
for sale and faces a legal bill of 
£750.000 over the Diane Modahl 
drugs case. 

Norman was removed after an 
inquiry into his conduct that 
followed Templet death. Norman 
continued to represent British ath¬ 
letes. securing deals for them to 
compete at home and abroad and. 
without his influence now. some of 
them might have refused to appear 
at the Bupa meeting, which is 
regarded as vital in helping to 
refloat die sport So. too. might 
athletes represented by Emanuel 
Hudson, the United States agent, 
whose client list includes Maurice 
Greene, the world 100 metres 
champion. 


"Andrew has talked with all his 
athletes and told diem to partici¬ 
pate if they can, 14 Whitbread said. 
“He has told than to be supportive 
because, with die problems they 
had last year not getting paid, a few 
have said they did not wish to 
compete. It is important everybody 
pruUs together to keep the package 
going." 

Hudson’s agency is among the 
BAP'S creditors, but he negotiated 
with Norman and Stewart for 
Greene, who set a 60 metres world 
record last week, and Jon Drum¬ 
mond to appear on Sunday . "Andy 
has good credibility with the 
agents." Hudson said. 

Stewart said that 98 per cent of 
the athlete deals for the Bupa 
meeting had been done by him 
and, asked who had been responsi¬ 
ble for the other two per cent, he 
said: “I do not want to be dragged 
into it" Stewart went on to praise 
Norman's spirit of co-operation. "I 
have always bund him very help¬ 
ful both in terms of advice and 
favours." 

When Whitbread talks of keep¬ 
ing the package going, she' is 
referring to the need to fulfil 
sponsorship and television obliga¬ 
tions, despite the turmoil. To what 
extent Norman is motivated by a 
warm feeling for British athletics, 
and how much is self-interest, is 
open to question, but his employ¬ 
ment as a consultant for Channel 4, 
which has the domestic television 
contract, clearly gives him a per¬ 
sonal interest beyond goodwill. 

Edwards revealed ms frustration 
in an interview with Athletics 
Weekly . calling for Norman’s re¬ 
turn because domestic meetings 
had become “a bit flat" and 
"competing in Britain has become 
a bit of a trial". Edwards said that 
Norman was upset that the sport 
he had helped to build had 
imploded. 

Whitbread said that business 
interests aside, her husband would 
be wary of returning to the spot¬ 
light of a media world where "there 
are some people who would like to 
cany on beating the drum". 

At the time of Temple’s death, 
and long after. Norman was the 
subject of intense media criticism. 
“He would not want to do some¬ 
thing that is going to create 
unnecessary anxiety for him and 
his family," Whitbread said. 


-_ 

THE TIMES TUESDAY FEBRUARY 101998 

TENNIS 



W illiams displays the Benson and Hedges Masters trophy that he captured in dramatic fashion 



E ven as Mark Williams was 
holding aloft the Benson 
and Hedges Masters tro¬ 
phy on Sunday night after a finish 
that will be chronicled as one of 
the most dramatic in snooker 
history, the long-term effects of 
such a defeat on Stephen Hendry 
were being pondered. 

Williams inflicted one of the 
heaviest losses of Hendry’s career 
when he prevaffed 9-2 in the final 
of the British Open last year, b&t 
that was correctly written off as an 
aberration. The impact of 
Hendry's latest setback could be 
measurably more significant. 

While it is impossible to remain 
immune to repeated cerebral re¬ 
runs of die missed re-spotted black 
to a middle pocket that Jed to such 
an agonising 109 reverse, the fact 
that Williams woo from three 
down with four to play is sure to 
perturb Hendry even more. 

During a 13-year professional 
career, in which he has earned 
more than £55 million in prize- 
money, been world champion six 
times and has won 64 tourna¬ 
ments. Hendry has been re¬ 
nowned as a rock-solid front- 
runner. It was a strikingly similar 


Phil Yates feels that 


Mark Williams has 


inflicted a severe 


psychological blow 


scenario to the memorable world 
championship final of 1985 when, 
m front of UL2 million viewers, 
Dennis Taylor, .who had been 7-0 
down, potted the black to edge 
Steve Davis 1847. ’ ' 

Davis was never quite die same 
dominant force again, even 
though he regained die world title 
in 1987 and successfully . d efended 
it in 1988 and 1989. It would 
appear Hendry will require a 
study resolve to shrug this off. 

Hendry finds any defeat unpal¬ 
atable, but coming to terms with 
losing to W illiams in such desper¬ 
ate circumstances having been so 
dose to a seventh Masters tri¬ 
umph. wfli be especially chall¬ 
enging. 

The Scot remains world No I 
but. on his own admission, has 
“not been the same player this 
season". It is dear that after losing 


on his past five appearances in a 
final since winning the Irish 
Masters last March, Ins' aura' of 
invincibility is in 'need* of 
renovation. "• 

WffDams, on the other hand, 
win gain inner strength from the 
way that he handled . misuse 
pressure in die dosing stages to 
collect a first prize of £145,00ft 
Trailing 9-6 after losing three 
successive frames in ratify 28 
minutes. Williams. 22, was enti¬ 
tled to become demoralised: In¬ 
stead, he. won the sixteenth frame 
on die pink, after Hendry had 
squandered die chance to dear up ’ 
for victory, and levelled at 9-9. 

Excitement reached a crescendo. 
when Wfifiams cleared brown'to.. 
Made to tie the settles at 5656 in 
the deciding frame before dis¬ 
patching ti»e re-spotted Uadi 
□ Matthew Stevens, of Cam- 
arthen. Tony GiappeL of Swan¬ 
sea. and Ryan Day, a 17-yearofcf 
amateur from Bridgend. comp3ed : 
marimum breaks during die 
Buckleys Bitter Challenge at Lla¬ 
nelli, on Sunday. It is the first time 
that three 147s have been recorded 
in any competition, let alone a 
one-day event 


Win ranks 
as revenge* 
for Muster 


FtaOMAux Ramsay 
IN DUBAI 


AN EXCLUSIVE READER OFFER 


the mmji VIES 


FREE GCSE CD-Rom, pocket 
book and audio tape worth £20 



By Robert Sheehan, bridge correspondent 



c / 
V ., .--T" 




1 



TWELFTH r—HW 
NIT.HT 




Doubles of One No-Trump should be for penalties. About the 
only exception is the sequence IX — Pass — I NT — Double. 
Most good players use that double to be take-out of the lefkhand 
opponent's suit (ie. of “X"). So what do you make of North's 
double in the sequence below? . 


Dealer West 




M*. 



Dame^^fee Smith 




T oday The Times is offering readers an English 
language CD-Rom, a Hutchinson maths pocket 
dictionary and an audio cassette of Shakespeare’s 
Twelfth Night which will help secondary students 
with their exam preparations. 

CCS£ English Part3A-D is a CD-Rom which 
covers reading, writing, spelling, punctuaton and 
grammar, using a variety of study methods, 
exercises and games. It also features extensive exam 
practice and the role-play game “Deadline” which 
teaches students to use their skills while working 
against the dock. 

You can also order, at greatly reduced prices, a 
further seven GCSE CDRoms, including English 
Reading and Writing Grades C-G, Physics Energy, 
Radioactivity and the Universe and Physics Waves, 
Forces and Motion. 


Hutchinson's Pocket Dictionary af Maths is an 
up to date and reliable maths reference in A-Z form. 
There are also another seven Hutchinson pocket 
reference books covering subjects such as Biology. 
Computing and Science al discounted prices. 

Twelfth Night features Dame Maggie Smith as 
Viola and Brenda Bruce as Olivia. Plus you can 
make savings on up to 11 other audio cassettes 
including abridged versions of King Lear, A 
Midsummer Night's Dream , Hamlet Othello, 
Macbeth and The Tempest. 

• To obtain the FREE 
offers, simply collect four 
out of six tokens published 
this week and attach them 


to an order form which win mMummm , . 

appear on Thursday. L—-« 



North-So nth game 

♦ Q92 

V K J 104 
*03 

♦ Q1D9B 


IMPS 


♦ B74 
*08765 

♦ AJ2 


pyeS:- - 




vis.r- 


*AJ 
¥32 
♦ K 7 64 
•AK74Z 


4K10653 
*A« . 

♦ 10065 
*53 


W 


1 H 
Pa 
AH 


Double 


TC 
1 NT 

Redoubto 


Contract: Two Spades by South 


2S 

Load: Jack of dubs 


This was a hand from the 1997 
Lederer Memorial TVophy. I 
was South, playing with Tony 
Forrester. I should have over- 
called One Spade over One 
Club — remember the particu¬ 
lar importance of that bid. 
cutting out my left-hand oppo¬ 
nent’s one-level red-suit 
responses. 

By a non-passed hand. 
North's double of East's One 
No-Trump is dearly penalty. 
If North wanted to make a 
takeout double showing 
spades and diamonds, he 
would have done so over the 
One Heart response. _ A likely 
hand is one strongish in hearts 
and dubs, say 15 points or 
more. Without a good lead of 
his own. South should lead a 
heart. 

I think this is also the 
correct interpretation of the 
double, even when North has 
passed on the first round of toe 


auction. Forrester was hoping 
to find me with a few more 
points. He could see that 
neither of toe opponents’ suits 
would be running. 

1 .realised that this is 
what he meant by the double, 
but, knowing that Ease-West 
had toe balance of.the high- 
card strength (ray 7' and 
Foil ester's maximum of 11 
making 18 for our side). I chose 
not to defend. 

As it happens, a spade lead 
would likely have beaten One 
No-Trump by at least two 
tricks, if declarer plays on 
dubs. Only if he is inspired 
enough to drop toe queen of 
diamonds will he get out for 
one off. Two Spades was three 
off 


□ Robert Sheehan writes on 
bridge Monday to Friday in 
Sport and in the Weekend 
section on Saturday. 


By Philip Howard 


ADESPOTA 

a. A tyrannical mistress 

b. A type of column 

c. Anonymous, works 


FALLAL 

a. A synthetic dye 


CHANGING TIMES 


b. Trivia 
c A confidence tridc 


CANAIGRE . 

a. Pickled duck ' 

b. A Canadian snow-boot 
cDock . 

BARRAMUNDI 

a. A fish 

b. A wonder of toe world. 

c. Arirailardance 

Answers on page 50 



• By Raymond Keene 

CHESS CORRESPONDENT 


Classic win 

ft was interesting to see that, 
in the elite tournament at Wijk 
aanZee, Anatoly Karpov,' the 

Fide champion, utterly failed 
to demonstrate any kind of 
superiority .over his leading 
rivals. This fact must cast 
some doubt on the procedures 
chosen by the world chess 
federation to determine their 
championship. 

In. partial far. Vlswanathan 
Anand; the. Indian grand¬ 
master (Karpov's defeated ri-. 
val in the Fide .final), and 
Vladimir Kramnik, toe Rus¬ 
sian grandmaster, ranked 
world No 2, who boycotted toe 
Fide event, both finished well 

ahead of Karpov al Wijk aan 

Zee. The game today shows 
Anand winning in classic style 
against, a. white isolated 
queen's pawn.. 

White: Valery Safov ■ 

Black: Viswanaihart Anand 
Wijk aan Zee 
January 1998 

Semi-Slav Defence 


.24 Rxc8 

. nXCo 

25. Bb3 

Nc4 

- 28 BXG4 . 

Rtt4 

: 27 f* . 

«• 

28 KI2 

- :B® 

SS gS . 

64 

30 Rd2 . 

Qd5 

\ 31 fidl 1 

K97 

:.- 32 &3 • 

twg3+ 

‘ 33 hxg3 : ‘ 

Rc& 

‘ 34 013 ’ 

' Qd6. 

35 b4 

Rc4 

J 36 aor 

" Qc7 ’ 

37 d5 

awfi 

re Ctee 

B02 


Rc & 


Qc8 

41 Rs3 

Qh3 

. 42 Odl 

Qh5+ 

’ .43 KB . ’. 

Qh2+ 

L 44 KJ3 ■ 

Rc8 

45. Obi . 

Bel 

46 Nxcl 

. Qh1 + 

- 47 KB 

Rxcl 

48 CM3 

Rgt 

• White resigns 



Diagram* of finalpositio^ 




FDR a nice chap. Thomas Muster 
can bear a grudge for an awfully 
long time. Ust night fte finaify got 
revenge over Sandon Stoife after a 
twoyear wait, beating toe tall 
Australian in a two-hour struggle 
to reach the second round of toe 
Dubai Open. He did so on foe 
same courtwhere Sterile had ruined 
Muster's celebration party in 1996- 
two days after toe Austrian had 
dimbed toe rankings ladder to 
Nol intheworid. 

Muster was too powerful for 
Stoile as he marched away with toe 
first set 6-3. Strife's main strength 

to many others, which protect 
explains why he lingers at No 100 
in the rankings, whfle Muster is 
trying to work his way bade to the 
top from No 16. Trying his luck 
from toe net. Sterile was outwitted 
and outpaced as Muster flexed his 

muscles from the baseline. 

Muster was aiming for his first 
victory of what has been a quiet 
year so far. Last year he wot here 
to daim only the second hard-court 
tide of his career and headed for the 
Upton championships to win his 
third. For a man known plainly as 
a day-court player, this was a 

welcome departure. 

A couple of errors at toe start of 
toe second sergave StoUe a hint of a 
chance. A double fault to lose bis 
service in the opening game fefa 
Muster playing cardi-up as StoflE^ 
began to nail the volleys that, had 
previously escaped him. He was 
also finding his range freon the 
baseline and suddenly looked a 
different dass of piayer. 

Muster levelled at 55 but could 
hot fake foe advantage in the tie- 
break. Heearned a rode violation 

for unsportsmanlike conduct when 

he; 'ranted at the umpire, Rudi 
Berger, who had overruled a line 
call foal would have given Muster 
aneaify break. Strife and Muster 
were at loggerheads for a further45 
minutes, until the ninth game of 
the third sei. when Muster created 
a break point with a forehand 
down foe fine and Sterile presented 
. his opponent with the lead, sending 
a backhand voUeykmg. Serving for 
foe match. Mister was not fettra 
this one get away, winning 6-3, ^ 
6-4 with a fireCU thumping fore¬ 
hand down the fine. 

. Felix MantiHa, the No 6 seed, 
eared into tile second roand with a 
straightforward 6-4, . 6-2 win over 
Karim Ahum. Magnus Norman 
took longer to get into his stride, 
eventually beating Albert Fortas 
6-2,44L6-3. . . 


f 

* 


0 


t 

d4 


2 

NI3‘ 

N« 

3 

04 

c6 

4 ' 

NcS 

cS 

5 

Bg5 

he 

0 

Bxfe 

0*8 

r 

o3 

Nd7 

8 

BcO 

6xc4 

9 

Sxc4 

ge . 

KU 

W) 

Bq7 

u 

Rtt 

o-o 

12. 

.863 

RU8. 

13 


Qe7 

T4 

RW1 

be 

15. 

,33 

. Bfa7 

16 

Ba2 

a6 

17 

Nd2 

cS 

ia 

N04 

CWJ4 

19 

exd4 

hS 

20 

NaS 

Nb6 

‘21 

Nxb7 

Qxb7 


N82 

Rac&- 

23 

Od3 

Od7 



*' • 1 % * 


Time-book. 


The T imes Winning Moves 2 
contains 240 chess ^wazfes 
from 'internaxfoiial grand¬ 
master Raymond Kerne's dai-. 
fy column: in The Times , aid is 
available now frombook¬ 
shops or from B.T. Batsfbrd 
Ud ftel: 01^6 321^6 «'£6.9Q 
ptos Postage arid packfttgl- 

P Raymond. Keene writes on . 
Jrass Monday. to. "Friday, in 
Sport -and -fa foe- ‘Weekend -- 
secuonon Saturday. 


ByRaymondKcene . 


Black to play. Utispasitfon k&om 

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101998 


SPORT 47 


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WINTER GAMES 

Denmark, the world brooze 
medal-winners were in less 
generous mood in the evening, 
inflicting a 9-3 defeat on Hay’s 
team and taking the edge off 
her 26th birthday . cele¬ 
brations. 

But fay then, the men, also 
Scotsmen every one, had 
outwitted Norway, who were 
skipped fay Eigfl RamsfjekL 
the worldS most successful 
exponent of “chess on ias". If 
Wt&in have a medal prospect 
at the XYUI Winter Olympics 
it is is men's curling. 

Karuizawa is a soothing 
retreat It is a resort boasting 
the distinction of- being the 
only place to host summer and 
winter Olympic- sports — 
showjumping during the To¬ 
kyo Olympics of 1964 carting - 
today. 

The curters'hase their .own■■ 
separate Olympic village dos-- 
er-knit than the thousands in 
Nagano. They have a game 
that inspires comradeship and 
guile. Played the way that RAF 
Flight Lieutenant Douglas 
Dry burgh, the Great Britain 
and his squ^ perform, it 
is a contest virile in aggression 
and passion. J admit to becom¬ 
ing a convert These competi¬ 
tors enjoy an esprit de corps 
Areign to the xmtitmtallion- 
mres from the National Hock¬ 
ey League here to ply Their 
trade. 

Curlers work by day, prac¬ 
tice and play by night, and 
when Dxyburgh'S quartet 
want victory more than the 
Norwegian four, even 
Ramstjekl,' an architect who 
has three times .been world 
champion, you share the un¬ 
abashed belief that gold is 
possible. . 

Ramsfjeld was qtock to con¬ 
cede after his team succumbed 
that this was a key encounter. 
By now, Britain will have been 
further tested by Switzerland 
and by tonight they will have 

t t Canada, who boast more 
yers than any of the curling 
nations. 


ic Games: Curlers begin their medal quest as the weather takes its toll of events 


quartet roar out their challenge 


Trom Rob Hughes 

CJMEf SPORTS WRITER 
.- IN. NAGANO 

THE : Emperor AJdhfto has 
returned tothe warmth of his 
; palace in Tbkyo.The b&ards 
zn the Japanese alps..have 
delayed the dow nhill, possibly 
even until next Monday. High 
winds have deprived, the ski- 
jumpers of valuable practice 
time....';' 

Why <fid we come do Japsm, 
die most southerly place to 
J»Jd a Winter Games, where 
We weatter- is notoriously 
Jdde, die events hard to cany 
through? 

Who, Down . to 

■ Karuizawa we go, the Bullet 
train our carnage, the indoor 
rink our destination* and curt 
ingourfpcusu - / , . 

Kfrsty Hay skipped'ihe afl- 
. Scottish Great Britain wom¬ 
en’s team to a first-round 
victory against Japan —- who 
finished fourth in the world 
championships ■ recovering 
from a 4-1 deficit at the 
hallway mark to win 7-i 

NAGANO 



Hay, die Great Britain skip, is a study in concentration as she plays her pari in the fusHnund victory over Japan yesterday. Photograph; Doug Pensinger/ Ailsport 


. -.It iscertain that the country 
that fanned the Royal Caledo¬ 
nian Curiing.Chib wiU leave a 
mark on these Games. Prin¬ 
cess Anne, together with Tony 
Banks, foe Minister for Spoil, 
passed up their invitation to 
see foe first game of curling as 
an dErial Olympic sport, pre¬ 
ferring to salute Georg HackL 
This champion of the luge 
had angered .Americans the 
previous day, but, by .yester¬ 
day, Sandy CaEgjkm, having 
protested m America’s same 
about prototype yellow boo¬ 
tees that he claimed, gave 
Hack! an unfair advantage. 


was resigned to defeat **[ 
guess even if he had worn 
snowboots he would lead.** 
Back on foe ice came the 
sounds of foe incessant move¬ 
ment of foe broomsticks, pol¬ 
ishing a path in front of the 
stones, -and the vernacular of 
the Scots, who unlike 
Caligfore, were resigned to no 
such outcome. Luce most 
spo rt sm en, they let rip with 
agricultural language and 
because they are wired up to 
microphones, they had to be 
asked by CBC, the Canadian 
television unit broadcasting 
the calling, to cooLiL • 


Cool? The Scots are quite in 
control when they glide gran¬ 
ite stones so heavy that two of 
them outweigh Midori ito. the 
diminutive ice skater who, 
even now, glows with pride at 
having had the final hand on 
the Olympic torch at the 
opening ceremony. 

Curling is known as' the 
roaring game, which is 
strange for something which 
looks like the ice cousin of 
bowls. Dryburgh is concentra¬ 
tion personified. Ronnie Napi¬ 
er is foil of Critic fire and the 
brothers Peter and Hifl Wil¬ 
son exclaim animatedly. The 


desire of these men to win a 
medal is tangible. 

The BBC has broken new 
ground. For foe first time in its 
seven decades it has shown 
curling live, albeit from mid¬ 
night to around 3am. The 
crowds here are always capac¬ 
ity, with only 1.700 permitted, 
and while Hay was telling her 
team to “take our fingers out*, 
a ticket tout from London, 
making enough profit to em¬ 
ploy a Japanese translator, 
was admitting the locals to the 
ancient art of black market 
profiteering. 

In the halL Dryburgh 


admitted Britain had picked 
off the nervous errors of 
Norway. “But make no mis¬ 
take, we know h will be a 
bunfight if we are to achieve 
what we want." 

Britain's victory came dra¬ 
matically when Pete Wilson, 
in the tense final end. so 
precisely directed and weight¬ 
ed his stone that he took out 
two Norwegian stones, and 
dropped his own in the very 
centre of the house — a shot 
that would, in other sports, be 
described as a buDseye. 

Outside the air was clear, 
the temperature sharp, and 


three young American women 
were queueing for the train to 
Nagano. Their team had been 
beaten by Sweden, but the 
wives could offer no comfort. 

“We are not allowed in the 
camp," said one. "We're for¬ 
bidden to coexist with them. 
They think we’d put our men 
off their game." These lonely 
women and no doubt those fair 
away in Scotland, share the 
experience that this, foe oldest 
of games, and the newest of 
Olympic disciplines, demands 
sacrifice and as much total 
obsession as any other sport 
It’s tough being an Olympian. 


Curling up for a night of unfulfilled passion 


T he wrong sort of snow has 
Men. Saves them right foe 
trying to hold a spotting 
event at this time of year, that's 
what I say. That is the trouble with 
winter sports. People will insist on 
playing them when they know the 
weather will be at its worst 
As I write these words in the 
Suffolk sunshine, I bear the first 
blackbird singing this year. What a 
delight it is. not to be in a placewith 
the wrong sort of snow. To travel 
across foe world in order to seek 
foul weather is flying in foe face of 
nature. Birds migrate from winter: 
sorely humans should do the same. 

To seek the snow is a deeply 
perverse tiring to do. And you can. 
hardly complain if you sew snow 
and then find it Sorry, world. We 
can’t taring you the snow events, 
becaure if s snowing. So it was that 
foe Winter Olympics began not 
with a bang bat a whimper. The 
men's downhill was postponed, 
then all the other alpineevents went 
the same way. 


Now this does not matter one way 
or another to you or me. Any day 
now. presumably, there will be 
chaps sliding abort on little planks 
and we will either catch it and enjoy 

ft or we won’t It is always a nice 
event to watch. But if we miss it 
most of us wfll be able to take rite 
disappointment m oar stride. 

But if you are trying to sell an 
event, rather than merely enjoy it. 
you have a problem. And if you are 
trying to sol an event whose bold 
on foie national, or for that matter 
the imagination is at 

best tenuous, then you are going to 
be fretting. Olympic organisers and 
television people are doing some 
very serious fretting. Please let ft 
stop snowing, or riselet tire big-time 
skating start! 

Downhill riding may not be the 
greatest sport in foe world, but ft is 
highly dashing and makes lovely 
pictures. The Olympic event four 
years in the gestation, is always 
worth an hour of anybody’s time. 
Bat instead, the Olympic night- 



watch was filled with women’s 
anting; and it is a hard thing to sefl 
that to the uncommitted. Great 
Britain took on Japan and ft was 
war to foe knife: I quickly devel¬ 
oped a passion for the Japanese 
skip, swooping like an eagle across 
the ice with all the anguish and 
intensity of a character in a 
Kurosawa film. But in the nature of 
things, anting passions are fleeting 
things for most of us. 

The contest turned out to be a 
tight one. but basically it brought 


out one of the important truths of 
the sporting life that sport is only 
incidentally entertaining. At heart, 
sport is a private matter between 
people trying to win something by 
whatever means they can. The 
audience are always interlopers, 
eavesdroppers and voyeurs. 

But television, and therefore foe 
powers in sport, are always desper¬ 
ate for sport to be entertaining. 
They need to catch the uncommit¬ 
ted. And instead of daring young 
men carving up a mountain in 
sprayed-on suits, we had an attri- 
tional carting match that even had 
the commentators apologising. 
Somebody might slide a stone in a 
slightly different way; “And thats 
when curling gets interesting." 
Which is good news for us all. 

The trouble with the Winter 
Olympics is that the programme is 
a little thin at the very best of times. 
And when the wrong sort of snow 
starts falling, the foil slimness of the 
event is laid hare. The emperor has 
no ridn-tight dofoes. So they 


chucked in a bit of ladies' moguls: 
“Women’s moguls have gone up by 
leaps and bounds." And mere was a 
bit of women's ice hockey, in which 
Canada beat Japan IX). That is as it 
should be ice hockey was invented 
so that Canadians could excel at 
something. 

1 remember four years ago there 
was a gun accident in an American 
household. A man was watching 
the ice hockey from the Winter 
Olympics and holding a pistol as he 
did so. Like you da “1 got so excited 
I accidentally shot myself," he said. 
He was taken to hospital 
with a gunshot wound in his 
leg. 

There is a moral to this story, but 
1 am not quite sure what it is. 
Perhaps it is that great events excite 
great passions. 1 just hope that no 
rme was watching the ladies’ curl¬ 
ing with a loaded pistol to hand, 
that’s afl. 

TELEVISIQN: Today. BBCf: 07450845; 2345- 
04 30 lOtympc Grandstand) Euraspoft 0700- 
0400 Tomorrow: B8C1: 12&-14 10; 23 50-05 00 
(Otymplc Grandson#. Euremsat 06 3046 30 


Schedules 
buried 
under new 
blizzard 

ORGANISERS insisted yes¬ 
terday that the Nagano 
Games would not be extended, 
in spree of another day of 
blizzards that forced more 
events to be postponed. The 
men's combined slalom be¬ 
came the latest alpine skiing 
victim, after the men’s down¬ 
hill was lost on Sunday, and 
the women's snowboarding 
giant slalom was also called 
off. 

Hundreds of soldiers and 
volunteers worked through 
the night to clear heavy snow, 
which is expected to continue 
falling today. Weather permit¬ 
ting. foe snowboarding slalom 
and men’s combined slalom 
skiing will be run today, and 
foe men’s downhill tomorrow. 

The Nagano Organising 
Commhee has drawn up more 
than forty different schedules 
for the skiing events in case 
foe bad weather causes an 
even bigger backlog, but its 
problems have hardly been 
helped by a flu bug sweeping 
through foe dty. 

Georg Hackl became only 
the sixth Olympian to win 
three successive gold medals 
in the same event at foe 
Winter Games after comfort¬ 
ably consolidating his over¬ 
night lead in the men’s luge 
yesterday. Having lowered the 
track record twice on the 
opening day, he was again 
fastest on both the final runs 
yesterday. 

Four years ago in Lille- 
hammer, Markus Prock. of 
Austria, pushed him to the 
limit as he snatched foe gold 
medal Ity a margin of just 
13,000th of a second, but this 
time Hackl was never under 
the same pressure, raring to 
victory with more than half a 
second to spare in an aggre¬ 
gate time of 3min lS-436sec. 

Hackl described his feelings 
as “awesome” as he celebrated 
his triumph. "After foe third 
run I was sure 1 could win 
because I could have gone 
down blindfold if I had to." 

It remains to be seen 
whether Hackl trill still be 
around for foe next Games in 
Salt Lake City, "Four years is 
far away." he said. “I want to 
compete in next year’s world 
championships because 
they Ye in my home town of 
Berchdesgaden. Then we’ll 
see." 

In the men’s 30-ldlometres 
classical cross country. Mika 
Myllylae. of Ftnalnd, won in 
for 33min S55sec. to give his 
country' its first individual 
gold in 34 years. Erlin Jevne, 
of Norway, took the silver, 
while foe bronze went to Silvio 
Fauner. of Italy. 

On foe ice rink. Ruslan Salei 
became foe first National 
Hockey League player ro score 
at foe Olympics, helping 
Belarus rout Germany S-2 and 
more or less sea] a berth in foe 
medal round against foe so- 
called NHL Dream Teams. 

Belarus will advance if 
France beat Japan later today. 
Should Japan win. Belarus 
would need only a draw' with 
foe hosts tomorrow io go 
through into championship 
group B alongside Russia, 
Finland and the Czech Repub¬ 
lic. Oleg Antonenko, who 
scored foe game’s first goal, 
suffered a knee injury later in 
the first period and may have 
to miss foe rest of the 
tournament. 


TODAY S FIXTURES 


RESULTS FROM NAGANO 


FOOTBAiJ- 
Kick-oil 7.30 untoss stated 
B fcrrtBrnaHonal match 


(kits Hatm 7.45) —-. 

NaOorwMe league 
FkaC dfvtetan . 

Tranmsra v Swindon (7.45)--- 

Second cBvncn 

No rtha m pto n vWycnrrtie (7.45) -— 
ThW division 

Peterborough v Donc a ster (7.45) ..- 

VurtiaB Conference 

Dcmw v Famborouftft (T- 4 ®) --- 

HaraSord v TeSord|7.*5j--- 

Beffa Scottish League 

Rratdwsfen 

AreftfevAp .— - : — 

SeconddMsion 

gpBigsimvpydebank ——-- 

Thktf division 

Cowdenbeath vMbion -- 

County v East SBrfng .... -.- ■ 

UWBOND lEAGUB Prom&r ****• 

Leigh RM v WreftwJ fla1*“** 
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GreaiSwood ftesMenTe Off 


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7.MAfta*miafl7.ue[)iorta LEGAL & PUBLIC NOTICES 

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13823.7; 10. P Etoteson (Sw) 124.47.0; 

11. J Mae (E&O 12&S23. 12. V Smktw 
(Khz) 13859.1. 


0171-782 7344 


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CURLING 


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GanTsny 2; Sweden 8 Unhsd States S; 
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ICE HOCKEY 


MEN: Group a Betel* B Gemaiy Z 
WO UBt Prefcrinary round: Rntand 11 
Oral 1; Unied State. 7 Sweden 1; 
Canada 2 Odia 0. 




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3614:10. E toridb (II) 3B&. 11. G Maas 
(Nor)3632:12 M Hert (Japan) 3837; 12 T 
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I MEDALS TABLE 1 


Holafld- 

Russia- 

Gormany.. 

Bulgaria-- 

Canada.- 

ftfcnd.-, 

Ha*.- 

Norway _I 

U(9*e - 1 

Befeium.—-I 

SatoEriand -.-I 


TIMETABLE 


AS times <3MT 

TODAY: WdnWit end 100ft Men's 
round txrfng. (SOCt Worn- 
_ Snery romt cuing. Mid- 
nfaht Wtxrwi'e lOton cteaSic norrfc 
0030: Women's giant Steiom 


swing. 0500 : Man a >» 

VJ^an; Kazakhstan ^ 
teMv Austria; ftanca v Germany. 0500: 
Women's dngte lupo. 0730: Men's 
500m spaed slcafing. 1100: Ptes tree 
programme sfcatrt3. 

TOMORROW: MUnJgte and 100tt 
Women's prafimlrwry round cuing. 
050ft Men’s presmireiy round ftjrtnn- 
003ft SOm sw tumping. 010ft Men s 
dbwrtW sfcflng. 030ft Mogul fttete 
trwsayte sking. 030ft Woman's toe 
hockey. 040ft Men's 20km bJattiion. 
050ft Women s Singie kioe. 0600: 
Women’s 3,000m speed staling. 



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-•*. • 


. —L*.a' • .A--- 


48 SPORT 


THE TIMES TUESDAY FEBRUARY 10 I99S 


Candid England captain talks about Owen, Sutton, Stevenage and his joy at return to squad 


Shearer delighted 


MOBCASPLAtS 


to practise 
his sharp shooting 


By Oliver.Holt, football correspondent 


MICHAEL OWEN handled it 
all with aplomb, as we had 
been fold he would. Nothing is 
supposed to phase him and 
nothing did. Like a young 
Alan Shearer in that respect, 
people always say. Only yes¬ 
terday. Shearer departed from 
the script. He was not like an 
old Michael Owen at all. Not 
non-committal but feisty, not 
studiously non-controversial 
but opinionated. Not bland 
but animated. And most of all, 
glad to be back. 

If the arrival of Owen has 
been greeted with the same 
fervour as the performance of 
a first symphony from a 
brilliant new composer, so the 
rerum of Shearer has been 
met with the kind of delight 
that comes with the public 
display of an Old Master 
hidden for an age from public 
view. One brings virgin excite¬ 
ment, the other the thrill of a 
talent in full bloom. 

Yesterday, at Bisham Ab¬ 
bey. it was as though it was all 
new to the England captain 
again, as if it were his first 
call-up to the squad, just as it 
was Owen's. He has played a 
part in six games for 
Newcastle United now, since 


his return from the severe 
ankle injury that threatened 
his career and kept him inac¬ 
tive for six months. The unex¬ 
pected gift of involvement in 
the squad for the internation¬ 
al against Chile at Wembley 
tomorrow night has invigorat¬ 
ed him as if it were a great 
gulp of nectar. 

So happy is he to be playing 
a pan drat he could not hide 
his astonishment at the fact 
that his former Blackburn 
Rovers team-mate. Chris Sut¬ 
ton, a colleague with whom, 
admittedly, he never enjoyed 
the warmest of relationships, 
had turned his hack on the 
chance of playing for the 
England B team at The Haw¬ 
thorns tonight 

“1 was very surprised when 
1 heard about his derision,” 
Shearer said. “1 am sure he 
has got his own reasons for 
doing it but for me. to throw 
away the chance of playing for 
your country. I cannot under¬ 
stand it Four months ago, 
when I was just starring my 
rehabilitation from the injury. 
I would have given anything 
to represent England. 

“I have been told I will not 
be starting the game tomor- 


FA seeks guidance on 
counselling players 


By Matt Dickinson 


THERE have been occasions 
when Glenn Hod die appears 
to have spent more time 
counselling than coaching his 
England squad. So much so, 
in fact that he is encouraging 
the Football Association to 
employ a full-time shoulder 
for the players to cry on. 

The recruitment of a coun¬ 
sellor has been discussed at 
Lancaster Gate in the light of 
the increasing number of 
players who have been ad¬ 
vised. or on several occasions 
forced, to turn to professional 
help to overcome off-field 
problems. 

Hoddle is understood to be 
the principal backer of such 
an appointment, and it will 
come as little surprise to his 
players who know first-hand 
his belief in the ways of faith 
healing. 

Robbie Fowler was the 
latest to be encouraged to visit 
Eileen Drewery, a 57-yearold 
from Wokingham, who 
helped the England coach to 
develop his spiritualist ap¬ 
proach to curing injuries and 
dealing with personal trau¬ 
mas. As aTottenham Hotspur 
player. Hoddle talked of a 


strain being healed by 
Drewery's powers of concen¬ 
tration and relaxation, and 
Paul Ince, Paul Gascoigne 
and Darren Anderton are 
among the internationals un¬ 
derstood to have been advised 
to take advantage of her 
unusual methods. 

As well as being able to 
provide motivation for top 
players, a candidate for a 
counselling post would have 
to be able to deal with a wide 
range of atisdemeanoursL The 
England party contains reha¬ 
bilitating alcoholics, drink 
drivers, a reformed drug- 
taker and an alleged wife- 
beater, while lan Wright, has 
undergone rage counselling. 

England are already facing 
logistical difficulties in hying 
to work out how to cope with 
the large number of staff that 
they want to take to the World 
Cup in France this summer, 
as well as on the pre-tourna¬ 
ment trips to Morocco and 
Spain. As well as the players, 
the party will also include at 
least 20 members of the 
support team, including 
coaches, masseurs, doctors, 
administrators and a chef. 


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row. but I sincerely hope to 
play some part in it. I need 
matches now. I am St as 1 am 
ever going to be from doing 
stamina work and long run¬ 
ning, but 1 need games to get 
match fit. I am not 100 per cent 
yet but I am getting there. 
There is just a bit of sharpness 
still to come back. 

“There is an enthusiasm 
about me now that I cannot 
help because 1 have missed the 
last six months of football and 
I am so happy to be back 
playing at whatever level. If 
there is a positive thing to take 
out of being out for such a long 
time, it is mat I will only have 
played half a season and 
hopefully that will be a benefit 
tome.” 

Shearer, still smarting from 
the . slough of uncommonly 
adverse publicity he received 
in the aftermath of Newcas¬ 
tle's FA Cup fourth-round 
replay victory over Stevenage 
Borough, explained that he 
had run off the pitch without 
swapping shirts after the sec¬ 
ond tie at St James Park 
because he had been sum¬ 
moned to an interview and the 
shirt had already been prom¬ 
ised to “an extremely good 
cause". 

He said he was over any of 
the mental barriers that might 
have accompanied such a long 
lay off. His first heavy tackle, 
wirh Paul Ince in a match 
against Liverpool, had left him 
with no ill-effects and he was 
raring to go. His only reserva¬ 
tions. he said, were about 
whether he would make it into 
the team given the quality of 
the other candidates. 

He said that Owen was 
“special", that Andy Cole was 
revelling in the extra responsi¬ 
bility given him now that Eric 
Cantona had left Manchester 
United and that Alex Fergu¬ 
son was fortunate indeed to 
have two such gifted front 
players as Teddy Sheringham 
and Paul Scholes. 

And then, to wind things up. 
Shearer gave one last indica¬ 
tion of his new mood. Some¬ 
body asked him about his 
injury and, sternly, he correct¬ 
ed them. "My old injury, you 
mean." he said. 

□ Glenn Hoddle, the England 
manager, will insist on total 
privacy for his squad in the 36 
hours before every match in 
the World Cup this summer. 

“During the World Cup the 
players will not talk to the 
media on the day before a 
game," Hoddle said. “On the 
day before a game all the 
players will be training and 
resting. 1 wan} people to 
understand that, to get used to 
that now." . 



Merson in 


mood to 
take on the 
world 


By Matt Dickinson 


Fowler found fame and fortune early. Now he is more streetwise and able to cope with the first stump in his career 


Fowler promises to strike back 


C lose up. Robbie Fowler 
presents a rather more 
striking image than 
most newspaper readers 
would suspect. In muddy 
newsprint photographs he 
has an open-mouthed, thick¬ 
set appearance: In reality, he 
is more angular, his dark 
features Uluminated by a shy. 
handsome smile. 

The smile is used to add a 
touch of irony when he re¬ 
flects on life at the moment 
“Things are going just great 
for me just now. aren't they." 
he said. For the first time on 
his magiocaipet ride to fame 
and fortune, the Liverpool 
forward has experienced 
some turbulence. His form 
has dipped and even- the 
assured touch that brought 
him 30 goals in each of the 
past three seasons has tempo¬ 
rarily deserted him. 

That is not all. Fowler was 
portrayed as greedy after it 
was reported that he is asking 
for £50,000 a week in contract 
negotiations. This week, de¬ 
spite a goal on his last 
international outing, he will 
be training at Anfieid while 
the players in two England 
squads — inducting Michael 
Owen, his precocious young 
partner — scrap for a place at 
the World Cup finals. 


David Maddock on the forward 


suffering from smears and rejection 


Worst of alL though, is a 
malicious rumour that has 
spread across Menxyside like 
a rash, linking him with 
drugs. One senses that if 
anything is getting Fowler 
down at the moment, then it is 
this untruth. "1 even had a 
letter from someone in Bris¬ 
tol so it must have spread all 
the way down there," he said. 
“I know that most young 
footballers tend to be the 
target for these sort of ridicu¬ 
lous rumours, but it is annoy¬ 
ing sometimes, even though it 
is so obviously a tie." 

Fowler pointed out that he 
is a professional athlete with 
far too much at stake ever to 
take drugs. And yet the ru¬ 
mour persists, despite an over¬ 
whelming volume of evidence 
undermining its cruel asser¬ 
tion. Liverpool players are 
regularly screened under the 
Football Association pro¬ 
gramme and the FA unit will 
tell anyone prepared to listen 
dial no one at the dub has 
ever tested positive: 

Also annoying, although he 
is far too diplomatic to suggest 


il was the decision by Glenn 
Hoddle, the England coach, 
to omit him for the match 
against Chile tomorrow. ’ 
Fowler does not believe that it 
was connected with his'with¬ 
drawal from the party that 
took part in Le Tournoi in 
France last year in order to 
have an operation. 

“When 1 was dropped, the 
manager telephoned me and 
said that it was sirapty a case 
of haring a look at some other 
options." he said. "He said 
that when 1 am back to form, 
then IH be back in the squad, 
and that's fair enough. I am 
no different from anyone dse. 
If I am out of form which 
cranes to all players at some 
time or other, then I have no 
divine, right to be picked.” 

So why has his touch desert¬ 
ed him? Fowler offers two 
points in response. He said 
that he is still joint top-scqrer 
at AnfiekL despite having 
played fewer games than 
Owen, and that Liverpool —. 
the defeat against Southamp¬ 
ton on Saturday apart — are 
still winning. 


"I haven't been at my best, 
it’s true," he said, "but people 
seem to forget that 1 hadn’t 
played for six months because 
of injuries and so there was 
bound to be some reaction 
when I came back. I probably 
rushed back too early as well 
But I 'halve kept on scoring 
and contributing. 

"Some strikers need to be 
on top of their game, but lU 
never hide, even. If I’m not 
playing brilliantly. If 1 miss 
then Ill keep niy bead up. 
confident that 111 put the next 
one away, t know IHeome 
through it" 

Liverpool know it, too. That 
is why they have begun negor. 
tiatkms to keep him .at- the' 
dub until well into die next 
century. Even here though. 
Fowler has experienced ag¬ 
gravation. "Some-of the fig¬ 
ures the papers have quoted 
are laughable," he said, “but 
people stiff believe it" 

Fowler will always attract 
rumours and adverse publici¬ 
ty- It is, he believes, because 
he had'fame thrust upon him 
at an age wbeo be was not 
property equipped to deal 
with it "It doesn't bother me 
at all" he said, with a dismis¬ 
sive sweep of the hand. His 
eyes though, tell a different 
story. - 


PAUL MERSON did not want 
fo be drawn into (he Chris 
Sutton affair. "Chris never 
said anything about me when 
I admitted the cocaine," was 
all he'would say. 

Five minutes later, and 
without mentioning Sutton’s 
name, Merson had inadver¬ 
tently given the most eioqucat 
and intelligent explanation jW 
of why the Blackburn Rovers 
striker’s decision not to play 
for England B against Chile 
tonight could prove to be the 
biggest regret of his career. 

“Who would have thought 
Paul Gascoigne would go to 
the 1990 World -Cup?" the 
Middlesbrough striker asked. 
"He was playing in B games 
just a few months before and 
David Plait wasn’t in the First 
team either. Yet they were the 
two big names to come out of 
the tournament. 

"That is what everyone in 
the B squad has got to think. 
Football changes very quickly. 
Anything can happen in the 
next few months. And whafc 
.more do you want than to 
playing for England?" 

So. while for Sutton the 
game at The Hawthorns to¬ 
night was to be a "hiding ter 
nothing", for tlw former 
Arsenal player, 29 and wirh 15 
caps to his name, it is a chance 
to catch Glenn noddle's eye 
and possibly, just possibly, 
snatch a place on the plane to 
the World Cup finals in 
France this summer. 

Merson was named captain 
of die B team yesterday and it 
-is unlikely that Hoddle will 
regard anyone else but him 
and Rio Ferdinand as poten¬ 
tial candidates for the full 
squad this summer. 

The England, coach said 
recently that he is happier 
risk a teenage striker — her” 
Michael Owen's senior call-up 
— than an inexperienced de¬ 
fender, hence . Ferdinand’s 
place in the reserves. 

He may, however, give a 
glimpse of the future tonight 
by employing the West Ham 
United player in a sweeper* 
role, a position he had origi¬ 
nally earmarked for Jamie 
Redknapp until the Liverpool 
'■fclayertr withdrawal bemuse 
of injury^ - 

. The classic sweeper system, 
with- a playmaker behind a 
back four, is HoddlCs ideal 
Strategy and one that he 
considered trying to imple¬ 
ment in time for France this 
summer. That ; ambitious 
project appears to have been 
shelved, but the first trial run 
may he on show in the Mid¬ 
lands tonight. - /Y 

ENGtAND S (possMe. 1-J-3-ZJ K Pwsfr ' 
mari (SheBeW Wednesday) - R Fardh 
nand (Wtest Ham Urttad) — K Dyer 
D MHttBO i Liverpool). R 



~ TL p **5*1 Wisacwi. 
Hudwrtv (£o«nty Otyj 


McMenemy has 
Irish at heart 


IF Jack Charlton was casting a 
shadow over his press confer¬ 
ence in Belfast yesterday, then 
Lawrie McMenemy did not 
mind one bit. Charlton is the 
man that McMenemy, who 
was being confirmed as the 
new manager or Northern 
Ireland, wants to emulate. 

"1 want to do for Northern 
Ireland what Jack Charlton 
did for the Republic of Ire¬ 
land," McMenemy said. “Jack 
is a good friend of mine and 
he's from the same pan or the 
country as me. the North East 
It’s my ambition to see North¬ 
ern Ireland qualify for the 
European championships." In 
the short term, anyway. 

With Pat Jennings and Joe 
Jordan acting as his assis¬ 
tants. McMenemy has be¬ 
come the first non-Irish 
manager of Northern Ireland. 
He first learnt of the Irish 
Football Association’s fIFAJ 
interest a month ago when he 
read a story linking him with 
the job on Teletext A week 
later. Jim Boyce, the LFA 
president, made contact and 
McMenemy, the former 
Southampton manager and 
England No 2, confirmed that 
he was interested. 

Boyce, who had headed the 
search for a successor to 
Bryan Hamilton, who was 
dismissed in October, had 
Chariton’s achievements in 
mind when he opted for 
McMenemy/This is a major 
step forward and it is the firsr 
time that the I FA has appoint¬ 
ed a non-Irish manager and 
we feel the Northern Ireland 
public wifi be behind il" he 
said. 

“If you look at other coun¬ 
tries. like Switzerland, they 
were below us in the world 
rankings until they appointed 
Roy Hodgson, who took them 
to the World Cup finals. When 


Jack Chariton was appointed 
manager of the Republic, they 
took a pall in Dublin, which 
showed that only four per cent 
of the people backed him and, 
yet look how he turned out 
"I believe that Northern 
Ireland have their best quota 
of top players for many years 
with so many of them playing 
in the Premiership and earn¬ 
ing man of the match awards, 
such as Keith Gillespie, Steve 
Lomas and Michael Hughes. 
We’re all looking forward to 
the future now," he said. 



McMenemy: experience 


McMenemy and Jordan are 
folJ-time appointment, while 
Jennings is part-time because 
he is already the Tottenham 
Hotspur goalkeeping coach. 
The contracts of all three run 
until the end of the European 
championship in 2000. 

McMenemy will be at 
Northern Ireland's B interna¬ 
tional against the Republic of 
Ireland at Tolka Park on 
Wednesday. His first game in 
charge will be against Switzer¬ 
land at Windsor Park on April 
22. although the IFA are still 
trying to arrange a match for 
March 25- 


Uefa stands 


against 

Wimbledon 


proposal 


WIMBLEDON'S hopes of 
moving to Dublin suffered a. 
setback last night when Uefa. 
European football’s govern¬ 
ing body, announced that it 
would do everything that it 
can to stop them. In a state¬ 
ment. Uefa said: "We do not 
support such a move because 
of the damaging effect it 
would have on domestic foot¬ 
ball in European countries. 

’’Furthermore, Uefa 
emphasises that in accor¬ 
dance with its statutes, foot¬ 
ball played within a national 
territory is the responsibility 
of the Uefa member associ¬ 
ation of the territory con¬ 
cerned. For this reason. Uefa 
is against any move to play 
domestic football outside a 
national territory.” 

Aston Villa will attempt to 
hasten the departure of Savo 
Milosevic after the striker 
refused to act as a substitute 
in the FA Carling Premier¬ 
ship game against Doty 
County last Saturday. Milo¬ 
sevic, placed on die transfer 
list for a spitting gesture 
towards Villa fans in January, 
told Brian Little, the manager, 
that he has no intention of 
appearing for the dub again. 

Little imposed a second 
heavy fine in a month, be¬ 
lieved to be around £15.000, 
on the Yugoslavia interna¬ 
tional yesterday. 

□ The Football Association 
found Solihull Borough and 
John Paul Robinson, the ref¬ 
eree. not guilty of misconduct 
at a hearing in Sheffield 
yesterday. Darlington had al¬ 
leged that their officials had 
seen the referee accepting 
money bom representatives 
of the Dr Martens midland 
division club. 


Animal passions rouse 
Brazilians into action 


AS BRAZIL slouch unconvinc¬ 
ingly towards some kind of' 
victory in the egregious Gold 
Cup. Mario Zagallo, their 
anxious coach, has issued his 
players with a list of 14 
demands. In Brazil itself. Pde, 
now Minister for Sprat, is, for 
the third time in his life, in 
deep potential trouble with his 
finances. 

Having played like drains to 
draw with bumble Jamaica 
and Guatemala, the Brazil¬ 
ians roused themselves on 
Sunday in Los Angeles to 
defeat El Salvador 4-0. The 
third and fourth goals came 
from Giovanni, of Barcelona. 
Ed mundo and Romano got 

the others. 

When Edmundo, alias “The 
Animal", returns to Florence, 
there is plainly trouble in 
store. This brilliant bur violent 
player has made it dear thai 
he is not content to sit on the 
Fiorentina bench, playing sec¬ 
ond fiddle to Gabriel 
Batistuta, of Argentina (to 
whom, however, he has paid 
generous tribute}, and to Luis 
Oliveira, on whom he has 
poured scorn. 

Ronaldo was not playing for 
Brazil against El Salvador, 
having fulfilled his stipulated 
quota of internationals, so 
could thus turn our at the San 
Siro for Internationale against 
Bologna. However, he, like his 
team, had a poor game — the 
worst of the season, according 
To Gigi Simonl die Inter coach 
— and Bologna beat them 1-0, 
the goal set up by Roberto 
Baggio, in fine form after his 
recent discord with Renzo 
Ulivieri, the Bologna coach. 

That Zagallo is uneasy is 
shown by -hia-recourse to 
Edmundo, whom he seemed 
to have dropped after the 
player punched a Bolivian 
opponent in the last Capa 


BRIAN GLANVILLE 



Overseas View 


America tournament. Zag- 
allo’s 14-pomt charter for his 
players indudes an insistence 
on no .late nights* better co¬ 
operation with the press, no 
more stunts (such as 1 -every 
player shaving his head) and 
no more wives or girlfriends in 
training camp. * 

Meanwhile, Fefe has been 
accused of not dedaring for 
tax the profits of his company 
Sport & Marketing, on the 
television rights to Uruguay 
and Bolivia World Cup mftch- 

5 jL h .“ helped 

that Helio Vianna, his part¬ 
ner has said that they were 
both too busy abroad to keep 
up with what was going on in 
meir.oqmpimy. 

the situation has shades if 
20 years ago. when Pete inno¬ 
cently. found himself landed 
with huge debts and .fines 
tocurred by a company called 
Filolax. forcing him to come 
our of. retirement and ofay for 
the New York Cosmbs. -C 
man who brought him into 
Filolax was: Zjio. his former 
World Cup; team-mate, wtm 
had earlier introduced him To 


P6pG Gordo, a Spanish agent, 
who ran through the young 
star's money. • 

In the African nations’ o£* 
t there was a thrilling game 
played in Bobo Dionlasso 
between Ivory Coast and the 
new .revelation of African foqfl' 
ball, the resilient Namibians-." 
Not a bit demoralised by ihb 
fad that Ivory Coast went >0 
up in the first half, two of the 
goals scored by Tiehi. Namib¬ 
ia hit back after halttime, 
levelling at 3-3. two of their 
goals going to shreute, a 
striker that European dubs 
wfll soon surely be c o ur ting. 
Alas for Namibia, Diabate got 
the winner for Ivory Coast five 
minutes from the end ; 

In Spain, both the' big 
Madnd dubs are having zrou- 
ble with an Jtaiian star, Chris- 
Vieri, the big 
international centre forward 
whom Juventus trtoisferttdf so 
^toensrvely. to Afleticb'-last 
summer, hates it there, 
not go to restaurants with h£s 

K*n-mates and refiisfcs- to 
S pafash. Even Jesus 03 
yeti, die Aitetico president, 
cannot «_■ „ „ ■ 



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FEBRUARY 101998 



SPORT 49 


‘■LU. • 




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' ”‘T 

•-i V 


on* rouse 
ito action 



| ne of rugby union’s ^ 
BIOS' r • famous mes- w 
sages^ remains that 
sent by ‘Paul Roos.chairman, 
OftheScaJthAfiica selectors, to 
Ae.lW: touring.feam in-New 
Zealand. . It said simply: 
"Serum,; scram, scram". Thai 
area -of the ©one remains as - : 
fundamental now as it was 
then, despite changes to the 
iaWs and various attempts to 
de-power the scrum for safety 
reasons.--- 

If . Engfecndl and Ireland, 

- losing sides air the first week- 
’ end of-Tth© .Five Nations 
•; Champonship, did not realise 
.; that before, men they do how. 

1 So many of England's troubles •• 
‘. in ftuis last Saturday could he 
traced , bade to an insecure 
. saiim; , while-. Ireland would 
surety have secured vtctoiy- 
over Scotland ‘had they been. 
aBte to force home a series of 
frewraetre. scrums midway, 
-through the second half. 

"I don't dunk we lost the 
game because of-the scrum-. 

• mage," Cfive Woodward, the ^ 
Ehgfemd coach, said in the 
immediate aftermath of defeat 
by Prance. “Sane of them 

f went Q& at some we had- 
problems, but I. dunk we 
- pkkaftherighl props.'’ In feat 
latter reispect he is probabty 
right. There is no evidence to 
suggest that any other English 
players would have made a 
better fist of handling Chris¬ 
tian Califano and 
_ Franck. Toumaire. nor 
wffl&Qrfece the same 
kind of questions in 
their /games against 
the threehoane unions. 

The problem will 
• not,-' however, go __ 
away , ft is one that the 
British Isles had to overcome" 
in South Africa last summer, 

- when it was. identified that 
Jason Leonard and Graham 
Rowntree ought be unable to 
^ handle their - opposite num-. 
■Pr bers. but that Rstul Wallace 
and Ton Smith could. The 
Lions, driven by Jim Teller, 
put down scrum after scrum 
in training, withthe result that • 
Wallace and Smith resolutely; 
refused to take a backward 
step against much bigger 
opponents. Os du Kantit and 
Adrian Garvey. 

Those twogeotiemen await 
and in toe s umm er.atthe 
of . a tour during which • 


ATHLETICS 

NATIONAL ARENA. Ondntfm AAA 
champiQnst4fW Pol* vault *■ JTlMtocfc 
iTmUarf) 4.11rrc Z R Ctafc* (&*®c) 3 80; 
3. E Horny OrcftflNcf) 3SD. Sta* .1.-4 
Ortas <p5dc«l lR23rac 2. J ftioran 
[Esse*} U 87; 3.VFctt* VUmM) WAA 

BADMINTON T T 

HRKHAM. Lancashire: FHsnd*Prwfeto* 
BrtWi OHIO Staa Bnste: M« StotfM 
D Hst (E*«wJ bt M Edge (lano)J59. 
15-2 Dcubtac S Arehsr (Worca) aid C 
Hud (Lancs] brJ ftu barwon Wcrtharta] 
end N Robert** {Vote* 17-H 1H 
Woraatc Stnstw K « S 

ttW*(Scofl n-2, f 1-4- Ctoubfctc.J Goo* 

ssassM 

and Krtoua 15-3 pat. 

BASKETBALL 

BUOWBSER LEAGUE C imt* J«s to 
London Loopmte 72r L ondon Ttwcre to 
Manchesw Garts 55. Oytiri f^taoa 77 
BknhcMh BUtets 93: irtrastsc Rstes 82 
Thames Vafcjr T«« 86- 

P W L P» 

Burincfam...- jM ]» f ® 

London Laoptfds-. ~ Z4 W -5 38 

SSSlTSSr..... SB « 7--to 

ShBflWd..22 1? * 36 

Newcastle___25 T7 8 34 

tSmiKValoy-- 23 15 8 to 

f Mancteser....... 24 11 13 22 

Chester....23 10 13 20 

LflcesjBf- 23 » “ 

Oeibv „.. 22 . B • I* “6 

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wSSna_ 35 S 21 10 

wSSS 8 -- as a W 4 

NATIONAL ASSOCIATION (NBA): ASSW 
gwna:Easll3S«tesni4. 

BOWLS " 

CO ANIRM: Irish *£'2S^S3*K 
Paha; Boat Brtar and Booth bt Ffinwras 
and Hartaw 7-2.7-3.4-7.7-3. 

BOXING 
LAKE CHARLES. Lpuiston g 

'“^■vtSKS&sr 

VaBe (P ftcoj pea 

CRICKET 


DAVID HANDS 



Rugby Union 
Commentary 


they wifi also run up against 
Craig Dowd and Olo Brown, 
the New .Zealand props- who 
are as accomplished as any in 
die wbrid. If-they are to play 
-Woodward's game of move¬ 
ment against those opponents,, 
they must have a scrum dial 
stands firm and that does not 
twist and contort as England . 
did against the Reach. 

- The name of Rowntree wfil 
surety be discussed by file 
England management when 
they considertheir XV to play 
Wales at Twickenham on Feb¬ 
ruary 21. The Leicester loose- 
head prop worked hard athis 
game over the Christmas per¬ 


. ‘Rowntree’s name will 
surety be discussed by 
the England managamenf 


iod and seems for more likely 
to offer a running game than 
Jason Leonard, who has new 
won 60 En gland caps 'but 
whose form all season has 
fluctuated. H Leonard cannot 
secure his side of the scrum 
and does not contribute signif¬ 
icantly in the loose, it may be 
time to contemplate an Eng- 
Jand scrum whhout him for 
file first time in eight yems. 

If the front five are operat¬ 
ing to good effect, then En- 
giand’s bade row. as it is. 
structured .at? {assent has a 
iftr''daiiiDe.‘«if'-sundvmg. ■ 
'game cat Saturday ubo 
suggested that, -in thedagfight 


that the Five Nations some¬ 
times becomes, die burlier 
^physique of a specialist No 8 
.would be .invaluable. It is 
worth remembering that, in 
: the recent game between Sara- 
- cens and Richmond, Tbny 
Dijprose opposed Scott 
Quahnell, who will surety be 
the Wales - No 8 at 

Twickenham. 

, Oh that day Di prose scored 
two tries in Saracens* win and 
he is one of the form players of 
'the; mpmerit — as is Tim 
: Rodber, file - Northampton 
No 8, who was kept off the 
England bench by a ham¬ 
string injury at the weekend. 
That there:are,drcumstances 
rn which the present back row 
of Lawrence Dallaglio^ Rich¬ 
ard Hill and Neil Back can 
play together is not in doubt 
but die championship is not 
necessarily one of them. 

Rodber, assuming he has 
recovered, offers experience 
and an abrasive quality in 
attack and defence; Diprose, a 
less obvious player, has quali¬ 
ties that would surety com¬ 
mend him to Woodward in 
respect of his good handling 
and his ability to draw the best 
mt of others by the timing of 
his pass. Were he to play, it 
■ might make sense to have 
Hill, another Saracen, atong- 
sidehini in his dub position of 
open-side flanker, though that 
would leave no vacancy for 
Bade, one of die few 
players whose reput¬ 
ation did not suffer at 
the Stade de France. 

Brian Ashton, the 
Ireland coach, would 
salivate al such riches. 

_ His players secured a 

slightly doubtful pen¬ 
alty try from their scrum in the 
first half of the game in Dublin 
and must have hoped for 
. another score when they had 
Scotland pinned jin the left- 
hand side of the field on their 
-own line after the interval 
But Scotland, who cannily 
sent an David Hilton as a 
tactical replacement during a 
sequenceof five-metre scrums, 

survived — as did Bath in 
similar circumstances against 
Brive in the Hdneken Cup 
finaL The result was exactly 
the same — a psychological 
turning point and a one-point 
win bom out. of die jaws of- 
defeat .. 


in- 


FOR THE RECORD 


t f 


7R. 


FOOTBALL 


A ft* 
TS 44- 
16 40 


38 20 33 
32 19 33 
37 33 31. 


FA CARLS8SW VASE SWtwound dr*r 
Taunton Town v MMNn; Spafcfing 
Un*adwTiv«ionTtJMr.SiidbirfW8ixlarerB 
v Tow taw Tewmc KWegtfw* AWNfc r 
FcObs Bar Town. - ■ 

□ TteBtDbe Foton*iy28 • 
Sunday's (atoresrito . 

ITALIAN LEAGUE AlrtirtsOPaimAO. " 
Lowfing portions 

P W D L 

Juwntus-IB 13 5 1 

Intamazionale. 19 12 4 3 — - 

UcBnesa_1911 4 4 39 to 37 

Laao—_ 1910 5 4 32 16 3S 

Borarttoa^..,. 19.9 8 4 

Parma. 19 9 8 4 

Sampdoria— 8 17 4,. — -- 
SPAMSH LEAGUE: DaporWo U Consia 2 
Rwl Madrid Z 

eswiANLEAaiteiWotfsiMsirccoi- 

o®»r- 

OUTCH LEAQUE LfteeW 2 Rvanotrt ft 
FC Votavtom 1 Boda JC Karioaflo 4: ftm 

WnMk 1 Afax & Doettcftan 1 PSV 
Brdhowr»2. . 

INTERNATIONAL MATCH: Parafluay 4 
Raland 0 (at AareSdn). 

CONCACAF SOLD CUP: Group one 
Jamaica 3 Guatemala 2 Baa 4 B 
SaNador 0 doom In L&a AngNes). 

7 - . GOLF 

LA JOLLA, Cadfamta: 

LmSng tra* aooroe (al US}: 204: S 
to. 71.84: S tends* 7T. 83. TUT 
Woods 71, to to «« Nfirw 

wdra note.) 205: 0 Um: U 62, 73, TttK 
SutfwlwdBR 67.TftT ArmotB i a67 7 3. 

■saws(wriswpaK 

Stars* to 7U 68: S Or* 66.72.70.4 Daly 
70. 70. to 


HOCKEY 


Mars SCOTTISH JNOOORLBJfiUE: 

net iMrtn CtydaadaM A 
Granges WteBtom InrSmajwon 5: JrwerteBh 
SMB^ijGcadoniBrB^MIffltacWfandarat; 
& yKBdatti 8 Grange i: Gordontens 3 

OydasdrieS; MIM11 wfarte mlncSapere qn 

BjjySrSBclWndBrere 3 MerOetshB 3: 

caydaodate 6 trwertBttt . 5; Grange 9 

Gadontawr &. WaMaroJncSMwri 10 

WnriK Wandarare 10 : MenaashB 6 MW 4 

WBMETTSWaSH LEAGUE; Cotayrr Say 

Srtypddaoa«oneaa2 . 

REGIONAL LEAGUES: EMC Ashtad.3 SI 
Albans 4- Cambridge Cty t Sws narts a 
Deretw l Walwyn Gadan Oty 1; IpawaSi 


SNOW REPORTS 




n_i h Weather 

Condtoons ftinsto . f5pm) Last 
L 1 y Piste OR Ip . resort “C snow 


ANDORRA 
SoJdeu ‘ 

AUSTRIA 
Kicrbubet - 

So8 

FRANCE 


50 95 good wtod 

(GoodsmrgconOOonson 


sun -2 312 

7 90 qcod varied art 1 

j&odJSng »« "**!*»■***»*) 

FRAMce _-_h oackKi good sun -2 21/t 


( ^c!f iyfl0 SrS slushy sun.: 2 21/1 
% AwriK ^od skiing in ffw morning on tfw UPber sfopesJ 

i ' !r * L ' f * racked fair surt -6. 20/1 

| Lsvigno 


SWITZERLAND 
Zernntt 


« is <**& 


line 5 '21/1 


{BOS-- - - - ■ 

skare; SW Ctebof-Qnw Britten. L - A***: U - upper art - aWidaL 


0 Buy St EGnmds Z South: Honbarn 2 
Maldanhaad 2; Raadhg 3 Hanpstwd 0: 
SajJharoctorvD BuMch 3c Tulsa Hi 1 
Hendon 0; Vfctohmoro HB 3 Wncham 3. 
WOtSTS HEN’S SCOTTISH INDOOR 
LEAGUE: Second tteMoi r FaOhB 10 
Pbrihshke 0; Grange 7 Bcroughmur 3i 

Forih VBl ‘ ~ ■ - *-- 

Hndand 
Borcuaftrur: 

Hndbrd 1; 

Gymnasts 5 
Royd Hgh Gymnasts wmrs, FOnhfl aiao 
(KuTuead. 


ICE HOCKEY 


SUPBUEAQUE ^ 


__. ScaAtisti Eagteo 1 

Manchester Swn 2. Nawcaatle Cobras t 
Basimloks Boon 1 (OT); ShefMd Start 
era SBracicnsfl Boa6« (Ot); ConiB Daite 3 
Ncttrfjhem Panttiers 1. 


NETBALL 


INTERNATIONAL MATCH: Wales 39 Eoq- 
land 49 pn CaitlHI) 

RACKETS 


QUEEN'S CLUB: Lacoato BriUahCgKc 


Stator flraf round: H Faster W 
16-iZ TM5, 17-14. 15-8: A Lyonfi bt K 
VAMfoer 7-15. 18-17. 8-15, 15-10. 15-13: P 
Hcho!taMJAciie9ai-&ay17-l4,158.17- 
15: N Crtpps wfa J Spuing ecr. 0 
TUchsrer-Bafred « K C«* 3-15. 4-15.16- 
6.158.15*11; T Barter« 0 Bam* ISO. 
15-5. 15-13; A Orchard wfo J Fenetey str. 
Second rouvLJ Mela bt Foster 1SS.T5-Z 
155; R Wrtrty bt Lyons 150.15-2.157; G 
Barter bt ffehola ISO. 157. 155; T 
SanreyGootaon bt Cripps 1511.15-9.15 
14; M Windows M D JoWson 157.154, 
11-15, 1510: 6 Smfitvangham wb C 
Danby eo; N Snath bt R Carter 157,1S-4, 
157:H Angus bUEBton 15-8.15-3,156, 
31 Hubberobt P Rosaw 155,16-8, ISO; G 
Peenar *b R Owen-ftoana eor. □ Mal®y 
WJ Gnirt 150,157,159. M Hue Wtams 
bt A ScarrrneA 152, ISO. 154 T Coctao# 
» D Wadgns 153 150, 151; P Brake t* 
TUchener-Baned 157,152.165; Bailer M 
PLeMarthand 4-15 150.12-15,159.15 
13. W Boone W Orchard 157.150.157. 
.-n*d round: Mato MWak£ty 154.153.15 
3; Windows a Smatv^hem 1514.15-6, 
156; Sm»T bt Angus 150. 1510, 15* 
Hubbsrdbt Palmar 1512.155.2-15.159; 
HueWaerosbtMaMy I5i0.1511,1513: 
Brake W Cockrofi 10-15.152. i5ii. 158. 


REAL TENNIS 


CLUB MATCH: MCC 3 HoNpart 2 (MX 
names flrar. R Lawrence end P Allen bt ft 
09MT and K Sniih 56.53.54; L Wbeafiey 
bt A Crook 52, B* ft Dews losl to R OSwt 
as, +8; M Estorick bl M Qddy50,56.5E; 
A BucMay and J Farral lost» D Poirier and 
J Sean 50.1-8,4-6} 



Budgett, the University of Wales Institute Cardiff No 8, powers out of a tackle in style to setup another attack 

Swansea make late surge in vain 


UW1C_14 

Swansea University.10 

By Gerald Davies 

THE University of Wales In¬ 
stitute Cardiff beat Swansea 
University yesterday to go 
through to the final of the 
inaugural Students European 
Rugby Championship, spon¬ 
sored by The Times. They will 
play Toulouse University. 

Cardiff did not have the 
opportunities yesterday that 
they so dearly enjoyed in the 
competition so for. In their 
three pool matches, against 
Queen's University, Belfast 
and the universities of Exeter 
and Edinburgh, they had 
amassed a total of 249 points. 
Swansea were in no mood to 
be so generous. If they lacked 
speed and the ability to pene¬ 
trate their opponents’ defence, 
their own defence was well 
organised and unflinching 
against a team whose ambi¬ 
tion at least was not matched 
by the appropriate skills. 

It left a feeling that if 
Swansea, who ifcere in the lead 
■for admter the'-whole of the- 


first half and in contention 
throughout, were ever to win, 
then Cardiff might endeavour 
to assist them. 

Both teams exhibited the 
enthusiasm and exuberance 
that one would expect from 
student teams, but in the first 
minute they went a step too 
far. The spectators had hardly 
settled down in their seats 
when, to everyone’s surprise, a 
full-scale fracas broke out at 
the first tackle. Two players 
were warned, though neither 
seemed to be the original 
culprits. Something similar 
occurred near the final whis¬ 
tle, but it was more in the way 
of students carrying out 
pranks. 

Vobe and Cooper seemed to 
be the thorns in Swansea’s 
side, doing their best to attack 
dose to the scrum. It was 
Vobe. from dose range, who 
kicked the two penalties to put 
Cardiff in the lead. Swansea, 
at this time, had given no hint 
that they were capable of 
scoring the kind of try they 
eventually did in the 
sixteenthininute. 

A feint and a delayed pass 
by Jones gave the time and 



space for Geraint John to go 
steaming down the middle 
and score near the posts. Rees 
convened. Cerith Rees. Swan¬ 
sea’s competent fly half, ex¬ 
tended their lead with a 
penalty. 

With the slope in their 
favour after the interval. Car¬ 
diff rarely left their opponents’ 
half. Both half backs contin¬ 
ued with their darting runs, 
but they were not well sup¬ 
ported by a midfield that 
continued to commit too many 
errors or were guilty of over- 
complication. 

There was a good contest for 


the lineout ball between the 
locks. Cardiff squandered a 
great deal of this, but Rees 
played a more careful game 
for Swansea, using his 
threequarters sparingly. 

Cardiff took the lead in file 
ninth minute with a fine 
threequarter movement in¬ 
volving Vobe, Andrew Wag- 
staff and Peter Davies. They 
created the gap for S homey to 
score. 

Paul Matthews's dropped 
goal extended this, but did not 
put fiie victory beyond doubt 
Swansea's final surge meant 
that Cardiff had a worrying 
few minutes before their cele¬ 
brations began. 

SCOflEf® Cm dft Tiy. Shorn* (49mlnj. 
Penalty goabr. Vobe 2 (7. 13i Dropped 

E MaUMews 179). Swansea: Try; John 
Conversion: Beet. Penalty goat: 
(25). 

9C0ANG SEQUENCE (Cairffl fell: 50. 
50.57.510 (tal-tkne). 11-10.14-10. 
UNIVERSITY OF WALES MSTITUTE 
CARDIFF: P Oevras; R Shonwy, C Wal. P 
Matthews. A Wsgsun: G Vobe, G Cooper. 
M Batten. GWBairci (lep: SJcnes. Simn). 
M OKeDy (rep: I Poiey, 7M. R Edwards. 
C Burrows, J WagsteJt, S Gardner, N 
Budget* 

SWANSEA UNNERWTY: G John: P 
Donovan. B Wtoanw. O Jones. M Everett: C 
Rees. £ LewBey, N Hennessey. AWBta J 
Manxfti. P Langley. A WngN. R Lewis. B 
Maran.RGrffWrs. 

Hote l o ec K Bradcton (WRU): ' 


SPORT 


ITTFTrTRa 


Byford is 
recalled 
by England 

■ RUGBY UNION: 

England’s women, wbo 

performed rather better 
than their male equivalents 
against France, have 
made one change to the XV 
that will play Wales af 
Waterloo on Sunday. Janice 
Byford, who is one of 
eight Saracens players in the 
team, comes in at loose- 
head prop instead of Jenny 
Smith, her dub colleague, 
who reverts to the 
replacements. 

England beat the 
French women's team J3-5 in 
Lille last month and will 
be encouraged to have Gill 
Bums, their experienced 
No 8. working her way bade 
to fitness after injury. 

Bums, the captain last 
season, is among the 
replacements. 

ENGLAND WOMEN: P Goorae (Wasps i; J 
Motyneux (Wderioo). S Day (W^psi. A do 
Btoso (Saacens). N Brown Mo n»S«i: G 
Pmgnet (Wasps). E Mil chad (Saracens, 
captain); J Byford CSaracen&i. J Poore 
(RKtvnanrf). M Edwards iSarscens). T 
Stwefc (Rcrtnonp), C Green (Saracens). J 
Ross (Saracens). H Clayton (Saracensi. C 
Frost (Saracens) Replacements: J Smith 
(Saracens). J Pom* (Wasps). G Bums 
(Waterloo). J Yapp IWorcasiefl. S Harris 
(Waterloo). K KragW (Oiri D&mngtonensi 

m 1ENNIS: Steffi Grafs 
long-waited return to 
competition suffered 
another setback yesterday 
when she pulled out of the 
Paris Open, although not for 
the knee injury that has 
sidelined her for eight 
months. 

The former world No 1 
pulled her left calf muscle 
practising on Sunday for 
the tournament this week 
and. after waiting 
overnight to assess the 
damage, opted against 
risking it and returned home 
to Germany. 

■ RACKETS: James 
Male, the world champion, 
who has recently been 
concentrating on real tennis, 
showed that he will be 
difficult to beat when he 
swept to the quarter-finals 
of the Lacoste Open singles 
by defeating Harry Foster 
and Robert Wakely without 
losing a game. His main 
rivals. Ne3 Smith and Willie 
Boone, had equally easy 
victories, but Peter Brake, the 
No 7 seed, had a dose 
match when defeating Tim 
Cockroft by three games 

to one. ' 


RUGBY UNION 


CHELTENHAM AND GLQUCESTBt CUP: 
Ouarttr-thal <baw; Bedtoid v Bratol; Soto v 
NcrthafTpuxr Gloucester v R te hnonfl: 
Leicester v London tort 
□ Ties to be ptoyed on February 21 
WOM&rS LEAGUE; Hr* dMMorc OH 
LearrinfiiortaB 27 Rictmond 21: Wrtp& 
66 Si Afcsns 0: Crawley 0 Waterloo 23; 
Saracens 74 Leeds 0 
SCHOOLS MATCH: Rteworth 26 
Gqgteswi*5 

SAILING 


WtfTBREAD ROUND THE WORLD 
RACE: Rtth teg (Auckland to Sao 
SetostiaD)- PoMUona (at 0600GMT. wnh 
milos to S&o SettesMo)- 1. EF 
(Sue) 4,5075: 2. Swedish Mach 
4518 fr. 3. Sft Cut (GB) 4.S26 6. 4. Mem 
Cup (Monaco) 4.631-3; 5. Toshtn MS) 
45*1.5; ft Cheesie Racaw (US) 4,5881; 7. 
Irinowfon Kraemar (Na) 4.S95 7; 8. 
BrurilSijieigy (Hoi) 4640.1; 9, EF Edu¬ 
cation (Stte) 4563 9. 


SNOOKER 


WEM8LEY CONFERENCE 
Benson and Hedges 
Wfflams (Wales) W SI- 


CENTRE: 
Final: M 
Hendry (Scot) 10-9 


THEiiiirnMEs 


A cure for 
bronchitis 


SQUASH 


OSLO: European c h am p ion al cham- 
plonce Man: Fhafc D Ryan {he} a A Thoran 
few®) 158. 55. 57. Women: Fnah S 
Migfr (Eng) M S Homar (Engl 51ft 57. 
54,54. 

TENNIS 


Open: Rrsl round: M 
IAP0rt3s(5p) 52,4-6,6-3, 


DUBAI: Dubai „ 
Ncrman{SM)btAPort3S(Sp)5 . 

F Mantfte (Sp) bl K Ataml (MOO 54.52. 
ST PETERSaJRa- Si PeWBtwg Open: 
Frol rorarct N Klin (3we) tit G SchaBer 

" 52. W> ret D SanganOTi |B) U L 

_(Gar) 52. 6-4: H DreeKmann 

,_, W K teno^arMtonsto (Ras) 51. 

6- 2. J-F Bacbeiot (Ff) bt D Pescanu (Rom) 

7- 5.53 

ATP RANKINGS: 1. P Samprae (US) 
1784P«3:2. P Ko rda pg 3 484:3. P Mto 
(Auk) 3^50,4, J E^rtmen (Swe) Z3T?. 5. 
M Re* (CMe) 280B; 6, V Mekrtpe (Itossl 
2.755; 7, M Chang (US) 2.742; 8. G 
RusadskJ (GB) 2.829; B. R Kra^crt (Hoffl 
2^24. 10. A Corretja Kp) aSW: 11. S 
B-uguera (Sp) 2^61; 12. G Kuenen (Brl 
Z2QZ 13, G WfeWte (Oof 2J3S7: 14. K 
Kucera (SlowaWa) 2.014; 15. F Iteliaa(Sp) 
1547; IS, T Muster (Auariaj 1.880; 17. M 
Pt^rcousris (Aus) 1809: 18, T Henman 
K3S) 1.788: 19. A Berestova BM 
2D. C PWtoa (Ft) i^S& to. ClM ISp» 
1.819:22. ACcste (Sp) 1538. 


POOLS FORECASTS 


Saeaday Fetatuvy 14 
Cotpw m fieue, kmeast 
FA CUP 
FIFTH ROUND 
1 AVaavCowrtry X 
2 SM*U»yRe«tog v 

3 l«ds v ftriMigham l 

4 NWCBSttB v Tranmore 1 

5 WrnWedon v Wefc/es X 

FA CARLING 
PREMIERSHIP 
BEvwen vDeby 1 

’ NAT10NIMDE LEAGUE 
RR8TDM90N 
7 Crewe v PcfWnoiiti 1 
BManCfcrrfBay- 1 

9MkWtefcrov8iatad1 
10 Port Veto wNontecfi 2 
UStadtowtvSttite 1 
12 W 6 aBianvQPfl t 
S6C0ND DJVWCN 
13 Btockpool v lAwl 2 
l« Bcunem'ffi v Cheernrt 

TREBLE CHANCE (home teams).- Aston 
VBa, Wlmfciodon, CatWe. OWtBm, Scu»- 
thorpe. Ban**. Hayes. KttJaminaH. 
Burton. Nuneaton 

BEST DRAWS: Aston Wta. Cafeto. 
OWwn. Stuntoorpo, Npmrtcn. 

AWAYte MBwal. Doncaster. Notts 
County, PBWtaou*.ttBBae. 


15 Brerlfexd v Prasten 1 
16BnstolCvG<r^iam 1 
17 Catsle vWeteta X 
laNorih'pton v Southend 1 
19CttSam vRtftem X 
20 PtaTeuto v Tort i 

SIWBBnvSn/nabf 1 

22 Wraxiwnv Bristol R 2 

23 litycombe v Brenfcy 2 

THfflDDMSIWJ 
34 Briafton v Doncaster 2 
25 OaSngton vr Notts Ca 2 
28 Haiimool v Cnester 1 

27 Mao^dv Leyton 02 

28 ffcttsrtafn v Srt'axayi 

29 Scafaocougnv Exeter 1 

SOScurtnrpayftocUMeX 
3t Swansea y Paertoto 2 
32 Tdrqwyv Hud 1 

BELL'S 

SCOTTISH LEAGUE 
• SECOND DIVISION 
32 Clydebart « Stremer 1 
3* Swnri'mue «ftadvi 1 


THRDDMSION 

35 BerwwL v Cbeelh X 
380 Part w Montrose 1 

VAUXHALL 
CONFERENCE 
S7Dowr vHetew 2 

38 HsyssvYeftri X 

39 HeteSad v Moncanbel 

40 KkrnteistBi y SwtipT X 

41 LBrtwhBdnaetord 2 

42 Nortfrwicft v Slcugn 1 

43 Tefcrd w Wc»nCi 1 

44 Wtoktog v Kettanng 1 
OR MARTENS LEAGUE 

PREMai DMaON 

45 AEtfMd v Hatesouen 2 
48 Burton vCratrtey X 

47 Ctrob'ga C v Braorcwl 

48 Merthyr vAthewone 1 

49 Nunescn v worc8s» X 

V denotes rod m&cti 

HOMES: Crewe. Manchester Cdy. Wesi 
Bromwich. Brerttart. Northampton. Hyro- 
ouft, Rotfwham, Toft^, C^dsoank 
ra®D DCM3S: Homes Crew. Manchester 
Oty Brenllrad. North a mpton. Rethahan. 
Aways-- Mlhral. IteBe tteurey. Pag- 
borough. Draw: Aston Vila. Cariete. 
Okfnm 


□ Vnce Wright 



BevtreatmmtforbfOBC&mi 


h t (n: • / w s ,v \v. t h c -1 i m c s. c o. u k 


CHANGING TIMES 


l 



























































50 SPORT / BROADCASTING _ 

SAILING: CHANGES DESIGNED TO BOOST ENTRIES FOR PREMIER OFFSHORE EVENT 

Admiral’s Cup forced to steer new course 


THE TIMES TUESDAY FEBRUARY 101998 ~ 


NO ONE can accuse the 
Royal Ocean Raring Club 
(RORC) or its commodore, 
Terry Robinson, of dithering 
in the face of a crisis. The 
club's response to the poor 
turnout in the Champagne 
Mumm Admiral's Cup last 
year has been to radically 
reorganise it and yesterday, 
the last dement of change was 
confirmed with the announce¬ 
ment of the Sydney 40 as the 
medium-sized boat next year. 

Robinson believes the gen¬ 
eral disquiet with what is 
supposed to be the world 
championship of offshore 
ocean raring, had reached a 
point where its very survival 
was in question. Last year 
only seven nations took part 
compared with a high point of 


By Edward Gorman, sailing correspondent 


19 In the mid-1980s, and (he 
changes that Robinson has 
overseen are armed at ensur¬ 
ing that at least 12 three-boat 
teams compete in 1999. 

Among the lay changes are 
the decision to move the Cup 
out of Cowes Week, to shorten 
the event to two weeks inclu¬ 
sive. to drop the Fastnet Race 
in favour of the Wolf Rock 
Race and to restrict the pro¬ 
portion of professional sailors 
to just 50 per cent of the crew 
on each boat All of these will 
make participation much 
more affordable. 

Last year, the middle-boat 
slot that was occupied by the 
rare and expensive ILC 40. a 
development dass that few 


owners could afford. Having 
decided to replace it with a 
one-design, the Admiral's 
Cup management committee 
invited bids and 11 companies 
submitted proposals. In the 
end, it came down to the Fair 
40 and the Sydney 40, the 
latter built by Bashford Boats 
in Sydney. 

Robinson said that the Syd¬ 
ney 40 had been the unani¬ 
mous choice of the ten- 
member International 
committee, despite the bet 
that the prototype has yet to 
take to the water. Fart of the 
attraction was an extraordi¬ 
nary charter deal offered to 
the RORC which will greatly 
reduce the cost of taking part. 


Bashford Boats has agreed 
to supply 15 boats in Cowes 
for the event for a charter fee 
of just El perboaL New suits 
of identical sails — foe use of 
which will be mandatory — 
will be supplied, which the 
company will buy bade, after 
the event for 40 per cent af 
their purchase cost 

The Admiral's Cup in 1999 
wIIL therefore, feature a rela¬ 
tively (heap one-design, foe 
Mumm 36. in the small-boat 
slot, foe virtually cost-free 
Sydney 40 in the middle skit. - 
and an open dass of boats of 
between 40ft and 50ft which 
are rated under the Interna¬ 
tional Measurement System. 

Robinson dismissed calls 


for a third one-design and 
rejected claims that there are 
not enough competitive big 
boats, or owners with foe 
money to build them. Some 
observers fear this could 
again restrict team numbers 
next year. It is thought how¬ 
ever. that an "age allowance" 
may be included to make 
older and production yachts 
in this band more competi¬ 
tive. 

□ Paul Cayard, on EF Lan¬ 
guage, was continuing to 
maintain his lead in the fifth 
leg of the Whitbread Round 
the World Race yesterday. 
Lawrie Smith, of Great Brit¬ 
ain. on Silk Cut was fourth, 27 
miles astern of Cayard with 
Swedish Match second and 
Merit Cap third. 


CRICKET 




' dUS; H 


Hutchison 
stakes 
all on sweep 

From Simon Wilde in matara 


PAUL HUTCHISON, the 
Yorkshire left-arm swing 
bowler, had never played the 
sweep shot until yesterday, 
but he chose the perfect time to 
extend his limited repertoire of 
barring strokes. With the 
scores level, three balls of the 
second unofficial Test match 
remaining and England A's 
last man on strike, he essayed 
a sweep at Arshad Junaid. the 
Sri Lanka off spinner, made 
rough contact and scampered 
off tor the winning run. 

Hutchison, who had come 
in moments earlier, fared six 
halls in all and might wpI! 
have been out to three of them. 
Somehow, though, he sur¬ 
vived to gather two vital 
singles that helped England to 
pull off a victory that had 
looked br 


start of play and then ap¬ 
peared there for the taking 
during an enterprising stana 
of 86 in 17 overs between Ben 
Hollioake and David Sales, 
both of whom scored 45. 

"We were just praying he 
would sweep." Nick fought, 
the England A captain, who 
still looked as white as a sheet 
as he welcomed Hutchison 
and Ashley Giles into the 
pavilion, said. The pulsating 
finale took its toll on all the 
England team and the large 
crowd that steadily grew in 
size as the day unfolded. 

Giles was the key figure in 
England's great escape. When 
they last their eighth wicket, in 
the chase to score 192 off 49 
overs on a slow, gently turning 
pitch, they might easily have 
shut up shop. Then they 
needed 30 off six overs, but 


Giles — assisted by Cosker — 
correctly calculated that attack 
was the best form of defence. If 
they had tried to block. Eng¬ 
land would surely have lost 

Giles used hisfeet to Junaid, 
who is still at school, and 
Niroshan Bandaratilleke, a 
talented left-arm spinner. 
Even when Cosker was 
bowled by Junaid with nine 
wanted. Giles responded by 
punching foe first ball of foe 
next over for four. 

Giles has been one of foe 
successes of this tour and. 
earlier in the match, had 
scored a vital 39 and bowled 
70 overs, taking seven wickets 
for 113 runs. "We always felt 
we had a chance as long as 
experienced players like Ash¬ 
ley Giles or Dougie Brown 


n I u • i [hi ^ j u *j r 


In fact. Brown played only a 
small part before becoming 
one of Junaid’s four vic¬ 
tims. 

Yesterday represented a re¬ 
markable last-day comeback 
by England after foeir frusbra- 
. tions of the previous day. 
when they took only three 
wickets. TTiey came out with 
renewed self-belief and, in¬ 
spired by some probing bowl¬ 
ing from Hollioake. who 
swiftly removed the overnight 
batsmen, continued to make 
steady inroads into the Sri 
Lanka second innings. 

By shortly after lunch. Eng¬ 
land had claimed six wickets 
for 84 in foe day. at which 
point with their total of280 for 
nine, Sri Lanka surprisingly 
declared, keeping alive their 
own hopes of winning rather 
than killing off England's. It 



Dean He^ ^Nrel ebratesfoed^^^^of ^vid WDfo^^a^fo ^^radh ainT^qrge 


for 65, on the final day of tzu 

was a bold cause that did them 
credit In three England A 
tours of Sri Lanka, there had 
never before been a positive 
result in nine unofficial Tests 
— nor often a sniff of one. 

The start of the run chase 
was not encouraging. James 
perished almost immediately, 
Knight and Maddy were 
becalmed before both they and 
Ealham fell while trying to 


raise the tempo This brought 
together Sales and Hollioake, 
who set a pattern for sweeping 
the spinners that Graham 
Gooch, the England manager, 
would have approved of and 
reduced foe requirement to 
102 from the last 20 overs. 

Their assertiveness drove 
Bandaratilleke to go round the 
wicket and try to frustrate 
them, but they swept him all 


the harder and he conceded 20 
in two overs. Then both fell to 
disappointing strokes. Sales 
cutting a straight ball from 
Junaid, Hollioake using his 
feet mice too often to 
Bandaratilleke. When Nash, 
trapped right in front of his 
stumps, and Brown soon fol¬ 
lowed. Sri Lanka were 
favourites with England 162 
' for eight But then came Giles. 



SCOREBOARD FROM MATARA 


SRI LANKA A: First (ratings 171 (M C 
Menrtis 58. A Gunawaidena 51: A F 
GUes A lor 52). 

SacorxNrarngs 

A Gunawardena b Coster .31 

■R P Arnold c James b GAes..79 

tP B Dassanayake fcnw b Hdfcoake 56 

□ R M JayawarCtene b Giles.. 9 

N Nawaz c Nash b HoUmaka.24 

M C Mendis b Brawn.II 

I da Seram c Brown b Cosker.29 

H Boferu c Kraghl b Giles.9 

N Bandanfltete b Hotoake.12 

R Per era not cm. . .. 0 

Extras (t 13. lb 5. nb 21.31 

Total (9 wWs dec)-280 


FALL OF WICKETS. 1-57, 2-139. 3-184. 
4-208. 5-217. 6-242, 7-260. 8-280. 
8-280 

BOWLING. Hulchiswi 11-W6-C. 
Hofl bake 22 4-8-67-3; Gales 44-18-61-3: 
Brawn 104-19-1, Cosker 32-7-75* 
Ealham 3-0-9-0. Maddy 5-1-54 
ENGLAND A First Inranas 260 (B C 
Hotrake 103; N Bandartirieke 4 tor 57) 
Second Inrangs 

S P James c Jayawardene b Penera.. 4 
■N V Knight c and b Jayawardene.. 12 
□ L Maddy c and b Jaywardene .. 33 

M A Eaffiarn b Bandana lake .1 

DJGSatesbJumad .. ..45 

B C HoHoate st Dassanayate 

b BandartBle.. 45 


fDC Nash KwbJUnted.. 6 

□ R Brawn c BandartiDake b Juntad... 9 

A F Gttes not oui_20 

0 A Coster b Junlad. 8 

P M Hjctrison not out.-2 

Extras {b 2, to 4, nb 1). 7 

Total (Bwkts)-ifli 

FALL OF WICKETS: 1-4. 2-36. 343. 

4- 51,5-137.6-149,7-159.8-162, 9-183 

BOWUNG: Pereira 30-15-1; Batau 5-2- 

5- 0 Bandamfleke 2&0-82-2: Jaya- 
wardone 10-1-33-2; Arnold 50-180: 
Junlad 7.4-0-28-4 

Umpires- R N S Slrasona and 
T H Wtjewardana 


South Africa retain Woolmer 


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Fan^lkntetiUpkaajiHtE4aitesflp«24lMn 


BOB WOOLMER has been 
reappointed as the South Afri¬ 
ca ooach until the end of the 
World Cup in June next year. 

“The board was unani¬ 
mous," Ali Bacher. the chief 
executive of the United Cricket 
Board of South Africa, said 
yesterday. “He has an excel¬ 
lent record since taking over in 
October 1994." Woolmer had a 
71 per cent success rate in 
limited-overs internationals. 
Bacher added, and a 42 per 
cent success rate in Test 
matches. 

With Woolmer’s future con¬ 
firmed, it was back to business 
for South Africa yesterday, 
with the focus shifting to the 
first Test match against Paki¬ 
stan. starting in Johannesburg 
on Friday. Hansie Cronje. the 
captain, is recovering from an 
operation to remove tom carti¬ 
lage from his right knee, so 
Andrew Hudson has been 
called up. Hudson, 31 foe 
Natal opener, produced a 
career-best 206 against 
Gauteng at the weekend, but 
will bat at No 5. Gaiy Kirsten 
will be captain, with Allan 
Donald and Daryii Cullinan 
recalled. Herschdle Gibbs 
drops to twelfth man, 

Michael Slater has been 
selected by Australia for foe 
forthcoming three-Test tour of 
India. He replaces Matthew 
Elliott, the Victoria left¬ 
hander. Slater, who turns 28 


By Our Sports Staff 

when the team lands in Bom- 
tray on February 21, was left 
out after a one-off Test in 
Delhi in October 1996. He 
averaged 47.41 runs in 34 
Tests before then, though, and 
this season has scored- 803 
first-dass runs at 57-36. Three 
spinners have been chosen — 
Shane Wame and Stuart 
MacGQl. both leg spinners. 


plus the uncapped New South 
Wales off spinner. Gavin Rob¬ 
ertson, who played four one- 
day international matches on 
the 1994 tour of Pakistan. 
There are two uncapped fast 

bowlers, Adam Dale, of 

Queensland, and Paul Wilson, 
of South Australia. 

AUSTRALIA PARTY: U A Taylor {captain). 
S K Waugh (wcecaptan). G S BtewetL AC 
Oale, I A HaaJy, M S Kasprawcz. D S 
Lehman SAGMaoCH, RTPoring, PR 
RbM. G R Robeneon, M J Saar. 5 K 
Wane, M E Waugh, P Wfean. 


Answers from page 46 
ADESPOTA 

W Literary works not attributed to (or churned by) an author. The 
Greek means "without an owner (despot)". Originally used as a title 
of eoHectioiis of anonymoos Greek poetry. “A labliogfa plucal pap a- 
on Burns's adcspola: verses fugitive, uasanctioficd or apocryphal" 
FALLAL 

(b) Trivia, frivolities. light-wrigtu matters. As a verb, to behave or 
dress in an affected or fmecfcing manner. To hfle. daffy or 
procrastinate. “Some people may find it rather odd. in a journal 
professedly devoted to training and education for industry, to come 
across film reviews, music notices and sneh faMaJs." 

CANAlGRE 

to A spedes of dock. Rumex hymenosepaJus. which is grown on 
sandy soils from Texas to Lower California, and whose roots are rich 
in tannin: also, (he tannin obtained from this plant 
8ARRAMUND1 

(a) The native name in Australia for any of various freshwater fish. 
The Aboriginal name. “Two species, Ceratodus Jasteri and 
Ccraiodus miolepis. are known from fresh waters of Queensland. 
The aborigines call it Barnunaada. a name which they appear to 
apply also to other largescaled < Freshwater fishes, as die 
Osteogfosgmn terchaidlL" 

SOLUTION TO WINNING CHESS MOVE 
£.. .. wins root for bishop as if 2. Bxd6 Be4 forces mate. 


TELEVISION CH OICE^ 

SuRGl 




Shop THI Yon. Drop 

Channel 4, dfflpm 


shops to Jure us in and get us to boy and there is a 
lot more toil than most of us probably, imagine. 
'Hie shop windowjor instance, is designed to catch 
foe attention from 25 yards away. Any more or less 
and the would-be shopper has been last Just inside 
foe door there is the decompression rone,-jargon 
for a space free of merchandise designed to allow 
the customer achance to acclimatise. Apparently 
once in the shop we tend to move to foe right, so 
that is where life best-selling items are displayed. 
Hard Hoots get us moving more quu&y.tnrough■ 
the store than a carpet AH of these moves have 
been carefully thought-exit by psydtoioguifs but. 
they are for from foolproof, as Owen, a middle- 1 
aged dvil servant, hilariously demonstrates. 

Cutting Edge 

Channel 4.9D0pm 

Malcolm Brinkworth concludes bis two-part series 
aboil those.nice people in Sussex who organise air 
ambulances for British holidaymakers who get 
sick or injured abroad. More cases are followed 
this week, two of them looking rather nasty. In 
France Bruce Reid and his family are involved in a 
car crash winch leaves his elderly mother with nine 
broken ribs, a punctured lung and internal 
bleeding. The prognosis is not good. It is even 
worse for Steve Jolley, a UN worker who has 
contracted malaria in Uganda. His kidneys have 
failed, he is in a coma and his chances of. survival 
are .rated at only one m five. All of which provides 
gripping material, but Brinkworth is thankfully 
not m the business of being ghoulish. In any case 
foe stars are foe doctors ana nurses of foe rescue 
service, whose efficiency, sensitivity and expertise 
are beyond criticism. 



Inside Story: Dazzled 

BBC1,930pm 

The more simple-minded 


ig us may. wonder 
shesasupemiodei 
from just a model Christopher 01giati*s mm tries 
to provide the answer. Having previously added 
Nan gold and before that foe amours of John 
R Kennedy, Olgiati enters very different territory 


Catwalk queen Kate Moss (BBC), 9-30pn* ; 


iootk_ the' free on a thousand covers ana. 

w three who accuse foe model 
ammunition for those wnu 

business of encouraging 

veteran and Dahl as one who has burst into, 
prominence in the past year. 

Omnibus: Pierre Bonnard 
BBCl. 1020pm 

The Bonnard exhibition at the London Tate 
Gallery is the occasion for a profile which is as 
-much about foe artisTS. ppsuse life 
contribution to modern painting. But as .EBs8nor ; - 
Yule's thoughtful film shows, it is tmposabteto 
separate the two. Maithe. foeywmg shopgrrt wto 
became the love of Bonnard’s life, was also his 
model and the inspiration for foe sensuous nudes ^ 
which belong to his finest work. But U.is suggested - 
that their.relationship, which lasted for 49 years,, 
had a darker and even tragic side. Ute pamtmgs 
themselves an? adduced as evidence of a growing 
distance between the two and it is suggested thto 
with Maithe increasingly subject to alness ana 
mental problems, then- house f above Can*** 
became lor Bonnard a prison. All the same, her 
death in 1942 left him desolate. Peter Waymarit 


RADIO CHOICE 


The Regiment 

Radio 4, lOJXktm, FM only 

Certain Radio 4 listeners never tire of reminding 
me that they cannot get FM where they are, 
therefore all mis cricket on long wave is a disgrace. 
So this rooming I have some splendid news for 
them: David Lloyd, die England cricket ooach, is 
presenting a programme on the frequency they 
cannot get. so they will not have to listen to him. 
Bener still, LJoytf himself cannot hear the 
programme because he is in the West Indies. As it 
happens, the programme is a splendid piece of 
English eccentricity, a portrait of the clubbable 
Englishman par excellence. The regiment has 
noming to do with the armed forces and refers to 
Lloyd and a few friends who gather at the. 


Cursed with Both Head and Heart 
Radio 4.2JX)pm 

Dorothy .L. Sayers, best known as the inventor of 
the aristocratic amateur detective Lord Peter 
Wimsey but also a distinguished essayist and 
translator, was one of foe most interesting people 
in British writing this century. She had a complex 
and often passionate private life, which tins 
programme, featuring her correspondence from 
the eariy 1920s onwards, unravels m fttil measure. 
Her love life was truly turbulent: she had ah 
obsession with the writer John Coumoswhich was 
to become an unhappy love affair and when that 
ended painfully she nad a child by an unemployed 
mechanic. The letters are introduced by Dr 
Barbara Reynolds. Sayers's biographer, and vead. 
by ShexhL MitcheU. Peter Barnard 





1 RADIO 1 


WORLD SERVICE 



. ri 


6Jaom Kevin Groaning and Zo6 BaB SjOO Sfcnon Mayo 1ZM 
JoWhfey. Includes 1<L30ptB NambeatSLOO Marti RadcRfa 
100 CSva WanoL Includes 545 Nmsbast 6L30.StBW. 


Reynart 840 John PaoL Includes Polythene h saaskjn 10J30 
May Arme Hobbs 1 -OOsni Cftarfte Jordan 440 Chris Moytas 


&00am Sarah Kennedy 7M Woks Up to Wogan 030 Msx 
Lester f 1.30 Jimmy Young 1.30pm OaMXs Thrower 3M Ed 
Stewart 5J0S Johnnie Water 7.00 James On te m y. Ehavaf 
aiWNIgQ) Ogden 94J0Me*yTat<5 Jazz aaoVidarBofgKThe 
Shortest Distance Between TWa Paopte1030Richard Atajon . 
Steve Madden 340 Amte Oflwn ~ n wjjVi 


Shalt; Lettering wilh Wfcrt 7.30 \ttrat's Mm* 748 the Lab 
UN Naws MOPauso fcrlhouglf.MS Weirollonat Radial 
SMM Nenra; Noms in German (648 only) 9U05 World Business 
Report 9 l 15 The Corporate Handbook *30 LAamtae Fie: The 
MM On The Robb 045 Spate .Roundup lOtOO Nd«sdmk : ' : 
1030 On Screen 11JW Nawsda* ,114IK3wbdfc)n tSUXF 
News 1245pm World Business Report 12.15 Brtafri Today 
1230 Heatti Mdtere 1245Spate RauiduplJtO NMnhotf =: 
2JM Nous 208Outlook 2J30~MUffirack HtCW 3J0Q News;. 

. News In German (648 Oily) MB Spate..Rotndup 3-15 
Westway.-3:90.. The GtaanHeid OoHacHcin. 4no Nam *.15, 
Soundbyte430The WbridToday; Noes in GahmTfS4B only) . 
. ‘Ms atah Today iOOEyrape Today 830 WbddjBpirtnejp. 


RADIO 5 LIVE 




VIRGIN RADIO 


CLASSIC FM 


5J90am Jaremy Ctar* 7.00 The Chris Evans BroaKast Show. S 4 ^ 1 **inj**m : 9» 

10.00 Russ WBSarn UOOpm Mck Abbot 430 Rc*in Bata Becad ot tea Waek and a rack* to 


,1. Hi * 


TALK RADIO 


mmm 


GjOOam On Air, watti Andrew McGregor, <ndix£ng . . 
Tcbafawsfcy (Cherubic Hymn, ihjroyol John 
Chrysostom}; Delius {Cefo Sonata ai One 
Movement; Vwcfi (Overtime Luisa Miner); Ravel 
(Rapsodfe Espagnole); VivakB (Concerto tn.G for 
two mendofins); Debussy (Celto Sonala} ... 
9.00 Mastarworio, with Pater Hobcby. Stravinsky . ■ 
(Scherzo & la Russe); Ravel (Alborada del. ■ 
Gradoso. MWrs); Waowr (Lohengrin, Prelude to - 
Act 1); Pucefi (tn NorrSie a 7); Mendelssohn 
(Syn^hony No 2 In B flat. Hymn of Praise}' 

10.30 Artist of U» Week. Nterray Fterahta reveals to.. 
Joan Batewrefllhesecrets o«prepartxi rratefcfar ' 
concerts and recordings, fflid hfs cfefiRa of 
contompofary music 

IIJW Sound StortML Donald Madeod axptorBs music 
inspired by The Ingenious Hidalgo Don Quixote 0e 
la Mancha by Miguel de CcrvanTes .- -V 
12.00 Conmoser of ttM Week: Chopfa 
1 Mpm The Radio 3 Luncfrtfma OoncerL BBC : 

Prams Chamber Music ‘97. The Endellion Quartet, 
Robert Cohen, cefla. Wobern (Langsamor Sat^; 
Schubert (&rihg Quintet ii C) (r) 

2.10 The BBC Orchestras. ffiC Nttflonal Orchestra of 
Wales Lnder Tadaaki Otaka, wUi Taamte Utfe, 
viofin. Grace VWBfiams (Ponilfan); Brahms tVScdlrt 
Concerto in D); Dvorak (Symphony No B in G) 

4.00 Voksas: R o ma n tic Scots. Songs written In turn-' 
aWhe<»tufy Scotland, pertormed by Usa MBne, 
soprano, and Jamie MacDooug^. tenor, 
accompanied by Roger VSgnotes, piano, and 
9oned WHtems, harp (j - - 


- 445 Music Machinate Tommy Raarson tries to solve 
Bach s musical puistes 

bSS? tethB aopr ^° 

7J°fte ,, orn , «no* on 3. Lhra from the Concert Hatt. 
^BrOTdc^wHcxise.FfarestBnTrio: Anthany 
• Maravood, vtoarv Richard Lester. ceUo. Suswi 
- ]]? T1Bs ^ an,:i ' Schumann (Piano Trio ii F); Baor - 
j^^^i a-aPSdontei qea Ashorts^by •. 

Amertten concert pianist has a breatefcS?'^ 
, r awngaR aformance oJ Baalhoven's ftjurth Pteno- 
. « S°«»fa*^ !jMxtoWt-(Planp Trio h BHafl 
9 ‘ 30 ^ Bnscht Ceraiin—And . 

TtoefruTtotery. Adrian MBcheS kxife'at Btw*f *. 

P 1 ® «attora ix*jdeM»ia v 
o » P fe W i afe Harold Ptoter &SL ; '■ i 

. ^SymphowOrchMtr., ur** 

vnoW. MJnna'Kaal:? 

1tMS after «s 

01 ^iJrio w 

IZ^tom JazzNat**. Ojgby presorts a * ■ 

Drew'iuQuartat, featuring : " 
■I rin cjnsaxophone “ anmn a -... 


>(LW) 
10 Fa 



5jOO PM with Claire 1 
• Svppfrnfiorac: 

m 







t-i''- 7'i*' 




■ii V 4iA* » 4i i i i i ii lli 

!>!■ I i l ' . lI» 


f7T7i|T^r 

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1 ■ 1 1: 

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teadaft 


ecploratfon 




Tdmtoion amt radio Balings oompiM hy Peter Dwr, ten Hughaa, Roaamwv^ir 

Gregory *ad John lleftoiwte SmIUv 















































































































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ms 


TELEVISION 51 



1 

;. r, ‘" , -‘nu 

\:r:**b** 

-• JV 1 '* hi) 
....' ; v,| lih- 

. Vi. 1 ' 

- •!.• risjj 


Motion 


, painful reminders 


"aVe 

-• t- - ""' 

'-hit} 

‘ L'- 7 ai i 

• ""inai l 
• 1 n..n, * 

■_=*:- .-«* .„ w 


•asked him 
he<fidntralaxjnore ‘ 

_ ,-work: less; 'NoS ' 

Coward liked to say thatwork was ". 
Touch more&ga lhij. iun (although 
this raay ha^beoibecause aw¬ 
ard's kind 'gf fan could get a man 
an^sted-hz^^ feost days) . But if 
you find cvwyutBc bwji idea of fan 

bcfl •T—espetially iF^eirnc^i^^^ 
fun. isr pining; 235 ft down : 

| taflest rollercoaster, .and 
you dt^opverti^ifytxjevehstq?' : 
OTtoafc^w qukkly.' 

. A Pfcfftuguese gameshow'whidi d 
pays.peijple big-money to over-‘ 
come theur fears thought rt wouki' 
be fun tobring 30year-c^d Susan/ 
na—rscared ofhe&k&j.—bverftd^n . 
Lisbon and shoveller down Bladc- 
pool^EfigOne (nowyou know.why 
Lisbon never became Tnnnour . 
capital of die world). And then the 1 
makersofPkasnreBeaditBBCl)/ 
thought If would" be fun fjrfflnithe' 
game show people filming’Susaik 


na -as she wept with fear., al-.flfie' 
prospect of hoarding Blackpool^ 
235-ft-hjgh big dipper^Waldiinga 
TV crew fibamg a TVerew brmgs 
us one step closer to the day when 
“the only .docu-soap suKeet left to 
otploft will be the making of a 
doaihsoap. 

“What land bf mtertainmeht do. 
you call this?" Susanna waited 
through her. tears , to die show's 
permanently grinniog tewt, Jorge 
, oHe’s Portugal's JemnyBeadle," 
said : Pleasure Beach's Barrafer, 

. Nick Hancock, exploiting; the free¬ 
dom afforded him by Portugal's 
presumably lax defamation laws). 

At leastthaifs whai the subtitles 
told us she had said, though 
maybe the dialogue was mistrans- 
lafetL and that what Susanna had 
actually screamed was: “Jorge,- 
. Whatever you do don't stop grin- 
nfag like a cretin, or betray any 
sign that you fed at all ashamed 
ahout'bwnfliatmgmeTike this.^ 

Jorge huIEed her into dimbing 


aboard first with words, then with 
cash. He offered her around £500. 
Finally Susanna relented. The 
impression Jorge conveyed was 
that greed had got the better of her 
phobia. The truth was probably 
that she just surrendered to the 
nagpng of the camera lens, em¬ 
barrassed to be holding up 50 
other passengers .who had grown 
restless with her shilly-shallying. 

SO Who was it who squealed 
about Susanna's phobia to Jorge? 
Actually, her mum did. Obviously 
a warm, ■ supportive mother- 
daughter relationship there, then. 

ore fraught mother- 
daughter relationships 
over on BBG2 in Child- 
ren Of Divorce, the first of three 
programmes by Hilary Clarke 
.exploring bow children cope with 
andreact to divorce. No narration, 
rio commentary, no sensationaj- 
: ism, no apportioning of blame, 
and ho grinning Jorge. 


REVIEW 



Joe 

Joseph 


But what exactly was the aira of 
this collage of interviews with 
children, all aged between six and 
22, and whose parents have split 
up within die last two to ten years? 

Vcyeurism? Too discreet for 
thaL To beat the drum for mar¬ 
riage and traditional family val¬ 
ues? Not nearly judgmental 
enough for that. To make parents 
think even more deeply than most 
of them already do when they 


decide to turn their backs on each 
other — bearing in mind that 
nearly a quarter of children will 
experience divorce by the rime they 
are 16? Thai must have been it. 

Like a photograph slowly reveal¬ 
ing itself in a developing tank, an 
image emerged of a future genera¬ 
tion wounded in ways they” barely 
understand — not that a passer-by 
would have detected the damage: it 
was mostly internal bleeding. 
Many are convinced that their 
father left "because he doesn't like 
us any more". Others, not yet 
teenagers, have stepped into de¬ 
parted mothers' shoes, feeding and 
dressing their younger siblings. 

A young sari — maybe nine, red 
T-shirt, ponytail, a stuffed, pink 
elephant on her bed — recalls the 
day she saw her father pack his 
bags: "I went back to my room to 
think about what I’d just seen, 
because 1 knew I wasn’t supposed 
to watch than having a row. And 
then I heard the door slam. And 


then that was it After my parents 
split I didn’t have anybody round 
to my house. I used to go to other 
people